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Sarah3973
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Re: Can't stand wildly popular author

 


DeanaCal wrote:

Whew!  Glad to know I'm not alone!  It's funny reading the responses on this thread and seeing what everybody else is saying. 

 

The specific author I was referencing in the OP is James Patterson.  I understand that all of his books are actually co-written with other people, so perhaps it's his co-writer who's bugging me so much. :smileyhappy:

 

I understand what people are saying about Dan Brown and the Harry Potter and Twilight series.  I read the first Harry Potter book and just wasn't interested to go any further.  I read all four of the Twilight books in a two-week rush because every other woman in my office had read them and I felt a little left out of all the coffee break discussions.  I didn't actually like the story until after I got a good ways into the third book, so that definitely took some patience!


I can't stand James Patterson these days.  I read something about how he doesn't even co-author most of his books anymore.  He comes up with a idea and creates an outline; then someone else pens the story.  (Wish I could find that link, I'll keep looking).  Call me crazy, but to me that seems like cheating.  I do have to admit that I did really enjoy the first few Alex Cross books.  But now, Patterson is all about quantity, not quality.  It's really too bad.

 

Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book. ~Author Unknown
Doug_Pardee
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Re: Can't stand wildly popular author


Sarah3973 wrote:

 

I can't stand James Patterson these days.  I read something about how he doesn't even co-author most of his books anymore.  He comes up with a idea and creates an outline; then someone else pens the story.  (Wish I could find that link, I'll keep looking).  Call me crazy, but to me that seems like cheating.


Many popular authors do that. Patterson, at least, is quite honest about it and his book covers credit the writers (Tom Clancy does the same). Patterson says that he considers himself a good story-teller but not a good writer, so he creates the story line and reviews the finished work, but leaves the writing to people he considers to be good at word-craft.

 

I've read books by people I wished would've done that. Story-telling and English composition are two very different skills. Story-telling is highly creative, while writing English is based on following rules.

 

Inspired Correspondent
reader_824
Posts: 485
Registered: ‎11-29-2010

Re: Can't stand wildly popular author

There are any number of popular authors I don't read or want to read. I chalk that up to personal taste, like the liking of food or fashion, etc.  I just avoid what I don't like and let those who do enjoy.

 

I've long thought a lot of the very popular and prolific writers...turning out books almost monthly...must have a legion of people who are writing and submitting work under the popular writer's name.  I just don't think most people can turn out that number of works on such varied topics in that short a period of time. In addition, it seems the style and writing quality vary too much within the works of some authors.

 

Maybe I'm just a cynic, but I think good writing is too hard to be able to crank out multiple titles in a short time frame.

Inspired Wordsmith
dvt88
Posts: 388
Registered: ‎01-04-2011

Re: Can't stand wildly popular author

nothing wrong with not liking a book. It did take me a while to be able to put a book down if I did'nt like it. Good for you.................................................There comes a time when you have to choose between turning the page and closing the book!

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Sarah3973
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Re: Can't stand wildly popular author

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:

Sarah3973 wrote:

 

I can't stand James Patterson these days.  I read something about how he doesn't even co-author most of his books anymore.  He comes up with a idea and creates an outline; then someone else pens the story.  (Wish I could find that link, I'll keep looking).  Call me crazy, but to me that seems like cheating.


Many popular authors do that. Patterson, at least, is quite honest about it and his book covers credit the writers (Tom Clancy does the same). Patterson says that he considers himself a good story-teller but not a good writer, so he creates the story line and reviews the finished work, but leaves the writing to people he considers to be good at word-craft.

 

I've read books by people I wished would've done that. Story-telling and English composition are two very different skills. Story-telling is highly creative, while writing English is based on following rules.

 


Thanks for the info Doug...but that just depresses me.  Writing is just so personal to me and that just seems so corporate for some reason.  Maybe it's just my naiveté, but I like to think that my favorite authors struggle over each and every word that's printed under their names; that sentence structure keeps them up at night and that their characters are shimmery shadows just outside the corners of their eyes waiting to be brought to life with every stroke of the pen or tap of the keyboard.  I have this very romanticized picture in my mind about authors and their inner turmoil.  :smileyhappy:

 

Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book. ~Author Unknown
Doug_Pardee
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Corporate authorship


Sarah3973 wrote:

 

that just seems so corporate for some reason.  Maybe it's just my naiveté, but I like to think that my favorite authors struggle over each and every word that's printed under their names


You're talking about the kind of author who doesn't make any money from her writing. :smileywink: You'll find them publishing through Smashwords and PubIt! these days.

 

Jane Austen wrote six novels in her entire life. Today, a six-novel series may be just enough to get you on the public's "radar". James Patterson has his name on over sixty. Janet Evanovich has written almost forty. Stephen King, almost fifty. Nora Roberts, over two hundred.

 

Publishing novels in mass quantity is how you get noticed and how you become able to afford being a full-time author. The big publishers (and agents) generally aren't interested in authors who don't show the promise of being able to turn out novels by the dozens, preferably in a series. They don't want to deal with a zillion authors who each sell a few thousand copies of one novel; they want a few prolific authors who can be relied upon to sell hundreds of thousands of copies.

 

When you're writing an entire novel every few months — or for Nora Roberts, every few weeks — it's business all the way. Nothing romantic about it.