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Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

I just finished two great urban fantasy/paranormal books

 

Hells Bell's by Paul Magrs

 

and

 

A Madness of Angels 

 

 

 

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Distinguished Wordsmith
pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

[ Edited ]

The Witch Doctor's Wife  Reading this one for my face to face book club. In addition to the story the author starts each chapter with some interesting cultural tidbits about the Congo during the 1950s.

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Urbanitra
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎02-06-2010
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

I just finished "oPtion$-The Secret Diary of Steve Jobs" a parody written by the fake Steve Jobs (aka Danial Lyons). This book made me laugh out loud!

Distinguished Bibliophile
Ryan_G
Posts: 3,295
Registered: ‎10-24-2008
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

The Dragon Scroll (Sugawara Akitada Series #3) 

 

Not sure why the product info says this is the 3rd book in the series when it's actually the first.

 

Regardless I'm really enjoying it so far.

"I am half sick of shadows" The Lady of Shalott

http://wordsmithonia.blogspot.com
Author
R_E_Conary
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎01-24-2010
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

Just started:

 

 

 

Buried Strangers 

 

Set in Brazil, this is Gage's second mystery featuring Chief Inspector Mario Silva and his investigative team.

 

A dog digs up a bone in a field. It's human. Searching for the body, investigators find a whole recent hidden cemetery. Why is it here? Who were these people?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recently finished:

 

 

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium Trilogy Series #1) 

 

 

This is every bit as good as I had heard. Too bad Larsson died and never saw the success of his trilogy. Am looking forward to reading the others.

 

Particularly like Lisbeth Salander's attitude toward those who abuse women: "I just think that it's pathetic that creeps always have to have someone else to blame." I agree with her. Not everyone who grows up in bad situations turns into a predatory creep. Each makes his or her own choice.

 

 

 

REConary

Lifes a Bitch. So am I. Rachel Cord. P.I. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

[ Edited ]

 


R_E_Conary wrote (edited):

 

Recently finished:

 

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium Trilogy Series #1) by Steig Larsson

 

 

This is every bit as good as I had heard. Too bad Larsson died and never saw the success of his trilogy. Am looking forward to reading the others.

 

Particularly like Lisbeth Salander's attitude toward those who abuse women: "I just think that it's pathetic that creeps always have to have someone else to blame." I agree with her. Not everyone who grows up in bad situations turns into a predatory creep. Each makes his or her own choice.

 

 


This is every bit as good as I had heard.

 

I quite agree.  I have gone so far as to suggest Lisbeth Salander is as interesting a fictional character as Thackeray's Becky Sharp, just one belonging to the 21st century rather than the 19th.  (I finished TGWTDT a week or two ago -- in one long, protracted read where I didn't tear myself away from the action.)

 

In quite another vein, I am reading

 

Beowulf, translated by Seamus Heaney, with the Epics board.  I am quite taken with this edition, whose illustrations are edited by John Niles.  It has been years since I have broached this epic.  Perhaps Laurel's leading us through The Iliad and The Odyssey have helped, but this time it seems magnificent and virile.  It is also a case where the illustrations are adding greatly to the pleasure.

 

 

 

 

Joseph on the Religion and Spirituality board talked me into checking Rapture Ready!  by Daniel Radosh out of my local library, albeit not into making a purchase. :smileysurprised:  I haven't read very far yet, but I can see where the interest will lie.

 

Rapture Ready!  (here is the paperback edition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also, in progress, this for the LbW board, is:

 

Although I still struggle with finishing the final chapters of Vanity Fair -- I have skimmed for the plot resolution, but want to savor the writing, the current "piece for pleasure" is

 

Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel.  I managed to be on the right spot in the queue for a CD copy from our library system.  Mantel spins quite a story and can certainly string words together as she transports her reader/listener into the Tudor world of Thomas Cromwell, Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, Thomas More, Cardinal Wolsey, Thomas Cranmer and numerous other supporting characters.  You probably know this won the Man-Booker Prize for 2009.  I don't know that I should have the patience to read it, although what time I spent with her earlier book on the French Revolution suggests that her chatty, story-telling, anecdote within anecdote style is rather easy and quick to read.  Whatever, I am certainly enjoying Wolf Hall in audio form.  A pleasant way to refresh oneself on the history one quasi remembers -- if more interested in story than necessarily historical accuracy, despite however much research Mantel may have done.

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Inspired Contributor
books4life48
Posts: 168
Registered: ‎12-06-2009
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

I just finished THIRST No.1 by christopher pike and now am currently reading THIRST No.2. Really good!! Praise to Christopher Pike for writing such wonderful novels.

Thirst No. 2 

 

Thirst No. 1  

~Yes*We*Have*No*Bananas~ XD
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debbook
Posts: 1,823
Registered: ‎05-03-2008
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Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

 


pjpick wrote:

The Witch Doctor's Wife  Reading this one for my face to face book club. In addition to the story the author starts each chapter with some interesting cultural tidbits about the Congo during the 1950s.


 

I put this on hold at my library- looks good

 

A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
"bookmagic418.blogspot.com
Author
R_E_Conary
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎01-24-2010

Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

Peppermill,

 

I read Seamus Heaney's version of BEOWULF last year and loved it. You might want to try

 

 

 

The Tain 

 

Translated by Ciaran Carson

 

This is Heroic Fantasy at its best.

 

The Táin is Ireland's heroic fantasy of political intrigue, trickery, deceit, and feats of individual daring on a par with the Iliad. The tale's iconic hero, Cú Chulainn (Hound of Culann), a young, hot-tempered, nearly invincible warrior like Achilles, stands alone against the invading armies of Ireland protecting Ulster and the North. 

The story, first recorded between the sixth and eighth centuries from oral tales, is a simple one. Medb, queen of Connacht, is jealous that her husband's riches outnumber her own by one prize bull. There's a bull of equal value in neighboring Ulster. Medb and her husband, Ailill, connive to steal the bull. Although all of the warriors of Ulster are bed-ridden by an annual curse, Medb and Ailill take no chances for failure. In secret alliances, they offer their fair daughter, Finnabair, to every leader and king who'll bring an army to help them. And come they do, like the Greeks rushing to Troy for Helen. The one flaw in their plan is the seventeen-year-old Ulster hero, Cú Chulainn. Apparently, the beardless boy is too young to be afflicted by "The Curse," and he harries and stalls the invaders until the Ulster warriors recover and can join in the final battle. 

Cú is the prototype of superheroes from Conan to Wolverine. His rages puff him up like the Hulk that no horde can withstand. Yet he'll fight with all the chivalry of a Dumas' hero in single combat: "'It's your choice of weapons until nightfall,' said Cú, `for you were first at the ford.'" The pathos of war is particularly poignant when Cú battles his foster brother, Fer Diad. 

Fer Diad is tricked into fighting Cú; Mebd and Ailill tell him lies that Cú had besmirched his honor, and they offer him their daughter (as they had to nearly everyone else) as a reward. 

Cú and Fer Diad fight for several days, meeting each morning to let one or the other choose the weapon and fighting until night; then sharing food and succor as their horses grazed together and their charioteers shared the same fire. "For every amulet and spell and charm that was laid on Cú Chulainn's cuts and gashes, he sent the same to Fer Diad on the south side of the ford. And for every piece of food, and pleasant, wholesome and reviving drink that the men of Ireland gave Fer Diad, he sent the same to Cú Chulainn." 

Their battle brings to mind two modern instances: 

Winfield Scott Hancock and Lewis Addison Armistead, close friends and soldiers before the Civil War, bid each other tearful farewells after the fall of Ft. Sumter only to come together again on opposite sides during Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg. Wounded, Armistead's only concern is for his friend Hancock, and hearing that Hancock has also been wounded mournfully cries, "Not both of us on the same day." 

The "Christmas Truce," 1914: On Christmas eve and Christmas day, British and German troops, who had been fighting and killing each other daily, take a momentary pause from chaos. Spontaneously, along the front lines, they come together in comradeship sharing songs, stories, food and drink in "no man's land," knowing full well that afterward they would have to return to slaughter. 

The Táin is a wonderful tale of intrigue, honor, sacrifice and the worthlessness of war.

 

Sorry, everyone, for getting sidetracked off the mystery thread, but IMHO The Tain is as fine a mystery and thriller as you can find.

 

REConary

Lifes a Bitch. So am I. Rachel Cord. P.I. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: 2010- What Are You Reading?

REConary -- thx for the heads up!  May I suggest you post it (The Tain) in the Mead Hall thread on the Epics board as well.

 

Would also enjoy hearing additional comments n Beowulf over there.

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy