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patgolfneb
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
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Re: Are You A Rereader?

I rarely read books again. If a book really connects emotionally or the humor is exceptional I will after a few years have passed.
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NookaholicAC
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎04-27-2012
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Re: Are You A Rereader?

 I reread the Harry Potter books, Twilight series, and my all time fave book, The Davinci Code, many times over. Oddly enough, that was before I had my Nook. Now, since I have so many books available at my fingertips, I choose not to reread, but read as many new books as I can. So many out there and so little time. LOL

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AliciaDean_1835
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎05-20-2011
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Re: Are You A Rereader?

When I was younger, I was a rereader. These days, I'm so busy it's difficult to read the books in my TBR pile even once, but I am definitely a fan of rereading. Like someone else said, you miss things the first time around, and besides, if you really love the world the author has created, really love the characters, it makes sense to want to visit them again.

Alicia Dean
Author of Suspense and Paranormal
aka Winter Frost - Lady in the Mist, a Gothic Mystery Novella
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Are You A Rereader?

I'll make a deliberately challenging comment here:

 

If you are not re-reading, are you reading "good enough" literature?  And that by the standards and hopes and uses of reading for yourself.

 

I am finding that as I tackle more and more classics, I must reread if I even remotely hope to savor the ideas, the language, the characters, the development of the plot. 

 

But, boy, is it turning out to be worth it, IMHO, if nothing else, just for my own sense of a different kind of joy in the experience of reading.

 

(For most of my life, I had an attitude of there is too much to read to ever reread.  Maybe I have just reached the point of knowing I can never read all that I shoud like, but there is much wealth to be gained by repeated "conversations" with certain books.)

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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keriflur
Posts: 6,837
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Are You A Rereader?

[ Edited ]

Peppermill wrote:

I'll make a deliberately challenging comment here:

 

If you are not re-reading, are you reading "good enough" literature?  And that by the standards and hopes and uses of reading for yourself.

 

I am finding that as I tackle more and more classics, I must reread if I even remotely hope to savor the ideas, the language, the characters, the development of the plot. 

 

But, boy, is it turning out to be worth it, IMHO, if nothing else, just for my own sense of a different kind of joy in the experience of reading.

 

(For most of my life, I had an attitude of there is too much to read to ever reread.  Maybe I have just reached the point of knowing I can never read all that I shoud like, but there is much wealth to be gained by repeated "conversations" with certain books.)


I do re-read.  I've actually re-read quite a bit this year.

 

That said, to me, a good book is not one that I have to re-read.  It's one that makes it's impact the first time around, where the writer is clear and concise yet vivid and subtle.  There's a fine line between being subtle and being vague, between being complex and being confusing, but IMO good literature is always the former in both cases, and never the latter.  So I re-read the books that I love, to love them more, and to see how they're structured (as a writer, I don't just want to know this, I need to know this).

 

There are some classics that I love.  There are probably many more that I will love once I read them.  But I'm past the point of reading books simply because they're classics.  Instead I read everything, classics and otherwise, like slush - if it holds me, I keep going, but if an author is obtuse or tangental, I'm out the door.*  So there are quite a few classics I'll likely never finish, and quite a few I'll never start (for example, anything by Dickens that I haven't already been forced to read).

 

*I hold nothing against these folks, and nothing against those who love their work.  There was a time when the popular style of writing was long, drawn out beginnings loaded with backstory and filled with beautifully articulated travels down roads to nowhere.  It's just not what I want to read.

 

Life is too short for bad books.

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bobstro
Posts: 4,075
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: Are You A Rereader?

[ Edited ]

keriflur wrote:

[...] So there are quite a few classics I'll likely never finish, and quite a few I'll never start (for example, anything by Dickens that I haven't already been forced to read).


I managed to muddle through school without reading most of what I was supposed to, and I've never felt the urge to "complete" myself by going through the classics now. I have, however, started reading Dickens' work as a dystopian prediction of what life will be like if certain political themes are taken to extremes. Make an appropriate mental substitution of technology here and there, and some of the lines sound like quotes grabbed from the nightly news. 

 

The only books I regularly re-read are Douglas Adams', simply because I forget some of the great lines.

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Irishelf
Posts: 242
Registered: ‎07-20-2011
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Re: Are You A Rereader?

I reread books I loved the first time around.  I would love to get the ebook version of some of them (like Erin Hunter's "Warriors" series), but cannot afford to do so.  I hope prices go down in the future so I can afford it-because of my visual impairment, ebooks are much easier for me to read.  I am not really into classics (especially Shakespeare), but there were some books I read in school that I would love to get as an ebook-unfortunately they are either too expensive or not available.  "Animal Farm", "Lord of the Flies", "Martian Chronicles", and "The Illustrated Man" are just a few of those I wouldn't mind rereading.  The are also some horror books I would reread if I could get them as ebooks but so far no one has issued books by my favorite horror writers as ebooks (Ruby Jean Jenson, Clare McNally, and Pat Graverson to name a few).  Sigh!

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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,308
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: Are You A Rereader?


Irishelf wrote:

I reread books I loved the first time around.  I would love to get the ebook version of some of them (like Erin Hunter's "Warriors" series), but cannot afford to do so.  I hope prices go down in the future so I can afford it-because of my visual impairment, ebooks are much easier for me to read.  I am not really into classics (especially Shakespeare), but there were some books I read in school that I would love to get as an ebook-unfortunately they are either too expensive or not available.  "Animal Farm", "Lord of the Flies", "Martian Chronicles", and "The Illustrated Man" are just a few of those I wouldn't mind rereading.  The are also some horror books I would reread if I could get them as ebooks but so far no one has issued books by my favorite horror writers as ebooks (Ruby Jean Jenson, Clare McNally, and Pat Graverson to name a few).  Sigh!


There are a bunch of mid-century classics that you can't get, due to the rights being in fuzzy status or the owners actually resistant to e-books.  No Catcher in the Rye, for example, or To Kill a Mockingbird

 

Amusingly, a number of older SF writers like Bradbury are/were to some extent luddites on new technology.  Bradbury only allowed Fahrenheit 451 to be released digitally because his publisher demanded it in order to renew the contract on the paper version.  The rest of his works will have to wait for one of his heirs to allow digital publication.

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keriflur
Posts: 6,837
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Are You A Rereader?

Ugh, Catcher in the Rye.  *headesk*

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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,308
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: Are You A Rereader?


keriflur wrote:

Ugh, Catcher in the Rye.  *headesk*


Not to everyone's taste, but you have to acknowledge it's a significant book.  Speaking of which, I finally managed to push myself all the way through Naked Lunch.  Again, clearly a significant, groundbreaking book, but damn it's a lot of work to read.