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FARIEQUEENE
Posts: 93
Registered: ‎09-23-2009

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

I have found in my barnes and noble we have a diverse cultural area, and a very large selection of black authors, perhaps it is demograpical.

"I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king."
Frequent Contributor
KD67
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎10-12-2010

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

First off,  I am not trying to start anything.  But, I don't understand the point of this.  Authors are Authors no matter what their Ancestry happens to be.  Why should there be a need for a special catagory based on their race?  Should there be a Polish American, Irish American, Japanese American, Caucasian American, Russian, Indian etc, demographic breakdown also?  If a book is fiction, then its fiction, non-fiction its non-fiction etc.  And just for the record I am of Cherokee/Irish decent but I am just an American and before that I am just a Human.

 

Sorry if I offend in anyway.

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Denice02
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-12-2010
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Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

Are you in a book club or do you just read own your own?  I am looking for a book club to join

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

 


KD67 wrote:

First off,  I am not trying to start anything.  But, I don't understand the point of this.  Authors are Authors no matter what their Ancestry happens to be.  Why should there be a need for a special catagory based on their race?  Should there be a Polish American, Irish American, Japanese American, Caucasian American, Russian, Indian etc, demographic breakdown also?  If a book is fiction, then its fiction, non-fiction its non-fiction etc.  And just for the record I am of Cherokee/Irish decent but I am just an American and before that I am just a Human.

 

Sorry if I offend in anyway.


 

I suspect the appropriateness of a separate category is a marketing question as much as it is a diversity question.  If there is a market for a particular grouping, it often behooves a seller to cater to it.

 

I love to read broadly across a multitude of authors.  Yet, I will say that I could pull several ethnic groupings of authors from my shelves.  Did I buy them that way?  Mostly only to the extent that my book group read Irish authors in March, Black literature in February, ....  But others may have other buying patterns and sellers can profit by responding.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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316
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎07-22-2011
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Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

YES!! THAT IS TRUE!! All AFRICAN AMERICAN BOOKS AND AUTHORS... ARE WAY MORE AT BARNES AND NOBLE THAN ANY OTHER SOURCE. BARNES AND NOBLE COST IS NORMALLY FIVE DOLLARS MORE THAN ANY OTHER STORE CHARGES.

I GOT A NOOK AS A BIRTHDAY GIFT AND HAVE NOT BEEN PLEASE AT ALL. BARNES AND NOBLE STAY HAVING TECH PROBLEMS WITH MY ACCOUNT AND THEY DO NOT SUPPORT ANY AFRICAN AMERICAN AUTHORS. THE AFRICAN AMERICAN/BLACK AUTHORS ARE LIMITED.

THEY ARE NOT THE GIVEN IN THE FREE FOR FRIDAYS! THEY ARE NOT FEATURED IN THE NOOK BLOG! BARNES AND NOBLE DON'T EVEN SUPPORT INDIE AUTHORS. WHY??

WHEN I LOG ON TO MY ACCOUNT BARNES AND NOBLE SUGGESTION EVERY BOOK THAT I WOULD NOT READ.... WHY B/C MAJORITY OF WHAT I READ ARE BLACK AUTHORS. I AM UPSET ABOUT THIS AND WISH MY GIFT WAS A KINDLE INSTEAD OF NOOK. I FEEL LIKE I'M GIVING MY HARD EARN MONEY TO A CORPORATION WHO DOES NOT CARE ABOUT AFRICAN AMERICAN/ BLACK PEOPLE. I HAVE TO MAKE SOME DECISIONS ON THIS B/C ITS NOT RIGHT OR FAIR. I CAN'T KEEP SUPPORTING BARNES AND NOBLE.
316
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316
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎07-22-2011
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Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

the point is when you look at the nook blog, free fridays, book suggestions do you see DIVERSITY!!!! IF NOT THEN THERE IS A REASON. Thats what he is saying ACKNOWLEDGE there are authors that are not WHITE!!! How come they don't suggest NO BLACK AUTHORS, INDIAN AUTHORS, ETC on there home page.... 

Distinguished Bibliophile
MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,231
Registered: ‎07-25-2011

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

Internet truth: people will not read a rant written in all-capital letters.

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Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,453
Registered: ‎06-07-2011

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look


MacMcK1957 wrote:

Internet truth: people will not read a rant written in all-capital letters.


To say nothing of ones riddled with poor grammar.

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
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patgolfneb
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
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Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

I  believe books by  Samuel Delaney, Maya Angelo,  James Baldwin  have been free Friday selections in the  past.  The real issue is that not all African American authors aim their books primarily at an African American audience...  FWIW if you search the BN shop for African American authors an extensive list follows. Publishers not BN decide which books to offer.  I suspect a reasoned response is wasted but given the contents of the op,  I felt just dismissing it because of the form just confirms the biases of the op. 

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keriflur
Posts: 6,773
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look


patgolfneb wrote:

I  believe books by  Samuel Delaney, Maya Angelo,  James Baldwin  have been free Friday selections in the  past.  The real issue is that not all African American authors aim their books primarily at an African American audience...  FWIW if you search the BN shop for African American authors an extensive list follows. Publishers not BN decide which books to offer.  I suspect a reasoned response is wasted but given the contents of the op,  I felt just dismissing it because of the form just confirms the biases of the op. 


There is an oft-discussed lack of diversity in publishing. The problem lies in the industry, and in the writers, and in who chooses to study writing, and in gender biases (in childhood and on up) that lead to white folks believing they can be writers and other folks not so much believing that.  And it lies in the readers and what they choose to buy.

 

I'm sure a small piece of that pie of blame belongs to booksellers and what they choose to stock and market, but it's a very small part.