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Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Books for New Parents

Major milestones tend to be both very exciting and very confusing. And this is probably most true when a couple is expecting a child (especially their first one!).

One of the most creative gifts I’ve seen for new parents is a gift basket full of baby goodies and parenting books. One of the coolest ideas was a book about photographing your baby. How to Photograph Your Baby’s First Year looks like just the advice the shutter-happy, proud parents need!

And of course, there is no shortage of books about caring for a baby (What to Expect the First Year) or communicating with your toddler (The Happiest Toddler on the Block). There are even books meant to be read to the baby before it's born (Oh, Baby, the Places You'll Go!).

In the interest of full disclosure, I’m having my first baby soon. Whereas many expecting moms have the fever for tiny baby socks and onesies, I can’t stop buying books!

Personally, the parenting section in the book store can seem a little daunting, though... So tell me -- what books have you bought as gifts for the new parents you know? What would you include in a gift basket?

And for all you parents out there, what books do you rely on for guidance? Share your recommendations, and any hard-won lessons you’ve learned along the way!

Jessica
Book Club Editor
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rebelhousewife
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-08-2007
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Re: Books for New Parents

Jessica,
CONGRATULATIONS!!!

And Welcome to The Club! ;-)
I am the mother of 3 (ages 12, 9 & 6), and I'm still learning.

Recommendations:
1) Okay, MY book, of course (women's humor):
The Rebel Housewife Rules: To Heck With Domestic Bliss!
by Sherri Caldwell & Vicki Todd
(Conari Press, 2004)

2) New book I recently reviewed: "Required Reading..."
Babyproofing Your Marriage:
How to Laugh More, Argue Less,
and Communicate Better as Your Family Grows
By Stacie Cockrell, Cathy O’Neill, and Julia Stone
(Collins, January 2007)

3) Another new book (fiction) I loved, with a great message for New Moms who may be tempted to try and keep up with all those seemingly-perfect Mommies:
The Yummy Mummy
by Polly Williams
(Hyperion, 2007)

I'm new to B&N Book Groups and these conversations, so I don't know how to post links properly, but you'll be able to find them. I am an Author, Humor Columnist & Reviewer, and reviewed Babyproofing and The Yummy Mummy in Rebel Reviews on www.RebelHousewife.com. Stop by for a visit sometime!

Warm Regards,
Sherri
Sherri Caldwell
~ ~ Not just a housewife - The REBEL Housewife!! ~ ~
Humor Columnist & Reviewer at http://www.rebelhousewife.com
Co-Author: The Rebel Housewife Rules: To Heck With Domestic Bliss!
(Conari Press, Sept. 2004)
sherri@rebelhousewife.com
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Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Re: Books for New Parents

Hi Sherri,

Thanks for all the great book recommendations!

I've read Babyproofing Your Marriage (the authors participated in a BN.com book club last month) -- the book was fun and funny.

And is the Yummy Mummy book in any way associated with the show by the same name on the Discovery Channel?

Jessica
Book Club Editor
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Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Re: Books for New Parents



Jessica wrote: So tell me -- what books have you bought as gifts for the new parents you know? What would you include in a gift basket?




There's only one book for new parents
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780201050714&itm=2

For a bookseller that will not be a satifying information because you want to sell many books. However, recommending just that book satisfies my conscience.

ziki :smileyhappy:
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Posts: 3,107
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Re: Books for New Parents



Jessica wrote:In the interest of full disclosure, I’m having my first baby soon. Whereas many expecting moms have the fever for tiny baby socks and onesies, I can’t stop buying books!




Yeah, but soon you won't have any time left to read them :smileyvery-happy:

Good luck with everything!

ziki
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Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
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Re: Books for New Parents

Thanks Ziki!
(Yeah, I have big dreams of getting a lot of reading done on maternity leave. We'll see...):smileyhappy:
Frequent Contributor
Trillian
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎11-16-2006
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Re: Books for New Parents

Congrats, Jessica!

Here are a few that we found useful:

Super Baby Food -- this tells you how to shop for and make healthy food for your baby and toddler. I'll be honest, we used the stuff in the jar quite a lot but whenever I could I tried to fix fresh stuff, and this book was a big help!

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?EAN=9780965260312

Solve Your Child's Sleep Problems -- this is the book by Dr. Ferber of "Ferberizing" -- which most people think means "cry it out." But that's not really what Dr. Ferber means to advocate, and this book is informative and really well written about sleep issues in children of ALL ages.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780743201636

We also got some use out of Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?ean=9780449004029

The two perspectives in these books work pretty well together.

Oh, also for bedtime -- once you're tired of Goodnight Moon try Harold and the Purple Crayon!

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?EAN=9780064430227

Good luck with everything!




Jessica wrote:
Major milestones tend to be both very exciting and very confusing. And this is probably most true when a couple is expecting a child (especially their first one!).

One of the most creative gifts I’ve seen for new parents is a gift basket full of baby goodies and parenting books. One of the coolest ideas was a book about photographing your baby. How to Photograph Your Baby’s First Year looks like just the advice the shutter-happy, proud parents need!

And of course, there is no shortage of books about caring for a baby (What to Expect the First Year) or communicating with your toddler (The Happiest Toddler on the Block). There are even books meant to be read to the baby before it's born (Oh, Baby, the Places You'll Go!).

In the interest of full disclosure, I’m having my first baby soon. Whereas many expecting moms have the fever for tiny baby socks and onesies, I can’t stop buying books!

Personally, the parenting section in the book store can seem a little daunting, though... So tell me -- what books have you bought as gifts for the new parents you know? What would you include in a gift basket?

And for all you parents out there, what books do you rely on for guidance? Share your recommendations, and any hard-won lessons you’ve learned along the way!

Jessica
Book Club Editor


We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.-- Oscar Wilde
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KristyR
Posts: 379
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: Books for New Parents

Congratulations Jessica! I am due with my 5th June 18, mine are 10, 7, 5, 2, and soon! I read a lot of books at first, but now usually only use them for specific references. While I liked the What to Expect ... books I found them a little too rigid at times. They can make you positively paranoid! (my kids have never eaten that many different foods all on the same day!) One website I love is ModernMom.com, you can ask any question and receive lots of information and advice. I've read some great books on raising boys, raising girls, highly sensitive children, strong willed children, breast feeding, the family bed, etc. There are some great books out there depending on your parenting style.
By the way, I actually do get a lot of reading done when my kids were newborns. They would fall asleep and I would read. That meant ignoring the dishes, laundry, and even getting dressed some days, but oh well! Sitting in the recliner with a baby sound asleep on your chest and a great book, it doesn't get much better than that!
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 3,107
Registered: ‎10-27-2006
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Re: Books for New Parents

[ Edited ]

KristyR wrote:By the way, I actually do get a lot of reading done when my kids were newborns. They would fall asleep and I would read. That meant ignoring the dishes, laundry, and even getting dressed some days, but oh well! Sitting in the recliner with a baby sound asleep on your chest and a great book, it doesn't get much better than that!





Nice, once you adjust your preferences all is peace :smileyhappy:

What a kid needs is attention (not fussing) and presence along with respect and trust. That requires boundaries along with genuine interest.

You cater for this from the very start by bodily holding, eye contact and psychological holding. Trust your deeper instincts and build a connection with the baby. Both hold and let go with the right timing. Learn to differentiate between what the baby needs, and what you need.

Your needs should be fulfilled by other grown ups around you.

The baby's first task is "to get" (and incorporate) and spit out/sh-t (=eliminate). That is a very important task, bodily and psychologically. To be able to say yes to what is good and no to what is not and trust one's judgement while we also interact is something we learn for life and we start learning it from day one (if not earlier).
As a mother you can model respect and authority in appropriate proportions, depending on the age of the child.

We don't own our kids, they are individuals and you are just their guide/helper while they grow up. It helps to be aware of one own's issues and limitations not to transfer unnecessary patterns and fears but that is an ongoing work. Kids are honest and they will point out your weakest spots. Be grateful. Learn from them.

It helps to have some general idea about their development. They grow fastest ever during the first year. As a mom you are The Universe and you need to accomodate that feature in your psyche even if you at times feel less than that i.e. little and needy, not seen and ugly, used, sucked, insufficient etc. etc.

As a parent I guess you always exist on the edge and you always do your best (however that is measured) because if you could do better, you most likely would.

New phase in life, enjoy!

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 04-10-200703:17 AM

Frequent Contributor
jessicaabruno
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎11-15-2006
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Re: Books for New Parents

Jessica,

Congratz on your pregnancy. Well, I'm replying to this topic even though I haven't reach this stage yet. ITA with what the others said to you so far, especially what Ziki said to you.



ziki wrote:Nice, once you adjust your preferences all is peace :smileyhappy:

What a kid needs is attention (not fussing) and presence along with respect and trust. That requires boundaries along with genuine interest.

You cater for this from the very start by bodily holding, eye contact and psychological holding. Trust your deeper instincts and build a connection with the baby. Both hold and let go with the right timing. Learn to differentiate between what the baby needs, and what you need.

Your needs should be fulfilled by other grown ups around you.

The baby's first task is "to get" (and incorporate) and spit out/sh-t (=eliminate). That is a very important task, bodily and psychologically. To be able to say yes to what is good and no to what is not and trust one's judgement while we also interact is something we learn for life and we start learning it from day one (if not earlier).
As a mother you can model respect and authority in appropriate proportions, depending on the age of the child.

We don't own our kids, they are individuals and you are just their guide/helper while they grow up. It helps to be aware of one own's issues and limitations not to transfer unnecessary patterns and fears but that is an ongoing work. Kids are honest and they will point out your weakest spots. Be grateful. Learn from them.

It helps to have some general idea about their development. They grow fastest ever during the first year. As a mom you are The Universe and you need to accomodate that feature in your psyche even if you at times feel less than that i.e. little and needy, not seen and ugly, used, sucked, insufficient etc. etc.

As a parent I guess you always exist on the edge and you always do your best (however that is measured) because if you could do better, you most likely would.

New phase in life, enjoy!

ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 04-10-200703:17 AM






I recommend these books as well.

Birth, Tina Cassidy (http://www.tinacassidy.net)

Birth Crisis, Sheila Kitzinger (http://www.sheilakitzinger.com/index.html)

Our Bodies, Ourselves, The Boston Women's Health Book Collective (http://www.ourbodiesoursleves.org)

The Baby Business, Debora L. Spar, Phd,

The BabyCenter Essential Guide to Pregnancy and Birth, BabyCenter Editorial Staff and etc (http://www.babycenter.com)

Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering, Sarah J Buckley, MD/GP (http://www.sarahjbuckley.com)

The Diary of an Honest Mum, Jools Oliver

Maternal Desire, Daphne de Marneffe, Phd

It Could Happen to You, Martha Brockenbrough (http://www.marthabee.com)

Think that it for now.

Good luck with this and beyond.

Hope to hear from you as your pregnancy progresses.

Thank you.
Jessica A Bruno (waybeyondfedup)