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Distinguished Wordsmith
pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry


Htom_Serveaux wrote:

Well, it's not a book per se, but "Flowers for Algernon" (not the novelized version, that loses its punch if you ask me, and I just did).  40 years on and I can't recall it too closely without tearing up.

 

If it's more recent you want, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime".  Wept.  Like a baby.  And I don't care who knows.... :-)


Interesting...I totally did not get that at all from "The Curious..." I think I was too entrenched in my dislike of the book to invest much other emotion in it. I found the thought processes very hard to adapt too (which was probably the point of the book). Now I'm "curious" and it makes me want to go back and read the book...er, well maybe not all that much.

 

Inspired Correspondent
Htom_Serveaux
Posts: 146
Registered: ‎03-13-2010
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry

 


pjpick wrote:

Htom_Serveaux wrote:

Well, it's not a book per se, but "Flowers for Algernon" (not the novelized version, that loses its punch if you ask me, and I just did).  40 years on and I can't recall it too closely without tearing up.

 

If it's more recent you want, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime".  Wept.  Like a baby.  And I don't care who knows.... :-)


Interesting...I totally did not get that at all from "The Curious..." I think I was too entrenched in my dislike of the book to invest much other emotion in it. I found the thought processes very hard to adapt too (which was probably the point of the book). Now I'm "curious" and it makes me want to go back and read the book...er, well maybe not all that much.

 


 

While I'm more or less "fully functional" in public, my dislike of human contact and sometimes overwhelming desire to not be in public view gave me what might be a more sympathetic (approaching empathic) connection to the main character.

 

You're not alone, however. My wife gave it a big "meh" as well.

Distinguished Wordsmith
pjpick
Posts: 1,043
Registered: ‎03-16-2007
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry


Htom_Serveaux wrote:

 


pjpick wrote:

Htom_Serveaux wrote:

Well, it's not a book per se, but "Flowers for Algernon" (not the novelized version, that loses its punch if you ask me, and I just did).  40 years on and I can't recall it too closely without tearing up.

 

If it's more recent you want, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime".  Wept.  Like a baby.  And I don't care who knows.... :-)


Interesting...I totally did not get that at all from "The Curious..." I think I was too entrenched in my dislike of the book to invest much other emotion in it. I found the thought processes very hard to adapt too (which was probably the point of the book). Now I'm "curious" and it makes me want to go back and read the book...er, well maybe not all that much.

 


 

While I'm more or less "fully functional" in public, my dislike of human contact and sometimes overwhelming desire to not be in public view gave me what might be a more sympathetic (approaching empathic) connection to the main character.

 

You're not alone, however. My wife gave it a big "meh" as well.


No wonder it made you cry! It sure hit home,then. There were three of us (out of six) in my book club who found the book difficult to read. Oddly enough, all three of us were nurses so I'm sure it had to do a lot with our work processes. (thanks for including your wifes opinion, LOL!) Most responses I've heard about this book are "It's wonderful!" etc. And I'm just perplexed so thank your wife for me.:smileyhappy:

 

While I was emotionally torn with Falling Leaves and suspect I could identify with the character whereas a few of my friends were totally frustrated with her.  But others felt for her too. Your response has gotten me to wonder at the birth order of those who liked it and those who didn't. Gosh, wish I could remember which was which it's been a long time since I've read it.

Contributor
NookieStackhouse
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎01-15-2011
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry

Flowers for Algernon is a great book. I've read it multiple times.

Inspired Correspondent
Mupples
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎03-08-2010

Re: A Book That Made You Cry

[ Edited ]

The Bronze Horseman 

 

This was sad in different ways (war, devastation, death etc), but I cried because I connected so well with the main character Tanya. It never happened before or since, but there was something with the main characters and their relationship that reminded me of the way my husband and I are that resonanted. My first taste of how powerful literature can be when it really digs into your core.

Frequent Contributor
CasperAZ
Posts: 1,164
Registered: ‎01-01-2011

Re: A Book That Made You Cry

I was reading the posts and when literature does hit a personal note and the reader associates character events that are similar to theirs, tears can well up in that person's eyes.  That's understandable and sometimes crying is an outlet to let everything out when someone has something pent up inside.

"The NOOKcolor Aficionado"
New User
kdj131
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-17-2011
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry

Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah.

Kim J
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lindsey_BB
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎11-23-2009
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry

[ Edited ]

I read John Grisham's "The Chamber" when I was a Freshman in HS.  It is the only book that I remember made me cry.

 

Contributor
Susie_Schweiger
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎01-23-2011
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry

 

 

                                           The Notebook 

Reading about Noah and Allie's love story made cry,especially since I know someone in my family with Alzheimers.  I honestly think anything  Nick Spark's written has made me tear up. I've also read "A Walk To Remember" "Dear John" and "Message In A Bottle" Any other books you've read that are similar to"The Notebook"?

 

 

 

"For beautiful eyes, look for the good in others; for beautiful lips, speak only words of kindness; and for poise, walk with the knowledge that you are never alone."
— Audrey Hepburn
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kelly-leigh
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎01-23-2011
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Re: A Book That Made You Cry

Every single time I read the ending of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, I cry. I just can't control it! I got so invested the characters, and the ending was so beautifully written.

 

At the beginning of the school year (I'm a junior in high school) I remember tearing up after school in the library while reading Interpreter of Maladies. Aside from 1984 and The Catcher in the Rye, that was my favorite required reading.

In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act. -George Orwell