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We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Contributor
ssgbutlerec
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-05-2010

Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

[ Edited ]

 Just petitioning B&N to add a Black Category to its main website and, at least, to the community pages.  I read a variety of genres and books, but it is so difficult to locate Black authors.  Feel free to post a comment on the subject readers, I know you are out there....And Admin please take note!

 

 Hope to hear from you guys in the Black Community (and yes I use Black, we are not all African American) post something and let's help some authors to the top.

 

  I'm also a new Nook user and I am open to suggestions for friends and the Nook community on new books. 

Just call me Mister
the former SSG
Correspondent
token787
Posts: 139
Registered: ‎04-10-2010

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

I do agree, can't find any authors of the african american heritage or there is little if any.  Maybe, this is why so many shop at Amazon all genre's of all types is there. I wish B&N would look into this more because the selection is sad. I won't even speak on the website but I know it is not user friendly at all.

Distinguished Wordsmith
FantasyRider
Posts: 250
Registered: ‎05-09-2010

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

I won't repeat my reply to the new board idea that I posted in the other community board.

 

However, I'm curious if you have read any of these B&N books (and have some review insight) that I have samples of in my reading wish list...Zahrah the Windseeker (anthology), From Cape Town with Love (fiction), Warrior Poet (biography), Lay My Burden Down (non-fiction/psychiatry), Youngblood (social protest chronicals)  and for a little Sci-Fi From the Notebooks of Dr. Brain
     

"You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother." Albert Einstein
Contributor
ssgbutlerec
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-05-2010

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

@token: 

 

 Yeah I'm realizing now that Amazon is definitely more multicultural.  I mean-- I can see the physical stores stocking by demographic, I guess Barnes and Noble is the cultured older store and Amazon is more in touch with now.  It's what's down the street from my house so I have to adapt, but as far as researching or getting hard to reach titles I definitely go to Amazon.  This is why Black bookstores have to be supported, it's just sad they are not everywhere.

Just call me Mister
the former SSG
Contributor
ssgbutlerec
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎10-05-2010

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

[ Edited ]

To :Fantasy Rider,

 

  First of all I have to say that I love your EInstein quote, and you also made some fine points in the post response on the other board.  I will stand fast though and state that Black Fiction is a Genre.

 

  Now on to some book loving.  Zahrah the Windseeker  is actually a young adult book.  It is a great read though (and you may be a teen).  The author Nnedi Okorafor (the name she uses now) is a fine writer though and has slowly moved from a writer of short stories and young adult tales and into more adult territory with:

 

Who Fears Death  by Nnedi Okorafor

 

 This is a must read book.  It's based in somewhere in Africa, in an apocalyptic future.  If you read the sample, I have to advise you that it starts slow (like the 1st Star Wars), but it gets better and when the story starts moving, it doesn't stop. The tale centers around a young heroine, who may is considered a magical savior by some, and a ravenous demon by others. The story follows her as has to make decisions that will affect not only her family, but will determine if she dies or lives. 

 

 I would have to describe this story as fantasy. The SciFi elements are there only in setting.  The novel does lag a bit, when it starts to focus on secondary characters, but it does flesh them out for us to fully identify with.  The real morsel to this tale is where it will lead you to in the end.  I must say it has one of the best finishes every. Simply epic.  CHeck this one out soon so you can be ready for her next book. 

 

 From Cape Town with Love, look I'm glad you mentioned this book.  I thought I was the only one on the fence considering purchasing it.  I hate to say it, but when it comes to some fiction you have to judge the book by it's cover.  Normally when it's to glitzy I expect less.  I have not read this book yet only because I found out that it is the 3rd book in a series.  I am going to start on the 1st book

Casanegra  and then

 

In the Night of the Heat  sometime next week and I'll have a review up on those. My main reason for going for this one is it's endorsed by Walter Mosley.

 

  I read part of Warrior Poet  a few years back, but never finished it.  At least I'm not the only person to read a sample of it.  I just really wasn't feeling the story and couldn't identify with the subject of the book.  Plus it just seemed to me that it was one of those bios that was written by someone that really didn't have a lot to work with.

 

 I haven't read the other titles, but I'll add them to my samples and see if there might be something that catches my eye.  Hope I was some help. 

Just call me Mister
the former SSG
B&N Bookseller
JL_Garner
Posts: 338
Registered: ‎04-09-2009

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

As a bookseller, I'd like there to at least be a searchable category of "Black fiction" or "urban fiction" or whatever it should be called. Not every store has the right demographics that would warrant a devoted section on the salesfloor -- especially at a time when we're giving over more of our floor space to Nook and educational toys & games -- but it would definitely be an aid to booksellers in trying to identify these books when customers come looking for them. Fortunately I've helped enough customers over the years that I'm familiar with the names of some of the more popular authors in this genre, but if it's an author I'm unfamilar with I can end up lost at sea.

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

 


JL_Garner wrote:

As a bookseller, I'd like there to at least be a searchable category of "Black fiction" or "urban fiction" or whatever it should be called. Not every store has the right demographics that would warrant a devoted section on the salesfloor -- especially at a time when we're giving over more of our floor space to Nook and educational toys & games -- but it would definitely be an aid to booksellers in trying to identify these books when customers come looking for them. Fortunately I've helped enough customers over the years that I'm familiar with the names of some of the more popular authors in this genre, but if it's an author I'm unfamilar with I can end up lost at sea.


 

Well urban fiction is another term for paranormal so...

 

The problem is with a lot of books unless it's a picture in the back or up on a web site, a good many publishers don't bother listing an author's race. Or sex for that matter. Though being able to filter better on searches would be an excellent improvement!

 

I have stumbled on a couple of AA publishing houses.

 

What people are asking for though is a racially centered weekly blog, or a board section.

 

My only issue is with racial exclusivity issues. Why only a African American board? Why not Asian, Hispanic, Native American, ect.....?

 

BTW though my local B&N has an ethnic section and the local Walmarts have a AA section. Doesn't yours cater to it's demographic?

 

 

 

B&N Bookseller
JL_Garner
Posts: 338
Registered: ‎04-09-2009

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Well urban fiction is another term for paranormal so...

 


 

I've never heard urban fiction used in connection with paranormal fiction.

 


TiggerBear wrote:

 

BTW though my local B&N has an ethnic section and the local Walmarts have a AA section. Doesn't yours cater to it's demographic?

I assume you're addressing that to me rather than the thread starter. My store's demographic is generally white; in the eight years I've been here, we've never had sufficient demand for African-American fiction titles to justify a seperate section. Similarly, our "Libros en Espanol" section is about 2-3 shelves at the end of Foreign Language. We do have a large section of African-American nonfiction in the Cultural Studies section, but that's always been there.

 

Doug_Pardee
Posts: 5,516
Kudos: 3,995
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look


JL_Garner wrote:

 

I've never heard urban fiction used in connection with paranormal fiction.


Right. The genre of urban fantasy often has paranormal elements, but that's separate from urban fiction.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: Barnes and Noble needs an African American (Black) Genre, Blog, or First Look

 


JL_Garner wrote:

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Well urban fiction is another term for paranormal so...

 


 

I've never heard urban fiction used in connection with paranormal fiction.


Yeah it's the old terminology ala 01, a few people and publishing houses still use it. Not a cutting edge reference but... to save confusion. (shrug)

 


TiggerBear wrote:

 

BTW though my local B&N has an ethnic section and the local Walmarts have a AA section. Doesn't yours cater to it's demographic?

I assume you're addressing that to me rather than the thread starter. My store's demographic is generally white; in the eight years I've been here, we've never had sufficient demand for African-American fiction titles to justify a seperate section. Similarly, our "Libros en Espanol" section is about 2-3 shelves at the end of Foreign Language. We do have a large section of African-American nonfiction in the Cultural Studies section, but that's always been there.


Yes the BTW was directed towards you, I was curious. Thanks for responding.