Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Our next selection with the Masterpiece Classics series is Wuthering Heights.  Please use this thread to discuss the book.
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

One of my very favorite novels, ever.  When I was in junior high, I saw the movie with Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon, and loved it so much that I went out the very next day and bought the book.  I was surprised and delighted to find that the movie only covered the first half, so I had much more to enjoy that was new to me!

 

I wish that Emily Bronte had lived longer and written more novels.  What a talent.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

I will be fascinated to see how this series presents the character of Heathcliff.   I though the Lawrence Olivier presentation, though it was decades ago that I saw it, was in many ways a vastly false presentation of Heathcliff (not his fault, he had to follow the script given to him).  We'll see how this version treats him! 

 

And in only 3 hours instead of the 4 they devoted to Tess, which was still not enough time to do all of Tess justice.  

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Correspondent
simple_girl
Posts: 160
Registered: ‎12-28-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Once I started reading Wuthering Heights I couldn't put it down. Catherine and Heathcliff are both angry and self absorbed creatures that have only one redeeming quality, love. Their love for one another gives them a ture human element, although, that too, would be selfish most of the time. My favorite part is when Heathcliff tells Ms. Dean that he wouldn't hurt Edgar unless Catherine wished it because he loved her too much. I felt compassion for him at that moment. A beautifully written novel that captures one of the greatest sacrifices that a human can make.

"It is not what we say or feel that makes us what we are. It is what we do or fail to do."
Inspired Contributor
JohnP51
Posts: 1,294
Registered: ‎12-31-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Like "Tess", I have neither seen any movies based on "Wuthering Heights" nor read the book. I have it now and have read about halfway through it to date. What a dark and moody tale this is but it's one that I'm having a hard time putting down and I look forward to seeing the Masterpiece Classic broadcast of it.

 

While I haven't seen any movies of "Wuthering Heights", I have seen clips from several productions of the book. I was curious how they handled Heathcliff's looks at moods and I have to say that they all disappointed me. Hopefully, this new broadcast will show him the way I picture him to be.

John

"Books are for people who wish they were somewhere else." ~ Mark Twain
Contributor
Omnifox
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎01-05-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Same as with fellow members I have yet to read or see any of the movies. At first I was finding it hard to get intrested in the book, especially with the first few chapters. I have only made it about halfway through but now I am finding it hard to put down. Once the narrative switched to the housekeeper and we are getting the history it is really engrossing. Tess I felt grabbed you right away and this book took a bit to get started but so far I really like it.

 

Just a side note does anyone else use help while reading the books such as study guides, dictionarys etc. ? I find them helpful plus Everyman and Connie help also!! :]

Inspired Contributor
PhoebesMom
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎01-05-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Everyman stated

 

I will be fascinated to see how this series presents the character of Heathcliff.   I thought the Lawrence Olivier presentation, though it was decades ago that I saw it, was in many ways a vastly false presentation of Heathcliff (not his fault, he had to follow the script given to him).  We'll see how this version treats him! 

__________________________________________________________________

 

It has been a while since I saw this presentation as well, but I agree with you. 

 

Healthcliff is the lifeblood of the book and the character on which the success of the film hangs.  I suppose that the case could be made that the same is true of Catherine (Earnshaw) Linton, but in my opinion it doesn't hold true.  Cahterine dies early on, yet we have Heathcliff throughout the book playing with the lives of the others as with puppets.I know that if I am disappointed with the casting and acting of Heathcliff the whole project will be tainted for me.
Inspired Contributor
PhoebesMom
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎01-05-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

This was my second reading of Wuthering Heights.  Again, I find that, like Nelly Dean, as Catherine grew older and more self-centered rather than less, I found it hard to like her or have much sympathy towards her.  I feel that she brought her troubles on herself, wanting both Linton & Heathcliff & trying to ultimately have them both.

 

I also wonder had she survived the birth of her daughter and lived to raise her, what kind of a mother she would have been.  A jealous one, I suspect.  I doubt she would have liked the competition for the love and attention of Linton or anyone else around her.

 

Does anyone else have thoughts regarding Catherine?

Frequent Contributor
lilacbouquet
Posts: 104
Registered: ‎11-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Yes, sometimes I need to open up a browser and go to dictionary.com to look something up! It doesn't happen too often; I'd like to say that I have an above average understanding of vocabulary, but sometimes I come across something that I just can't figure out, haha. I'd love to own a desk dictionary, but it's an investment I've yet to make.

 

As for the pace of the book, I think that the first time I read it I was totally bored by the beginning part with Mr. Lockwood. This time, though, I was enjoying it. I even chuckled a little at the bit with him and the dogs - poor guy!


Omnifox wrote:

Same as with fellow members I have yet to read or see any of the movies. At first I was finding it hard to get intrested in the book, especially with the first few chapters. I have only made it about halfway through but now I am finding it hard to put down. Once the narrative switched to the housekeeper and we are getting the history it is really engrossing. Tess I felt grabbed you right away and this book took a bit to get started but so far I really like it.

 

Just a side note does anyone else use help while reading the books such as study guides, dictionarys etc. ? I find them helpful plus Everyman and Connie help also!! :]


 

- Emily
"The test of literature is, I suppose, whether we ourselves live more intensely for the reading of it." - Elizabeth Drew
Inspired Contributor
PhoebesMom
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎01-05-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Here is an interesting link to an essay re: Heathcliff as a Byronic Hero:

http://thebrontesoul.wetpaint.com/page/Byronic+Hero?t=anon

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Thanks for posting that.  I found it a bit amateurish, as though written for a high school assignment, and it didn't really develop the idea of Heatcliff as a Byronic hero, it just said up front that he was and tried to give justifications.

 

For me, it didn't really hold water.  Byronic villain, yes.  But a hero should have some heroic qualities, even a Byronic hero.  Heathcliff is, if not pure evil, at least substantial evil.  

 

But I admit that WH is one of my less favorite classic novels. I've read it several times trying to figure out why it is so celebrated, but it escapes me.  But maybe this film will give me a better idea.  

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Contributor
Happy29fan
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎05-16-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

This is also my first time reading Wuthering Heights.  I am just about half way through and hope to be finished by this weekend when the first part of the movie is shown.  I recently bought myself an electronic dictionary to carry around with me while I'm reading.  Prior to this when I came across a word I did not know, I would tell myself I would look it up later, but you know how that goes.  I was never near a dictionary when I needed it!  I love my electronic dictionary because it's about the size of a purse size calculator and I can carry it anywhere.  It sure beats lugging around a big heavy dictionary.  I also like to look at additional information about the book, author, time period, etc. on the web.  I found this website, which has a lot of interesting information about Wuthering Heights.

 

Kelly

 

 


Omnifox wrote:

Same as with fellow members I have yet to read or see any of the movies. At first I was finding it hard to get intrested in the book, especially with the first few chapters. I have only made it about halfway through but now I am finding it hard to put down. Once the narrative switched to the housekeeper and we are getting the history it is really engrossing. Tess I felt grabbed you right away and this book took a bit to get started but so far I really like it.

 

Just a side note does anyone else use help while reading the books such as study guides, dictionarys etc. ? I find them helpful plus Everyman and Connie help also!! :]


 

 
Inspired Contributor
PhoebesMom
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎01-05-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

Happy29fan asked:

 

Just a side note does anyone else use help while reading the books such as study guides, dictionarys etc. ? I find them helpful plus Everyman and Connie help also!! :]

     _____________________________________________________________

 

I do use a dictionary sometimes, also the internet at times.  I also have a book I picked up at B&N a couple of years ago:  "What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew:  From Fox Hunting to Whist - the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England" by Daniel Pool.  I have found it helpful from time to time, though it does have more than a few mistakes and typos.

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

I keep a basic dictionary right on my desk at all times.  For more difficult questions, the OED is just two steps away.  I use several reference books fairly frequently; the Encyclopedia Brittanica 11th edition is on the next shelves over from the OED, and I also frequently (at least several times a week) check something in the Oxford Classical Dictionary for classical questions and the Oxford Companions to English Literature, American Literature, British History, American History, and the Classical World. Those Companions I find are very useful for quick questions where I don't need an in depth answer, or where I'm just starting to look into a question.  There are a lot of times where I have a partial memory of something relevant but need a quick hit on a reference book to bring it fully back into memory.  It wasn't that way thirty years ago, but that was thirty years ago!


PhoebesMom wrote:

Happy29fan asked:

 

Just a side note does anyone else use help while reading the books such as study guides, dictionarys etc. ? I find them helpful plus Everyman and Connie help also!! :]

     _____________________________________________________________

 

I do use a dictionary sometimes, also the internet at times.  I also have a book I picked up at B&N a couple of years ago:  "What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew:  From Fox Hunting to Whist - the Facts of Daily Life in Nineteenth-Century England" by Daniel Pool.  I have found it helpful from time to time, though it does have more than a few mistakes and typos.


 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

[ Edited ]

Omnifox wrote:

Same as with fellow members I have yet to read or see any of the movies. At first I was finding it hard to get intrested in the book, especially with the first few chapters. I have only made it about halfway through but now I am finding it hard to put down. Once the narrative switched to the housekeeper and we are getting the history it is really engrossing. Tess I felt grabbed you right away and this book took a bit to get started but so far I really like it.

 

Just a side note does anyone else use help while reading the books such as study guides, dictionarys etc. ? I find them helpful plus Everyman and Connie help also!! :]


 

I think that anything that enhances your understanding and enjoyment is a helpful aid, Omni.  I'm glad I'm of any help to you at all, too--thanks!  The only thing I'd caution about guides, etc. is that I'd try to have my own interpretation of what I'm reading first, then seek out help.  Sometimes the guides can decide things one way, when it's really more open to one's own views than that.  An example would be a guide that assumes Tess is raped, for example.  That may be the pervailing opinion among most scholars and readers (or not--depending on whom you read), but I'd want my first reader to form his/her own opinion of ambiguous points first.  Also, if you can argue an interpretation from the text all the way through, then it's valid.  I wouldn't like to see a reader say something like, "Oh, I must have read that wrong because the guide or so-and-so reads it differently."  The trick is to learn to read closely for oneself, of course, which is an ongoing process, a skill like anything else.  I think reading guides can be most useful in clarifying plot when a passage is rich (or dense!) and one finds oneself wondering what is going on.  Then you go back to the original and test that plot description against what you read in the passage yourself, word for word.

 

I hope this makes any kind of sense! 

Message Edited by ConnieK on 01-15-2009 09:40 AM
~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)


PhoebesMom wrote:

This was my second reading of Wuthering Heights.  Again, I find that, like Nelly Dean, as Catherine grew older and more self-centered rather than less, I found it hard to like her or have much sympathy towards her.  I feel that she brought her troubles on herself, wanting both Linton & Heathcliff & trying to ultimately have them both.

 

I also wonder had she survived the birth of her daughter and lived to raise her, what kind of a mother she would have been.  A jealous one, I suspect.  I doubt she would have liked the competition for the love and attention of Linton or anyone else around her.

 

Does anyone else have thoughts regarding Catherine?


 

My concept of Catherine is that she is a spoiled child, from her girlhood right up through her death.  She is completely self-centered and does not care about anyone except herself and Heathcliff.  And even that is self-centered, because, as she says to Nelly, "I am Heathcliff!"  She really only cares about even Heathcliff when it suits her.  After staying at the Grange and seeing more genteel people, she first thought is still for Heathcliff when she returns to the Heights, but when she sees him, his grubbiness impresses her in a new way and she is a bit put off.  Her jealousy of Isabella, once Heathcliff starts paying attention to her, is quite pathetic.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

My concept of Catherine is that she is a spoiled child, from her girlhood right up through her death.  She is completely self-centered and does not care about anyone except herself and Heathcliff.

 

If you believe the perhaps premise that Catherine comes back to haunt Heathcliffe to his death, there is an argument to be made, which I will make after we see the scene, that she is thinking of others than herself at the time.  

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)


Everyman wrote:

My concept of Catherine is that she is a spoiled child, from her girlhood right up through her death.  She is completely self-centered and does not care about anyone except herself and Heathcliff.

 

If you believe the perhaps premise that Catherine comes back to haunt Heathcliffe to his death, there is an argument to be made, which I will make after we see the scene, that she is thinking of others than herself at the time.  


 

Nah, she's just cold and wants to come in where it's warm...
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grand Dame of the Land of Oz, Duchess of Fantasia, in the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia; also, Poet Laureate of the Kingdom of Wordsmithonia
Scribe
Laurel
Posts: 5,747
Registered: ‎10-29-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

I think the value of this book, besides its being a good story astonishingly well told, is its exploration of whether bad decisions and bad feelings have to continue through future generations. It's an amazing chronicle of jealousy, wrath, class hatreds, vengeance, and love.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
Inspired Contributor
JohnP51
Posts: 1,294
Registered: ‎12-31-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Wuthering Heights: The Book (spoilers, ok)

I think Heathcliff comes under the classification of "sociopath". The more I read the more I believe so. An early example of that was the issue of the new ponies that the two boys received. Heathcliff's turned up lame so he worked his evil to swap ponies with Hinton. In the process, Heathcliff received a battering but he got what he wanted in the end. No matter who gets hurt and no matter what he has to do to get what he wants. I'm at the point in the book where Isabella is about to be ensared in his web, poor girl.

 

The pattern repeats itself time and again with his goal being to own all of Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange and the surrounding land. Sociopath.

John

"Books are for people who wish they were somewhere else." ~ Mark Twain