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pastorjeffcma
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

I am not one to read a lot of fiction. But since you asked:

 

 

This is one I have been working on for some time but it tends to get interrupted quite often.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you happen to be someone who wants to do some serious reading about the Bible this may be one you want to consider (or anything else by D.A. Carson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This title caught my attention. The tone is a little softer than one has been accustomed to hearing.

 

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Peppermill
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

[ Edited ]

 


pastorjeffcma wrote:

 

 

If you happen to be someone who wants to do some serious reading about the Bible this may be one you want to consider (or anything else by D.A. Carson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This title caught my attention. The tone is a little softer than one has been accustomed to hearing.

 


 

Pastor Jeff -- Thanks for these!  I am adding them to my list of books to check out for consideration to be read.  I'm unfamiliar with either of these authors, but, in a brief check, their credentials sound solid and impressive.

 

There is a thread on this board requesting suggestions about Christian writing.  You may want to add these as suggestions

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pastorjeffcma
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

Anything by Don Carson is going to be worth digging into--and it will be digging. Also, lest I be misunderstood, The Little Book of Atheist Spirituality is not Christian--it is written by an atheist. As I said it has a softer tone that Dawkins, Harris, Hitchens, etc., but it is still atheist in its perspective. I am reading it for a couple of reasons. First, the title caught my attention when I saw it being described in another setting. Secondly, I interact with a few atheists on my blog (very respectfully I might add) so it will be quite the discussion starter I am sure. Plus I am a student of apologetics so I will appreciate it from that perspective also. Just wanted to let you know.

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Peppermill
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

 


pastorjeffcma wrote:

Anything by Don Carson is going to be worth digging into--and it will be digging. ...Plus I am a student of apologetics so I will appreciate it from that perspective also. Just wanted to let you know.


Pastor Jeff -- Do you include Brueggemann and Niebuhr and  Robert McAfee Brown on your reading lists?

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pastorjeffcma
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

The answer to your question probably depends on who the reading list is for. If you meant the list of books that I would read, then the answer would be a qualified yes. I say qualified for these reason. Even though I would not line up with his view on the authority of Scripture I do appreciate his work on Jeremiah--To Build, To Plant and The Theology of the Book of Jeremiah. I am very interested in his recent work on the Middle East conflict, Fatal Embrace: Christians, Jews, and the Search for Peace in the Holy Land. However, for the same reason I might be a little less free to recommend him to others across the board--depending on their background.

 

I am assuming you meant Reinhold Neihbur (or did you mean Richard also?). While I certainly have great respect for these men as scholars I would have significant theological differences. If you are interested in Christ and Culture you might like to take a look at D.A. Carson's Christ and Culture Revisited. Back to the reading list question--If I were compiling a list of major important texts in theology and ethics then both of these men (Brueggemann and Neibuhr) would have to be represented.

 

Brown--to be honest I've done very little with him. Many years ago I used his Unexpected News: Reading the Bible Through Third World Eyes, which made for a very lively small group discussion and I have referenced many times since then and certainly have recommended it now and then.

 

That was a very long answer to a very short question. Hope that answered what you were asking. You may have just wanted a simple yes or no. :smileyhappy:

 

 

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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

[ Edited ]

 


pastorjeffcma wrote:

The answer to your question probably depends on who the reading list is for. If you meant the list of books that I would read, then the answer would be a qualified yes. I say qualified for these reason. Even though I would not line up with his view on the authority of Scripture I do appreciate his work on Jeremiah--To Build, To Plant and The Theology of the Book of Jeremiah. I am very interested in his recent work on the Middle East conflict, Fatal Embrace: Christians, Jews, and the Search for Peace in the Holy Land. However, for the same reason I might be a little less free to recommend him to others across the board--depending on their background.

 

I am assuming you meant Reinhold Neihbur (or did you mean Richard also?). While I certainly have great respect for these men as scholars I would have significant theological differences. If you are interested in Christ and Culture, you might like to take a look at D.A. Carson's Christ and Culture Revisited. Back to the reading list question--If I were compiling a list of major important texts in theology and ethics then both of these men (Brueggemann and Neibuhr) would have to be represented.

 

Brown--to be honest I've done very little with him. Many years ago I used his Unexpected News: Reading the Bible Through Third World Eyes , which made for a very lively small group discussion and I have referenced many times since then and certainly have recommended it now and then.

 

That was a very long answer to a very short question. Hope that answered what you were asking. You may have just wanted a simple yes or no. :smileyhappy:

 

 


No, that was a delightful answer.  I was just sort of exploring where our exposure to certain theologians might overlap.  I have not read deeply in any of these -- theology/religion is not my field, but I do touch upon these three, among several others, from time to time, both from my own collection and from participants in small groups and from speakers who do spend more time on the subjects than I.  A small group of us recently spent several months with Reinhold Neibuhr's The Nature and Destiny of Man -- although at the moment I couldn't summarize what I learned!  I have used several of Brueggemann's works through the years, including some of his texts on the Old Testament, Genesis, and the Psalms. I have also heard lectures based on Richard Neibuhr and have an acquaintance who regularly consults Brown when an interesting question on Biblical translations or meaning arises.  (I believe Fatal Embrace is Mark Braverton?)

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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pastorjeffcma
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

You are correct. I had to recheck and see why I connected Brueggemann to that book in my mind. He wrote the forward. Thanks for the correction. It still sounds like a book I would be interesting in reading.

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Peppermill
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

 


pastorjeffcma wrote:

You are correct. I had to recheck and see why I connected Brueggemann to that book in my mind. He wrote the forward. Thanks for the correction. It still sounds like a book I would be interesting in reading.


Ah, I didn't see that!  Thx.  It sounds interesting.  Let us know if you get to it?

 

 

 

Fatal Embrace  by Mark Braverman

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Nallia
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Peppermill
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

There is a 2011 thread started.  Add an entry and IT will float to the top instead of this 2010 thread.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy