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Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,644
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks


roustabout wrote:
Is there a prohibition on publishers selling their own titles to the public?  Being the only sources for new copies of those titles?  

 

I honestly don't know;  it seems possible to me, since I can order direct from so many university presses. 

 

If the publishers are afraid of Big Bad Amazon, that's the smart move. 


I assume there's no prohibition on this as some of th smaller pubs do this.

 

AFAIK there's also no prohibition on choosing who you do and do not do business with.  If the pubs wanted to cut Amazon out completely, they could.  I would assume that they could also choose to sell .epub through all .epub vendors and sell .amz or .mobi direct from the publisher only.

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks


flyingtoastr wrote:

deesy58 wrote:

Well, perhaps it is time to look at the History books. 

 

Once upon a time, there was a company called "Standard Oil" ...  Oh yes, and there was another called the "Bell System," which included AT&T, Western Electric, the various "Baby Bells" along with Bell Laboratories.  Where are they now?

 

IBM was forced to "unbundle" its pricing.  Microsoft signed a "consent decree" under antitrust laws.  Now, Apple is in the sights of the government.  Do you really believe that this is the end of publishing as we know it? 

 

This is just more "Chicken Little" overreaction.  It's a little early to be making such dire predictions, don't you think?



So you're saying we should just sit back, let Amazon drive everyone out of business, THEN bring them up for anti-trust.

 

Really?


Sounds like you're saying it -- not me. 

 

On the other hand, how do you prosecute anybody for breaking a law before they break it?  Sounds like Science Fiction to me.  :smileywink:

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,644
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks


deesy58 wrote:
On the other hand, how do you prosecute anybody for breaking a law before they break it?  Sounds like Science Fiction to me.  :smileywink:

No doubt the precogs have already seen this. :smileywink:

Distinguished Scribe
Ya_Ya
Posts: 3,334
Registered: ‎09-29-2010
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Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks

[ Edited ]

flyingtoastr wrote:


So you're saying we should just sit back, let Amazon drive everyone out of business


They can do this without breaking the law, (again), even.

 

All they have to do is sell most/everything at cost.  Nobody else (except Apple and Google) can afford that, either, and in that situation Amazon couldn't be breaking the law since it requires that the retailer be selling below cost.

 

Holder could keep an eye on this as long as he wants but ...

 

So maybe ebook prices won't go down to $9.99 again.  Maybe they'll all mostly be $12.49 or $12.99.

Distinguished Scribe
Ya_Ya
Posts: 3,334
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Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks


roustabout wrote:

 

Is there a prohibition on publishers selling their own titles to the public?  Being the only sources for new copies of those titles?  

 

I honestly don't know;  it seems possible to me, since I can order direct from so many university presses.   


Unless it came into play because of this deal, I wouldn't think so.

 

Under the agency model, we are were buying directly from the publishers - at least according to B&N.  Look at any Big Six ebook:  This is The Maze Runner (bold mine):

 

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375893773
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 10/6/2009
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 177
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Series: Maze Runner Series, #1
  • File size: 2 MB
  • Items ship to U.S, APO/FPO and U.S. Protectorate addresses.
Distinguished Bibliophile
roustabout
Posts: 3,619
Registered: ‎03-31-2011
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Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks

After I asked the question, I remembered why it is that the publishers have to play kinda nice with Amazon for now: in addition to the ebook market, Amazon dominates the DTB market as well.  

 

And amongst all the piteous wailing it does seem that folks are consistently saying that DTBs are a really important money maker for publishers still.   

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
Nallia
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Registered: ‎02-15-2010
Wordsmith
Fred011
Posts: 212
Registered: ‎02-18-2012

Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks


Nallia wrote:
The people on this forum aren't the only ones worried about Amazon.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/12/business/media/amazon-to-cut-e-book-prices-shaking-rivals.html?_r=...

The article you referenced included the following statement:

 

"Apple’s introduction of the iPad in early 2010 seemed to offer a way to combat Amazon."

 

That statement makes it seem as if Apple introduced the iPad to halt Amazon's march toward total dominance of the ebook market.  Please note the following taken from the link within that very statement:

 

"When Apple introduced the iPad tablet computer in 2010, it was doing what it likes to do best: creating a new category to dominate, as it had done with the iPod and iPhone. By the end of the year, the company had sold nearly 15 million iPads, generating about $9.5 billion in revenue."

 

Just two years later, the chief executive of Apple, Timothy D. Cook, has a prediction: the day will come when tablet devices like the Apple iPad outsell traditional personal computers."

 

"Worried about Amazon"?  I don't think Apple introduced iPad to "combat" Amazon's growth in the ebook marketplace.

 

"Create a new technology to dominate" and ",,, devices like the Apple iPad outsell[ing] traditional personal computers" seems more like that reason for the introduction of iPad, not "to offer a way to combat Amazon."

Nallia
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Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks


Fred011 wrote:

Nallia wrote:
The people on this forum aren't the only ones worried about Amazon.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/12/business/media/amazon-to-cut-e-book-prices-shaking-rivals.html?_r=...

The article you referenced included the following statement:

 

"Apple’s introduction of the iPad in early 2010 seemed to offer a way to combat Amazon."

 

That statement makes it seem as if Apple introduced the iPad to halt Amazon's march toward total dominance of the ebook market.  Please note the following taken from the link within that very statement:

 

"When Apple introduced the iPad tablet computer in 2010, it was doing what it likes to do best: creating a new category to dominate, as it had done with the iPod and iPhone. By the end of the year, the company had sold nearly 15 million iPads, generating about $9.5 billion in revenue."

 

Just two years later, the chief executive of Apple, Timothy D. Cook, has a prediction: the day will come when tablet devices like the Apple iPad outsell traditional personal computers."

 

"Worried about Amazon"?  I don't think Apple introduced iPad to "combat" Amazon's growth in the ebook marketplace.

 

"Create a new technology to dominate" and ",,, devices like the Apple iPad outsell[ing] traditional personal computers" seems more like that reason for the introduction of iPad, not "to offer a way to combat Amazon."


*shrugs* I don't disagree with you about the reasons Apple created the iPad, and don't really care. My only assertion is that the people on this forum are not the only ones concerned about about what might happen to ebooks and Amazon's hold on the market. Nothing more.
Distinguished Bibliophile
roustabout
Posts: 3,619
Registered: ‎03-31-2011

Re: Consumer Group: E-book Price Fixing Costs Big Bucks

Whose perspective is being referred to is important here:

 

""Apple’s introduction of the iPad in early 2010 seemed to offer a way to combat Amazon."

 

From the perspective of the publishers, that's completely true.  

 

Also, when Apple introduced the iPad - a lot of folks forget this now, since it lasted in the press and consumers' minds for about a week - it was being talked about as a Kindle killer:  a fullscreen touchscreen device that would be great to read on.

 

These are examples of the press coverage shortly after the iPad was introduced

 

http://techcrunch.com/2010/01/28/top-10-reasons-ipad-kindle/

 

http://www.techflash.com/seattle/2010/01/apple_tablet_unveiled.html 

 

Apple also touted the iPad as an e-reader during the launch announcement.   

 

Jobs himself said "Amazon did a great job with their reader and we’re standing on their shoulders here.” 

 

Then, after about a week, it was obvious that the iPad was

- an inconvenient ereader at best

- a great toy

 

Within a month or two, I think Apple knew that it was not getting much traction on selling books on iPads, but it didn't matter - they were selling apps and devices.  By last year, the publishers were making the iPad's failure as a reader pretty clear.   

 

But by then, Apple had rewritten the rules of ebook sales to its benefit with the assistance of the publishing houses.  

 

I think it's great that Apple was so public about the level to which they were working with the publishers, though I'm sure the publishers wish Apple had been more careful.   

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.