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Choisya
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

You are very kind IBIS and thanks a lot for those lovely roses, which have perfumed my heart today:smileyhappy:

 


IBIS wrote:

Choisya, I absolutely disagree... NO THORNS for you. Maybe some handpicked white or yellow friendship roses from my garden... without thorns.

 

I've always enjoyed reading your posts, and some have given me much food for thought.

 


Choisya wrote:

I'll forgive you Dulcie:smileyvery-happy:.  Debs reminded me recently that I will shortly make my 10,000th post to these boards and that is surely proof that instead of laurels I should receive thorns for spending more time than I should here, instead of doing more useful things!:smileysurprised: 

 

 


dulcinea3 wrote:
Choisya, I'm sorry - I gave you Laurels without thinking!  As soon as I had done so, I realized, but I don't think there is any way for me to back them out!  Sorry!!!

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 08-06-2009 06:21 AM

 


 

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Choisya
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Romanticism v. Realism

[ Edited ]

POSSIBLE SPOILERS. 

 

I was rather stunned when at the end of chapter 9 we are told Emma is pregnant, with no discussion whatsoever of the circumstances, desire or lack thereof, or emotions surrounding this development after apparently several years of marriage.

 

I think this is yet another deliberate example of realism overtaking romanticism P.  After several years of marriage and 'romanticising' Emma hasn't given a thought to pregnancy which, given the times and lack of birth control, she surely should have done. Instead she dreams of the Viscount and of a life in Paris.

 

I am re-reading Madame Bovary after a gap of around 60 years and am now appreciating the writing much more.  The juxtaposition of romanticically beautiful and realistically gritty paragraphs is both delightful and clever.  Take for instance the paragraph in Chapter 8 describing the dining room at the Chateau where Emma found herself 'wrapped round by the warm air, a blending of the perfume of flowers and of the fine linen, of the fumes of the viands,and the colour of the truffles' which contrasts starkly with the next paragraph about the old Duke amongst the women 'bent over his full plate, his napkin tied around his neck like a child...eating, letting drops of gravy drip from his mouth.' Then, contrasting her idealised view of the marquis and marchioness' lives and 'gentlemen with flowers in their buttonholes talking to ladies around the fire', we find that the old Duke had 'lived a life of noisy debauch, full of duels, bets, elopements; he had squandered his fortune and frightened all his family'.  This sort of juxtaposition is repeated throughout the novel and I find it fascinating and very unusual.  I cannot think of another author who uses this technique. It brings a frisson to my reading because I know that whatever beautiful description I read, I will soon be brought down to earth by the reality.  Things are never what they seem in this novel, just as they are often not what they seem in real life.

 

Additionally, the detailed descriptions of the clothes people wore and the places in which they lived accurately brings the period to life -  I am 'seeing' this novel as well as reading it.  I first see the romantic thatched roofs of Yonville, 'like fur caps drawn over the eyes...whose coarse convex panes have knots in the middle like the bottom of bottles...[where] the ground floors have at their door a small swing gate, to keep out the chicks that come pilfering crumbs...' and the Lion d'Or inn where 'a man...in green leather slippers, and wearing a velvet cap with a gold tassel, was warming his back at the chimney'.  I then see the realistic brick houses, belching factory chimneys and rumbling foundries of the town where her lover lived, together with the 'waiters' aprons which smelt of absinthe, cigars and oysters'.   

 

There is also some clever eroticism such as 'nothing in the world was so lovely as her black head and white skin standing out against this purple colour, when, with a movement of shame, she crossed her bare arms, hiding her face in her hands' (no doubt covering her naked breasts).  After a romantic description of their meeting and of the lovers' bed, we are quickly reminded of the shame of her adultery.    

 

 

BTW the description of Normandy and Picardy at the beginning of Part Two Chapter I is that of the area we now associate with the battlefields of WWI and the Normandy landings of WWII.  Rouen, a few miles inland, is the capital of Haute (Upper) Normandy. Abbeville, in Picardy, is on the Somme river and Flanders, of course, we associate with the Flanders poppy of WWI, commemmorated by the American poet John McCrae.  Although Flaubert describes these fields as 'needing much manure to enrich this friable soil full of sand and flints', it is now a successful market gardening area and poppies still bloom there in profusion.   

 

 

 

 


Peppermill wrote:

"In today's world, Emma's unwise choices don't have the overwhelming social stigma of her times."

 

Probably not her romantic ones, but what about her lack of responsible involvement in her community, her motherhood, or her  financial responsibilities?  She didn't need to stop her intellectual pursuits in music or painting either.  She seems to be totally isolated and/or unable to make friends, at least female friends, either with peers or servants.

 

I was rather stunned when at the end of chapter 9 we are told Emma is pregnant, with no discussion whatsoever of the circumstances, desire or lack thereof, or emotions surrounding this development after apparently several years of marriage.  Especially, this surprised me for an author with the reputation of Flaubert as writer of one of the "perfect" novels.  (Perhaps there shall be one of his illuminating flashbacks?)

 

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 08-08-2009 05:31 AM
Message Edited by Choisya on 08-08-2009 05:42 AM
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Lmfwhite
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)


bartzturkeymom wrote:
Yes indeed, girls did get married and if teens were the same then that they are now, the part of the brain that makes sound, reasond choices is undeveloped until age 23. She was definitely more in love with being in love than actually being fond of Charles.

As a mother of a teen age girl who thinks she is in love, I agree wholeheartedly!  I firmly believe my daughter is in love with being in love and I wish it gave me some peace to know that 150 years ago, some things haven't changed!:smileysurprised:

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)


IBIS wrote:

I agree that I was stunned by the one sentence at the end of Chapter 9 that Emma was expecting a child. It's succinctness was startling.
Flaubert usually carries on and on and on.... I fully expected detail upon detail of her pregnancy, her wardrobe, her morning sickness... 

But how refreshing to read something that immediately grabs your attention and makes you want to read more......do you think he did that on purpose?

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bartzturkeymom
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Romanticism v. Realism

Thank you for your wisdom and I appreciate you helping with the geography! My husband's father's uncle was killed in that area during WWI so he is always interested when I share new connections to his study of that war. 
 

 
Choisya wrote:

POSSIBLE SPOILERS. 

 

I was rather stunned when at the end of chapter 9 we are told Emma is pregnant, with no discussion whatsoever of the circumstances, desire or lack thereof, or emotions surrounding this development after apparently several years of marriage.

 

I think this is yet another deliberate example of realism overtaking romanticism P.  After several years of marriage and 'romanticising' Emma hasn't given a thought to pregnancy which, given the times and lack of birth control, she surely should have done. Instead she dreams of the Viscount and of a life in Paris.

 

I am re-reading Madame Bovary after a gap of around 60 years and am now appreciating the writing much more.  The juxtaposition of romanticically beautiful and realistically gritty paragraphs is both delightful and clever.  Take for instance the paragraph in Chapter 8 describing the dining room at the Chateau where Emma found herself 'wrapped round by the warm air, a blending of the perfume of flowers and of the fine linen, of the fumes of the viands,and the colour of the truffles' which contrasts starkly with the next paragraph about the old Duke amongst the women 'bent over his full plate, his napkin tied around his neck like a child...eating, letting drops of gravy drip from his mouth.' Then, contrasting her idealised view of the marquis and marchioness' lives and 'gentlemen with flowers in their buttonholes talking to ladies around the fire', we find that the old Duke had 'lived a life of noisy debauch, full of duels, bets, elopements; he had squandered his fortune and frightened all his family'.  This sort of juxtaposition is repeated throughout the novel and I find it fascinating and very unusual.  I cannot think of another author who uses this technique. It brings a frisson to my reading because I know that whatever beautiful description I read, I will soon be brought down to earth by the reality.  Things are never what they seem in this novel, just as they are often not what they seem in real life.

 

Additionally, the detailed descriptions of the clothes people wore and the places in which they lived accurately brings the period to life -  I am 'seeing' this novel as well as reading it.  I first see the romantic thatched roofs of Yonville, 'like fur caps drawn over the eyes...whose coarse convex panes have knots in the middle like the bottom of bottles...[where] the ground floors have at their door a small swing gate, to keep out the chicks that come pilfering crumbs...' and the Lion d'Or inn where 'a man...in green leather slippers, and wearing a velvet cap with a gold tassel, was warming his back at the chimney'.  I then see the realistic brick houses, belching factory chimneys and rumbling foundries of the town where her lover lived, together with the 'waiters' aprons which smelt of absinthe, cigars and oysters'.   

 

There is also some clever eroticism such as 'nothing in the world was so lovely as her black head and white skin standing out against this purple colour, when, with a movement of shame, she crossed her bare arms, hiding her face in her hands' (no doubt covering her naked breasts).  After a romantic description of their meeting and of the lovers' bed, we are quickly reminded of the shame of her adultery.    

 

 

BTW the description of Normandy and Picardy at the beginning of Part Two Chapter I is that of the area we now associate with the battlefields of WWI and the Normandy landings of WWII.  Rouen, a few miles inland, is the capital of Haute (Upper) Normandy. Abbeville, in Picardy, is on the Somme river and Flanders, of course, we associate with the Flanders poppy of WWI, commemmorated by the American poet John McCrae.  Although Flaubert describes these fields as 'needing much manure to enrich this friable soil full of sand and flints', it is now a successful market gardening area and poppies still bloom there in profusion.   

 

 


 

 



 

There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it. - Edith Wharton
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bartzturkeymom
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

I hear you Mom!

Lmfwhite wrote:

bartzturkeymom wrote:
Yes indeed, girls did get married and if teens were the same then that they are now, the part of the brain that makes sound, reasond choices is undeveloped until age 23. She was definitely more in love with being in love than actually being fond of Charles.

As a mother of a teen age girl who thinks she is in love, I agree wholeheartedly!  I firmly believe my daughter is in love with being in love and I wish it gave me some peace to know that 150 years ago, some things haven't changed!:smileysurprised:


 

There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it. - Edith Wharton
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Romanticism v. Realism


Choisya wrote:

 

 

I am re-reading Madame Bovary after a gap of around 60 years and am now appreciating the writing much more.  The juxtaposition of romanticically beautiful and realistically gritty paragraphs is both delightful and clever. 


I, too, am rereading Madame Bovary and can appreciate the writing and objectives of Flaubert without having to mainly concentrate on the story.  I love what you said about "romantically beautiful and realistically gritty"....so very true!

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Choisya
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Romanticism v. Realism

I wonder if, for the purposes of our reading here, it needs to be read twice?  Once for the story and then again for the writing and Flaubert's technique?

 

 


Lmfwhite wrote:

Choisya wrote:

 

 

I am re-reading Madame Bovary after a gap of around 60 years and am now appreciating the writing much more.  The juxtaposition of romanticically beautiful and realistically gritty paragraphs is both delightful and clever. 


I, too, am rereading Madame Bovary and can appreciate the writing and objectives of Flaubert without having to mainly concentrate on the story.  I love what you said about "romantically beautiful and realistically gritty"....so very true!


 

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IBIS
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Rereading It

After a 30-year gap, I re-read last month's "Grapes of Wrath". I had disliked the novel at 16. I hoped that I would pick up what I had missed during my adolescence. 

 

But I found that I disliked "Grapes of Wrath" even more, but for different reasons.

 

I'd read "Madame Bovary" in my early 20s, and genuinely loved the story of poor, misunderstood Emma. Exactly like me in my romantic 20s, all she wanted was emotional fulfillment.

 

Rereading it in my late 40s is a wonderful but totally different experience. I'm seeing Emma through the lens of (more?) mature emotional experience, and actual motherhood. 

 

My reading pace is slower; I savor Flaubert's delicious writing. I'm focusing more on hi technique and style. 

 

I hope I like "Madame Bovary" as much as I did in my 20s. For very different reasons.

 

 


Choisya wrote:

I wonder if, for the purposes of our reading here, it needs to be read twice?  Once for the story and then again for the writing and Flaubert's technique?

 


 

 

IBIS

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Fozzie
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)


IBIS wrote:

 

Sometimes reading these long, descriptive passage can be a plodding and slow process; the accumulation of detail can sometimes be monotonous. 

 

No wonder it took him 5 years to finish the book.

 

Did anyone else find these long descriptive passages too detailed? Too much? 


Yes, I have been skimming some of them.

Laura

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)


Bowlie wrote:
I hope that I'm not horribly off-base, but I got the feeling that Emma was infatuated with Charles and the idea of marriage and love. After she got married, she realized how isolating marriage was and although Charles adored her, he didn't pay much attention to her. I believe it said somewhere in the first few chapters that she was 15 when he first started visiting her and her father. She left her family and any friends she might have had to become a wife at such a young age (although this was probably commonplace at the time I'm sure). There has to be some dissatisfaction in that no matter how old you are. Give up something familiar for something unknown that ends up being quite lonely. While I agree she is rather spoiled, I felt for her loneliness that she exhibited in the first chapters of the book.

 

I don't think you are off base --- I agree.
Laura

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)


Peppermill wrote:

I was rather stunned when at the end of chapter 9 we are told Emma is pregnant, with no discussion whatsoever of the circumstances, desire or lack thereof, or emotions surrounding this development after apparently several years of marriage.  Especially, this surprised me for an author with the reputation of Flaubert as writer of one of the "perfect" novels.  (Perhaps there shall be one of his illuminating flashbacks?)


Since the novel originally was released in installments, I assumed that this was the end of one installment and meant to leave the readers surprised and wondering the details, eager to buy the next installment.

 

I think the same could also be true of this passage from the end of Chapter Two:

 

A week after, as she was hanging up some washing in her yard, she was seized with a spitting of blood, and the next day, while Charles had his back turned to her drawing the window-curtain, she said, "O God!" gave a sigh and fainted.  She was dead!  What a surprise! 

 

I laughed out loud at this passage!  I thought, "How convenient!"  Now he can marry the "real" Madame Bovary.

Laura

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

I am reading the B&N Classics version of the novel, translated by Eleanor Marx Aveling.  It contains A Note on the Translation that I found useful and excerpt here:

 

Still, Aveling and all Flaubert's English translators before Geoffrey Wall in 1992, made two drastic changes from Flaubert's original to "normalize" the text for English readers.  First, she omitted Flaubert's italicizations of cliches --- a use of irony that has since been used to great advantage by such contmeproary American writers as Gary Indiana and Brett Easton Ellis.  Second, she simplified Flaubert's use of tenses, using mainly just the past and present.  In the original French, Flaubert uses complex forms of both past and future tenses to enact Emma's state of longing and further enter her mind.  For example, at the end of part one, chapter seven, Aveling translates "Emma went across the road," whereas Flaubert wrote, "Emma would go across the road."  This odd and consciously nostalgic use of tense as an emotional trigger would later be used by Georges Perec...

Laura

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

You are not at all off base.  Young women of that period were brought up to regard marriage as the only worthwhile thing in life and so they invested it with great romanticism.  Given that they met few suitable men because they were not allowed out and about, they had to see their suitors through rose-coloured spectacles lest they found warts.  It must have been quite terrifying for young brides, not really knowing the men they 'chose' and knowing absolutely nothing about sex either. 

 

 

 

 

Bowlie wrote:
I hope that I'm not horribly off-base, but I got the feeling that Emma was infatuated with Charles and the idea of marriage and love. After she got married, she realized how isolating marriage was and although Charles adored her, he didn't pay much attention to her. I believe it said somewhere in the first few chapters that she was 15 when he first started visiting her and her father. She left her family and any friends she might have had to become a wife at such a young age (although this was probably commonplace at the time I'm sure). There has to be some dissatisfaction in that no matter how old you are. Give up something familiar for something unknown that ends up being quite lonely. While I agree she is rather spoiled, I felt for her loneliness that she exhibited in the first chapters of the book.


 

I don't think you are off base --- I agree.

 

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

I am reading a second printing by Bantam Books published in 1959.  It definitely looks like an antique but I couldn't pass it up.  I found it in a consignment book store for $1.00.  When it was published in 1959, it was sold for $.35 as a Bantam Classic.  Wonder if it is worth anything today?  :smileywink:   My "modern" translation is by Lowell Bair with an introduction by Malcolm Cowley.  Is anyone else reading this version?  I could not find the passage you mentioned below in my translation.  I'm thinking my version is vastly different than yours.  Can you give me a brief description of what is taking place when this passage is written?  At the end of my Part 1 Chapter VII, she is walking her greyhound Djali and almost every sentence begins with or contains "she would......."  If you cite a specific passage I can compare it to my version and cite the same passage.  Thanks.


Fozzie wrote:

I am reading the B&N Classics version of the novel, translated by Eleanor Marx Aveling.  It contains A Note on the Translation that I found useful and excerpt here:

 

Still, Aveling and all Flaubert's English translators before Geoffrey Wall in 1992, made two drastic changes from Flaubert's original to "normalize" the text for English readers.  First, she omitted Flaubert's italicizations of cliches --- a use of irony that has since been used to great advantage by such contmeproary American writers as Gary Indiana and Brett Easton Ellis.  Second, she simplified Flaubert's use of tenses, using mainly just the past and present.  In the original French, Flaubert uses complex forms of both past and future tenses to enact Emma's state of longing and further enter her mind.  For example, at the end of part one, chapter seven, Aveling translates "Emma went across the road," whereas Flaubert wrote, "Emma would go across the road."  This odd and consciously nostalgic use of tense as an emotional trigger would later be used by Georges Perec...


 

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

LMF -- Here is the on-line text of Madame Bovary as translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling.

 

"A gamekeeper, cured by the doctor of inflammation of the lungs, had given madame a little Italian greyhound; she took her out walking, for she went out sometimes in order to be alone for a moment, and not to see before her eyes the eternal garden and the dusty road. She went as far as the beeches of Banneville, near the deserted pavilion which forms an angle of the wall on the side of the country. Amidst the vegetation of the ditch there are long reeds with leaves that cut you.

 

"She began by looking round her to see if nothing had changed since last she had been there. She found again in the same places the foxgloves and wallflowers, the beds of nettles growing round the big stones, and the patches of lichen along the three windows, whose shutters, always closed, were rotting away on their rusty iron bars. Her thoughts, aimless at first, wandered at random, like her greyhound, who ran round and round in the fields, yelping after the yellow butterflies, chasing the shrew-mice, or nibbling the poppies on the edge of a cornfield."

 

From Chapter Seven, Part One


Lmfwhite wrote:

I am reading a second printing by Bantam Books published in 1959.  It definitely looks like an antique but I couldn't pass it up.  I found it in a consignment book store for $1.00.  When it was published in 1959, it was sold for $.35 as a Bantam Classic.  Wonder if it is worth anything today?  :smileywink:   My "modern" translation is by Lowell Bair with an introduction by Malcolm Cowley.  Is anyone else reading this version?  I could not find the passage you mentioned below in my translation.  I'm thinking my version is vastly different than yours.  Can you give me a brief description of what is taking place when this passage is written?  At the end of my Part 1 Chapter VII, she is walking her greyhound Djali and almost every sentence begins with or contains "she would......."  If you cite a specific passage I can compare it to my version and cite the same passage.  Thanks.


Fozzie wrote:

I am reading the B&N Classics version of the novel, translated by Eleanor Marx Aveling.  It contains A Note on the Translation that I found useful and excerpt here:

 

Still, Aveling and all Flaubert's English translators before Geoffrey Wall in 1992, made two drastic changes from Flaubert's original to "normalize" the text for English readers.  First, she omitted Flaubert's italicizations of cliches --- a use of irony that has since been used to great advantage by such contmeproary American writers as Gary Indiana and Brett Easton Ellis.  Second, she simplified Flaubert's use of tenses, using mainly just the past and present.  In the original French, Flaubert uses complex forms of both past and future tenses to enact Emma's state of longing and further enter her mind.  For example, at the end of part one, chapter seven, Aveling translates "Emma went across the road," whereas Flaubert wrote, "Emma would go across the road."  This odd and consciously nostalgic use of tense as an emotional trigger would later be used by Georges Perec...



 

 

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)


Fozzie wrote:

I am reading the B&N Classics version of the novel, translated by Eleanor Marx Aveling.  It contains A Note on the Translation that I found useful and excerpt here:

 

Still, Aveling and all Flaubert's English translators before Geoffrey Wall in 1992, made two drastic changes from Flaubert's original to "normalize" the text for English readers.  First, she omitted Flaubert's italicizations of cliches --- a use of irony that has since been used to great advantage by such contmeproary American writers as Gary Indiana and Brett Easton Ellis.  Second, she simplified Flaubert's use of tenses, using mainly just the past and present.  In the original French, Flaubert uses complex forms of both past and future tenses to enact Emma's state of longing and further enter her mind.  For example, at the end of part one, chapter seven, Aveling translates "Emma went across the road," whereas Flaubert wrote, "Emma would go across the road."  This odd and consciously nostalgic use of tense as an emotional trigger would later be used by Georges Perec...


 

Thanks for sharing that, Fozzie!  That tense usage is exactly what I commented on in one of my posts.  The use of 'would' makes it seem like he is describing something habitual, and yet he would then appear to be describing one particular incident.  However, if I understand that commentary correctly, it seems to be saying that all English translations prior to 1992 changed that, and that cannot be correct, as I bought my copy when I was in college in the late 70s, and it is certainly in English!  The translator was Alan Russell, and he dated his Introduction 1949.
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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

Well, The Note on Translation in my book must be in error.  I only found the phrase "Emma went" in the searchable translation posted by Peppermill in three spots:

 

 

Madame Bovary - Chapter Five
s a cure in plaster reading his breviary. emma went upstairs. the first room was not furnish

 

Madame Bovary - Chapter Six
i should like to kiss berthe," said leon. emma went down a few steps and called felicite.

 

Madame Bovary - Chapter Eight
lly-- "such is life!" "has life," emma went on, "been good to you at least, since ou

 

None of these is the phrase that was cited.  I couldn't find the phrase in my translation either.  Odd.

 

Moreover, Dulcinea found that all translation prior to 1992 do not change the tense to past.

 

What I do take from the comment is that translations did change the tense of verbs to the past.  I did find past tense throughout Chapter Seven, just not the right phrase.

 

Laura

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Re: MADAME BOVARY: Book 1 (Chapt. 1-9)

Here is what is written in my translation by Lowell Bair: (There is a big difference.  I may be biased but I just love this older translation. It may be wordy, but the words are so beautifully put together.  You can visualize the smallest detail.)

 

"A gamekeeper whom Monsieur had cured of pneumonia gave Madame a little Italian greyhound bitch.  She took her with her whenever she went out for a walk, which she did now and then in order to be alone for a while without having to look at the everlasting garden and the dusty road.

 

"She would walk to the beech grove at Banneville, near the abondoned pavilion which stands at the corner of the wall facing the fields.  The bottom of the ditch there is overgrown with grass and rushes with sharp-edged leaves.

 

She would begin by looking around to see if anything had changed since her last visit.  She always found everything in the same place; the foxgloves and gilly flowers, the clumps of nettles around the stones and the patches of lichen along the three windows, whose shutters, always closed, were rotting away from their rusty iron bars.  Her thoughts were usually vague at first, wandering at random, like her greyhound, which would begin to run in circles in the fields, barking at yellow butterflies, chasing shrewmice and chewing on the poppies at the edge of a wheatfield.  Then her mind would gradually focus; sitting on the grass and poking at it with the tip of her parasol, she would ask herself over and over, 'Oh, why did I ever get married?'"

 


Peppermill wrote:

LMF -- Here is the on-line text of Madame Bovary as translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling.

 

"A gamekeeper, cured by the doctor of inflammation of the lungs, had given madame a little Italian greyhound; she took her out walking, for she went out sometimes in order to be alone for a moment, and not to see before her eyes the eternal garden and the dusty road. She went as far as the beeches of Banneville, near the deserted pavilion which forms an angle of the wall on the side of the country. Amidst the vegetation of the ditch there are long reeds with leaves that cut you.

 

"She began by looking round her to see if nothing had changed since last she had been there. She found again in the same places the foxgloves and wallflowers, the beds of nettles growing round the big stones, and the patches of lichen along the three windows, whose shutters, always closed, were rotting away on their rusty iron bars. Her thoughts, aimless at first, wandered at random, like her greyhound, who ran round and round in the fields, yelping after the yellow butterflies, chasing the shrew-mice, or nibbling the poppies on the edge of a cornfield."

 

From Chapter Seven, Part One