Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Scribe
frantastk
Posts: 743
Registered: ‎06-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Barnes & Noble Is Not Doomed


sparky_80 wrote:

Sure, there will be a demand for DTB's, but will it be enough to make the large B&N brick and mortar stores profitable enough to remain open?    

 

5 years ago, I would visit a B&N store at least 20 times a year.  Now, it's less than 10.  I used to buy an armload full of books.  Now, I'm only buying reference books.  I may browse some books to add to my e-reading list.

 

How about the others on this list?  Do you still frequent the B&N stores?  Do you still spend as much money as you did 5 years ago?

 

 


I go in to a book store more often than I did 5 years ago, but that's partly because now my kids are a bit older so it's easier for me to go out on my own now than it was 5 years ago. (Five years ago, I had an infant, a toddler, and a 6 year old with autism who couldn't deal with crowds of people in stores.) I've always taken my kids to bookstores frequently. It's their most requested outing. I also spend more money on books now. I buy both dtb and ebooks. I buy paper books when I want something for my bookshelf or something with lots of pictures and charts. I cannot look at knitting books on a tablet. I've tried using them on my computer and I have hundreds of pdf knitting patterns/books, but when I want to use the patterns I need to print them out. I will say that may change when I finally get around to getting a tablet. Right now there are no future plans to do that, though. It seems that I've replaced my paperback book buying with ebooks. I rarely bought hard cover novels unless I was desperate to read something (almost all my hard covers were gifts or textbooks from our homeschooling days).

 

I will say that my kids prefer paper. I've asked and for them it seems to be a sensory thing. Kids like to touch. My kids are 11, 9, and 5, so maybe younger than the kids in the studies Keri was talking about. My 9 year old will read on the nook if it's a book we don't have in paper (the first 4 Harry Potter books, we have all the classics in ebook and only some in paper). She has no problem reading with the nook, she just likes having the weight of the book to hold and the physical pages to touch. My 11 year old techie loves the ereader. He reads more on it than the other two. My 5 year old likes to sit in the middle of the floor surrounded by stacks of books. Also, her books all still have colour illustrations, though she does have some ebooks she loves to read. (She's in love with the black and white illustrations in Alice in Wonderland and will sit for ages flipping pages on the nook to look at them.)

Nallia
Posts: 4,758
Topics: 125
Kudos: 3,236
Solutions: 4
Registered: ‎02-15-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Barnes & Noble Is Not Doomed

I can't speak for anyone else, but yes, I would. I have happily forked over $25-35 for hardcovers for over 20 years and I don't see that changing anytime soon, if ever.
Wordsmith
doncr
Posts: 493
Registered: ‎12-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Barnes & Noble Is Not Doomed

I used to love to go to the BN, Borders, and even my public library, but no longer. 

 

Borders is OOB. BN has sadly become a daycare center where oblivious moms on cellphones let their kids run amok.   My public library is full of noisy teens meeting there to socialize.  I guess I'm too old-fashioned to expect reverence in places like this.

 

Anyway, I just shop online these days and when I find something interesting I'll reserve it at my local public library.  No more perusing the shelves and making impulsive purchases.  In fact, I rarely buy any books anymore. 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,715
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
0 Kudos

Re: Barnes & Noble Is Not Doomed

[ Edited ]
I tend to buy eBooks. My wife is adept at hunting down hard to find paper books online. Both of my (early to mid 20s) boys buy paper books, despite my efforts to buy them NOOKs. They watch Netflix on the NCs.
Doug_Pardee
Posts: 5,515
Kudos: 3,995
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
0 Kudos

It's ALL doomed! James Patterson is afraid so, anyway.

Paid advertisement on the back cover of The New York Times Book Review:

 

Paid advertisement on the back of the New York Times Book Review

 

Bibliophile
5ivedom
Posts: 3,544
Registered: ‎12-03-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Barnes & Noble Is Not Doomed

I buy hardcover for books i really like and sometimes where there is no price difference.

 

A few data points (just based on what I've noticed) -

 

1) Parents with kids prefer paper books.

 

2) Lots of people want paper copies of their favorite books.

 

3) Lots of people buy paper books in cases where they are travelling and/or can't use ereaders (bath, beach, airports).

 

4) Lot sof people like to have home libraries.

 

I think we've now switched to the opposite extreme.

 

When ebooks first came out people thought it would be

 

5% ebooks and 95% paper.

 

Now people think the opposite.

 

I think neither is the most likely outcome.

 

A split of 20-80 between paper and ebook to 40-60 between paper and ebook is more likely.

AlanNJ
Posts: 3,722
Topics: 64
Kudos: 1,518
Solutions: 0
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: It's ALL doomed! James Patterson is afraid so, anyway.


Doug_Pardee wrote:

Paid advertisement on the back cover of The New York Times Book Review:

 

Paid advertisement on the back of the New York Times Book Review

 


The fact that James Patterson endorses this is enough reason for me to stay with e-books.  I don't need advice from an author factory.

►Without order there is chaos◄
Distinguished Bibliophile
MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,170
Registered: ‎07-25-2011

Re: It's ALL doomed! James Patterson is afraid so, anyway.

Who will save us from ghostwritten formulaic literary pablum? It isn't the medium that matters, it's the quality of the content, and JP isn't helping there.
Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,549
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
0 Kudos

Re: It's ALL doomed! James Patterson is afraid so, anyway.

If JP is so concerned, why doesn't he do it?  He's certainly making enough bank to make a difference.

Distinguished Bibliophile
patgolfneb
Posts: 1,757
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
0 Kudos

Re: It's ALL doomed! James Patterson is afraid so, anyway.

These things are not a single issue. They are interdependent but long term to authors and readers whether it is an e book or DTB in form is less important than how access is maintained. Clearly fewer, probably smaller bookstores will be needed. Online market competition is an issue. Will a flood of inferior self published books leave fewer dollars for professional writers reducing their incomes? Will publishers importance decrease as writers self publish to retain a bigger share of income? Will publishers sell more e books direct? How many dollars will retailers self pub efforts take from traditional publishing? How will the various players respond to the changes. The bottom line anyone who claims they know what is going to happen wonderfull or woefull is deluded.