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dulcinea3
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)

[ Edited ]

MadamedeChevreuse wrote:

This last episode however, has left us all thoroughly confused - what was the relationship between Arthur, Amy, and Mrs. Clennam? I haven't been able to read the book (yet) and I apologize profusely if this has already been covered - I tried scanning a few boards, but there's too much to go through all at once! So I thought I might ask the people who seem to know what the story's all about. Thanks for any assistance you can offer!


Here is another answer based on the novel:

 

Arthur's father fell in love with a dancer and they had a baby - Arthur.  Arthur's father's uncle Gilbert married his father off to a respectable woman, who became Mrs. Clennam.  She took Arthur from his real mother and raised him as her own.  Arthur was raised believing that Mrs. Clennam was his mother.

 

The other part is much more convoluted.  The dancer that was Arthur's real mother was a protege of Frederick Dorrit before he was ruined.  He was interested in music and apparently sponsored various young performers.  Arthur's great-uncle Gilbert left a bequest to Arthur's mother, and also a bequest was to Frederick Dorrit's youngest daughter, in thanks for his kindness to Arthur's mother.  If he did not have any daughters (which he did not), the bequest was left to the youngest daughter of his brother.  This, then, was Amy.  Phew!

 

Rigaud snapped his fingers tauntingly in her face. 'One thousand guineas to the little beauty you slowly hunted to death. One thousand guineas to the youngest daughter her patron might have at fifty, or (if he had none) brother's youngest daughter, on her coming of age, "as the remembrance his disinterestedness may like best, of his protection of a friendless young orphan girl." Two thousand guineas. What! You will never come to the money?'

'That patron,' she was vehemently proceeding, when he checked her.

 

'Names! Call him Mr Frederick Dorrit. No more evasions.'

Message Edited by dulcinea3 on 04-27-2009 11:00 AM
Message Edited by dulcinea3 on 04-27-2009 11:00 AM
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MadamedeChevreuse
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)

Ahhhhh, now it makes sense! Thank you both very much for answering so depth - it is interesting to see the differences between the film and the novel, and I can see why Mr. Davies had to cut it all down now. Even though it is convoluted as he presented it, it sounds like the original would've been much harder to portray. (Though it is one of the reasons I like Dickens' work - everything is always interconnectable!)

 

Anyway, thank you both for your help in the matter! My parents will be glad to finally understand what exactly the whole relationship was - besides confusing, that is. :smileyhappy: 

A book is like a mirror: If an idiot peers into it, you can't expect an apostle to look out.
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DCGuy
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)


MadamedeChevreuse wrote:

Ahhhhh, now it makes sense! Thank you both very much for answering so depth - it is interesting to see the differences between the film and the novel, and I can see why Mr. Davies had to cut it all down now. Even though it is convoluted as he presented it, it sounds like the original would've been much harder to portray. (Though it is one of the reasons I like Dickens' work - everything is always interconnectable!)

 

Anyway, thank you both for your help in the matter! My parents will be glad to finally understand what exactly the whole relationship was - besides confusing, that is. :smileyhappy: 


 

You are very welcome.  If you read one of the other message boards where Mr. Davies responded to questions on the screenplay, he did alter the ending of the TV series when compared to the book.  In the TV show, Arthur finds out everything about his past (real mother, the reason for his father's deathbed plea, etc.).  In the novel, he doesn't get all of the actual answers and even burns a piece of paper given to him by Amy just before he leaves prison.  The piece of paper appears to have contained the legacy information.  He thought it was superstitious request from her.  Mr. Davies said that he changed the ending to make for a more emotionally satisfying ending to the storyline.  It gave Arthur final closure to the entire mystery.  The novel, from my viewpoint, appears to have left the mystery unresolved from his perspective.  But, since he was being released from prison and was going to marry Amy, the original quest for answers was no longer important.

 

Some made a remark that there was some confusion about Amy and Arthur being possible half-siblings making their marriage carry incestuous overtones.  I don't think Dickens nor Mr. Davies would imply that in the storyline.   The confusion on this appears to stem from the confrontation scene between Rigaud and Mrs. Clennam.  I will relook that scene to see if I can find the source of this confusion.

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DCGuy
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)


DCGuy wrote:

MadamedeChevreuse wrote:

Ahhhhh, now it makes sense! Thank you both very much for answering so depth - it is interesting to see the differences between the film and the novel, and I can see why Mr. Davies had to cut it all down now. Even though it is convoluted as he presented it, it sounds like the original would've been much harder to portray. (Though it is one of the reasons I like Dickens' work - everything is always interconnectable!)

 

Anyway, thank you both for your help in the matter! My parents will be glad to finally understand what exactly the whole relationship was - besides confusing, that is. :smileyhappy: 


 

You are very welcome.  If you read one of the other message boards where Mr. Davies responded to questions on the screenplay, he did alter the ending of the TV series when compared to the book.  In the TV show, Arthur finds out everything about his past (real mother, the reason for his father's deathbed plea, etc.).  In the novel, he doesn't get all of the actual answers and even burns a piece of paper given to him by Amy just before he leaves prison.  The piece of paper appears to have contained the legacy information.  He thought it was superstitious request from her.  Mr. Davies said that he changed the ending to make for a more emotionally satisfying ending to the storyline.  It gave Arthur final closure to the entire mystery.  The novel, from my viewpoint, appears to have left the mystery unresolved from his perspective.  But, since he was being released from prison and was going to marry Amy, the original quest for answers was no longer important.

 

Some made a remark that there was some confusion about Amy and Arthur being possible half-siblings making their marriage carry incestuous overtones.  I don't think Dickens nor Mr. Davies would imply that in the storyline.   The confusion on this appears to stem from the confrontation scene between Rigaud and Mrs. Clennam.  I will relook that scene to see if I can find the source of this confusion.


 

Please read my other post regarding the confusion on Amy and Arthur being half-siblings on the other subject message forum for Andrew Davies -Screenwriter for Little Dorrit.   Hopefully, I covered all of the bases in my explanation there.

 

FYI.  If anyone is interested in purchasing the video of Little Dorrit (or anything else from Barnes and Noble), they can get a 20% discount off all online orders if you use the coupon code of H4E7B3W during the checkout process.   I don't know how long this coupon code will last, so place your order before the code expires.  Please note that the discount is applied before sales tax.

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DCGuy
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)

[ Edited ]

Please go to this URL link provided by PBS.ORG that has the actual Rigaud script when he confronts Mrs. Clennam.  There is no blood relation between Amy and Arthur (see explanation on the bottom of the page).  Amy just happened to be born on the poor dancer's death date and was left in the will because of it.

 

Personally, I liked the Frederick Doritt connection better, but this explanation is just as good.

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/littledorrit/synopsis_ep5.html

 

Click on the "read full synopsis" link.

Message Edited by DCGuy on 04-30-2009 08:00 PM
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ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)

CONGRATULATIONS to all involved with the making of LITTLE DORRIT!

 

Tonight it has won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries!

 

Andrew Davies has also won for Outstanding Writing!

 

Dearbhla Walsh, Outstanding Directing for Part 1.

 

Way to go!

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
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dulcinea3
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)


ConnieK wrote:

CONGRATULATIONS to all involved with the making of LITTLE DORRIT!

 

Tonight it has won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries!

 

Andrew Davies has also won for Outstanding Writing!

 

Dearbhla Walsh, Outstanding Directing for Part 1.

 

Way to go!


 

That's great!!!  Unfortunately, I missed that section of the Emmys last night, while I turned to PBS to watch Inspector Lewis.

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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)

[ Edited ]

I skipped watching the PBS Mystery show in order to see the Emmy awards. Only four of the 10 nominated categories were announced on the TV show last night. Someone posted an online message that Little Dorrit won seven Emmys. If so, I don't know which other four categories that it won for the remaining six unannounced categories. I guess they only considered these four as "major" category awards and skipped over the rest due to lack of time.

 

FYI.   Andrew Davies was not present to accept the Best Screenwriting award. Dearbhla Walsh was present to accept the Best Directing award.   Anne Pivcevic, Rebecca Eaton, and Lisa Osborne were present to accept the Best Miniseries award

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DCGuy
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)

The miniseries won in the following 7 categories

1) Best miniseries

2) Best Directing for a miniseries

3) Best Screenwriting for a miniseries

4) Best art direction for a miniseries

5) Best casting for a miniseries

6) Best cinematography for a miniseries

7) Best costume for a miniseries

 

It did not win the remaining three nominated categories

1) Best supporting actor for a miniseries

2) Best hairstyling for a miniseries

3) Best music for a miniseries

Author
ConnieAnnKirk
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)


DCGuy wrote:

The miniseries won in the following 7 categories

1) Best miniseries

2) Best Directing for a miniseries

3) Best Screenwriting for a miniseries

4) Best art direction for a miniseries

5) Best casting for a miniseries

6) Best cinematography for a miniseries

7) Best costume for a miniseries

 

It did not win the remaining three nominated categories

1) Best supporting actor for a miniseries

2) Best hairstyling for a miniseries

3) Best music for a miniseries


 

Thank you very much for this roundup, DC!

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
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DCGuy
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Re: Little Dorrit: The PBS Film (spoilers, ok)

Just to clarify. Best Directing went to Dearbhla Walsh for directing Part 1 (PBS episodes 1 through 3). Best Cinematography went to Part 1. Best Costume went to Part 3 (PBS episodes 7 through 9). The costumes used in the Italian scenes were most likely the reason for this award You can view the PBS production of Little Dorrit right now for a limited time. This includes the Laura Linney introductions, the PBS advertisements (the song sung by Coldplay), and the Masterpiece Theater Classics music (which replaced the BBC program music on the DVD). Please note that there are several scenes missing (such as the confrontation scene between Amy and Rigaud as she leaves Pet's room in Italy, Henry Gowan's visit to Arthur's lodging place, and many other scenes cut out or shortened). due to the PBS editing to fit the miniseries into its alloted time slot. The commercial DVD program runs around 452 minutes while the PBS episodes are a little over 440 minutes. http://video.pbs.org/video/1095188649/program/979359625 The website said it will be available until October 7.
Melissa_W
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Little Dorrit streaming at PBS until 9/30

In case anyone missed an episode or wanted to see Little Dorrit again, PBS is streaming all episodes of the miniseries until 9/30.  Go to www.pbs.org :smileyhappy:

Melissa W.
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DCGuy
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Re: Little Dorrit streaming at PBS until 9/30

[ Edited ]
It seems that two sites have different dates for the videos. One says September 29 while another says October 7. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/littledorrit/watch.html (Sept. 29) http://video.pbs.org/video/1095188649/program/979359625 (October 7) The Sept. 29 end date appears to be a Windows Media player version. The October 7 end date appears to be an Adobe Flash player version.
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DCGuy
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Re: Little Dorrit streaming at PBS until 9/30

[ Edited ]

Just an update about the commercial DVD and PBS program versions of Little Dorrit.

I timed the entire shows between the commercial BBC DVD and the Emmy Award promotion DVD (which is based on the USA broadcast on PBS) and the total times are as follows:

Commercial BBC version (14 episodes) - total time of 452 minutes

PBS USA version (5 parts) - total time of 436 minutes

The online version and the USA broadcast had to edit out roughly 15 minutes from the BBC UK broadcast in order to fit the miniseries into the program time slot. So there were 15 minutes of deleted scenes missing on the PBS program. The PBS show's overall time does actually go beyond 452 minutes for the broadcast, but that additional time is taken up by extra material (review of last week's episode, the Laura Linney introductions, and a longer running ending credits).