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Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Sense and Sensibility: The Masterpiece Classics Film -- Edward and Col. Brandon

Ha!  Maybe Everyman will believe you - he didn't believe Laurel and me when we said there had been a duel!  Unless it is spelled out literally, Everyman tends not to believe something.  Austen did not use the word "duel", so he does not believe there was one, although it seemed quite obvious to me!

 

That's a bit strong.  I am simply careful about what I read into novels.  I want to think through what the author is saying/meaning, not jump to conclusions.  

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Sense and Sensibility: The Masterpiece Classics Film -- Edward and Col. Brandon


Everyman wrote:

Ha!  Maybe Everyman will believe you - he didn't believe Laurel and me when we said there had been a duel!  Unless it is spelled out literally, Everyman tends not to believe something.  Austen did not use the word "duel", so he does not believe there was one, although it seemed quite obvious to me!

 

That's a bit strong.  I am simply careful about what I read into novels.  I want to think through what the author is saying/meaning, not jump to conclusions.  


 

I'm half teasing, half serious.  I remember, during our discussion of Rebecca, you seemed to reject all theories that were not literally explained in the novel.  For example, if DuMaurier did not write that Mrs. Danvers set the fire, then Mrs. Danvers could not have set the fire, etc.
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Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Sense and Sensibility: The Masterpiece Classics Film

Not being much familiar with English geography, the relation of places to one another tends to go over my head.  So, when the Dashwoods are living at Barton Cottage, they are in the same area as where the Steeles live? 

 

Here is a map of Devonshire Dulcie.  Barton Park and Barton cottage are near to Bideford in the north.  The novel is set in the village of Upton Pyne, near Exeter, which has a lovely church.  The seaside areas in S&S are Dawlish and Weymouth.  Dawlish Warren is a particularly long, sandy beach.   Weymouth is in Dorset, to the east of Devon on the south coast and is often mentioned in Austen's novels.  Norland Park is in Sussex which is several counties away, also to the east.

 

I hope this helps!  :smileyhappy:

 

 


dulcinea3 wrote:

Joan_Klingel_Ray wrote:

 

Dear Pedsphleb,

I believe Everyman ws asking about other film versions of S&S that stick closer to the novel, including having a plain, shy, non-talkative Edward Ferrars, and that one is the old Irene Richards / Tracey Childes version. Note that in the novel S&S, Edward is in the novel for two whole chapters before he utters a single word of direct speech. And that word is "Devonshire!" when Mrs. Dashwood announces that she and her daughters will move there. (He says "Devonshire!" with some surprise / shock as that is where he went to school and met and became enagaged to Lucy Steele.)

 

Cheers,

Joan


That is an interesting detail that I hadn't realized, Joan.  Not being much familiar with English geography, the relation of places to one another tends to go over my head.  So, when the Dashwoods are living at Barton Cottage, they are in the same area as where the Steeles live?  If so, no wonder Edward was concerned with the move, as he would be more likely to run into Lucy if he came to visit!


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Sense and Sensibility: The Masterpiece Classics Film


Choisya wrote:

Not being much familiar with English geography, the relation of places to one another tends to go over my head.  So, when the Dashwoods are living at Barton Cottage, they are in the same area as where the Steeles live? 

 

Here is a map of Devonshire Dulcie.  Barton Park and Barton cottage are near to Bideford in the north.  The novel is set in the village of Upton Pyne, near Exeter, which has a lovely church.  The seaside areas in S&S are Dawlish and Weymouth.  Dawlish Warren is a particularly long, sandy beach.   Weymouth is in Dorset, to the east of Devon on the south coast and is often mentioned in Austen's novels.  Norland Park is in Sussex which is several counties away, also to the east.

 

I hope this helps!  :smileyhappy:

 

 


dulcinea3 wrote:

Joan_Klingel_Ray wrote:

 

Dear Pedsphleb,

I believe Everyman ws asking about other film versions of S&S that stick closer to the novel, including having a plain, shy, non-talkative Edward Ferrars, and that one is the old Irene Richards / Tracey Childes version. Note that in the novel S&S, Edward is in the novel for two whole chapters before he utters a single word of direct speech. And that word is "Devonshire!" when Mrs. Dashwood announces that she and her daughters will move there. (He says "Devonshire!" with some surprise / shock as that is where he went to school and met and became enagaged to Lucy Steele.)

 

Cheers,

Joan


That is an interesting detail that I hadn't realized, Joan.  Not being much familiar with English geography, the relation of places to one another tends to go over my head.  So, when the Dashwoods are living at Barton Cottage, they are in the same area as where the Steeles live?  If so, no wonder Edward was concerned with the move, as he would be more likely to run into Lucy if he came to visit!


 


 

Thanks, Choisya.  I don't have time to go through all the novel, but I can't really determine so far where the Steeles are actually from.  I found that when Lady Jennings came across them, they were staying with friends at Exeter, which is in Devon, and also that their uncle, where Lucy and Edward met, lives near Plymouth, which appears to be just over the border in Cornwall.

 

What part of the novel is in Upton Pyne, as you say?  I thought it was mostly set around Barton Park and Cottage, which you say are in the northern part of the county, as well as in London and Norland.  And then there is Cleveland, which I don't know the location of.

 

:smileyvery-happy: Some of the names on that map give me ideas!  "For dessert, would you prefer a dish of Puddington, or would you rather have some nice Melbury Bubb?  To be washed down with a glass of Chillation, naturally!"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Author
SyrieJames
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎12-19-2007
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Re: Sense and Sensibility: The Masterpiece Classics Film

The Ang Lee/Emma Thompson version of "Sense and Sensibility" is one of my favorite films of all time, and it, along with the BBC's P&P and Jane Austen's brilliant books, inspired me to write my novel, "The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen."  When Masterpiece Classics announced that it was remaking S&S, I awaited it with low expectations; after all, how could it possibly compare to the brilliant movie I knew and loved so well?  

 

When I saw the mini-series last year, however, I loved it!  Although the new version made a few changes that didn't work for me, such as the seaside location and the incorporation of the duel (which was only mentioned in one line in the novel), I loved the casting and enjoyed the expanded story line.  Now, I like both versions equally!

 

--Syrie James

 

Read the best-selling novel

"The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen" by Syrie James

Avon A, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishing

 Look for "The Secret Diaries of Charlotte Bronte,"

On Sale 6/30/09

Visit http://www.syriejames.com

 


Learn more about
The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen





Visit www.syriejames.com
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Sense and Sensibility: The Masterpiece Classics Film -- Edward and Col. Brandon

No, as I recall I didn't say she couldn't have set the fire.  I said there was no proof that she had set the fire.  I think it's fine to speculate about what we as readers think the author is suggesting, as long as we acknowledge them as speculations. 


dulcinea3 wrote:

Everyman wrote:

Ha!  Maybe Everyman will believe you - he didn't believe Laurel and me when we said there had been a duel!  Unless it is spelled out literally, Everyman tends not to believe something.  Austen did not use the word "duel", so he does not believe there was one, although it seemed quite obvious to me!

 

That's a bit strong.  I am simply careful about what I read into novels.  I want to think through what the author is saying/meaning, not jump to conclusions.  


 

I'm half teasing, half serious.  I remember, during our discussion of Rebecca, you seemed to reject all theories that were not literally explained in the novel.  For example, if DuMaurier did not write that Mrs. Danvers set the fire, then Mrs. Danvers could not have set the fire, etc.

 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense and Sensibility: The Masterpiece Classics Film

What part of the novel is in Upton Pyne, as you say?  I thought it was mostly set around Barton Park and Cottage, which you say are in the northern part of the county, as well as in London and Norland.  And then there is Cleveland, which I don't know the location of.

 

 

 

Austen based the Barton locations on Upton Pyne.  Cleveland is a house in Somerset, a county to the north east of Devon.  Upon reading further I see that Norland Hall is based on upon Saltram House in Plympton near Plymouth, not the one in Sussex.  Plymouth is is Devon. Exeter and Plymouth are about a 4-5 hour stagecoach ride from Bideford.  London is about 250 miles away from Exeter so several days stagecoach ride as four-in-hand coaches travelled at only 13kph. I don't think Austen used any London locations. 

 

Here are the locations for the 1995 film.  I was basing my locations below on the areas which Austen herself supposedly knew and used for the novel.      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


dulcinea3 wrote:

Choisya wrote:

Not being much familiar with English geography, the relation of places to one another tends to go over my head.  So, when the Dashwoods are living at Barton Cottage, they are in the same area as where the Steeles live? 

 

Here is a map of Devonshire Dulcie.  Barton Park and Barton cottage are near to Bideford in the north.  The novel is set in the village of Upton Pyne, near Exeter, which has a lovely church.  The seaside areas in S&S are Dawlish and Weymouth.  Dawlish Warren is a particularly long, sandy beach.   Weymouth is in Dorset, to the east of Devon on the south coast and is often mentioned in Austen's novels.  Norland Park is in Sussex which is several counties away, also to the east.

 

I hope this helps!  :smileyhappy:

 

 


dulcinea3 wrote:

Joan_Klingel_Ray wrote:

 

Dear Pedsphleb,

I believe Everyman ws asking about other film versions of S&S that stick closer to the novel, including having a plain, shy, non-talkative Edward Ferrars, and that one is the old Irene Richards / Tracey Childes version. Note that in the novel S&S, Edward is in the novel for two whole chapters before he utters a single word of direct speech. And that word is "Devonshire!" when Mrs. Dashwood announces that she and her daughters will move there. (He says "Devonshire!" with some surprise / shock as that is where he went to school and met and became enagaged to Lucy Steele.)

 

Cheers,

Joan


That is an interesting detail that I hadn't realized, Joan.  Not being much familiar with English geography, the relation of places to one another tends to go over my head.  So, when the Dashwoods are living at Barton Cottage, they are in the same area as where the Steeles live?  If so, no wonder Edward was concerned with the move, as he would be more likely to run into Lucy if he came to visit!


 


 

Thanks, Choisya.  I don't have time to go through all the novel, but I can't really determine so far where the Steeles are actually from.  I found that when Lady Jennings came across them, they were staying with friends at Exeter, which is in Devon, and also that their uncle, where Lucy and Edward met, lives near Plymouth, which appears to be just over the border in Cornwall.

 

What part of the novel is in Upton Pyne, as you say?  I thought it was mostly set around Barton Park and Cottage, which you say are in the northern part of the county, as well as in London and Norland.  And then there is Cleveland, which I don't know the location of.

 

:smileyvery-happy: Some of the names on that map give me ideas!  "For dessert, would you prefer a dish of Puddington, or would you rather have some nice Melbury Bubb?  To be washed down with a glass of Chillation, naturally!"