Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. On May 1, we’re saying goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Distinguished Scribe
gb18
Posts: 746
Registered: ‎12-06-2010

E-books are changing reading habits

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kamas716
Posts: 1,387
Registered: ‎09-28-2011

Re: E-books are changing reading habits

I've definitely been doing more reading since I got my NST.  I'm still not reading as much as I'd like, but it's a big increase none the less.

http://www.goodreads.com/kamas716
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eaglewomanEP
Posts: 195
Registered: ‎11-25-2011
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits

I have done a lot more reading since I got my Nook. Can take it everywhere and read in line or waiting.So far this year I have read over 150 books.

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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,103
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits

I used to have periods when I didn't get to the bookstore very often, and had nothing new to read. Now I always have at least a half-dozen books sitting unread. I see an ad or a mention of an author and instantly go online to buy a book, or pick one up because it's discounted (or free). I would say that since I got my first Nook I am easily reading twice as much new content as I used to.
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bobstro
Posts: 3,530
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits

[ Edited ]

Would somebody please explain graph 3 for me?

 

Average number of books read in past 12 months:

 

On e-reader

18-39 yo. 21%

40 or older 16%

 

On traditional book

18-39 yo. 13%

40 or older 11%

 

Does this mean these demographics read that percentage of the overall total of books read on each device, or something else? Can we assume "on traditional book" means reading a book?

 

On graph 4, exactly how does posting to Facebook relate to reading? Does it only count if I post about it?

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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,103
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits

[ Edited ]

How does posting to Facebook relate to anything at all?

 

Actually the graphs at the top of the article are wrong or misleading.  Scroll down to the bottom of the article where they're much clearer.  Those are actually number of books read in the last year, not percentages (which make no sense).  The Facebook question asks if people have posted or tweeted an opinion about a book.

 

 

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bobstro
Posts: 3,530
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits

I had a chance to read a bit deeper into the article. There are still a few questions I have, besides the poorly done graphics:

 

What does this mean? "... And while Delk still buys physical books — "when you really want a copy of something solid and stable'' — most of his reading is done on his Kindle or iPad.

He's in the minority, but it's a growing minority."  Is he the minorit for bying physical books, or doing most of his reading on a device? Delk is 47. Is he a minority in his age demographics?

 

I do think this paragraph sums up the phenomenon nicely: "... That e-reader owners say they're reading more books doesn't surprise Michael Norris, a publishing analyst for Simba Information, a market research firm. He compares that to saying "a person who owns a bicycle is more likely to take bike rides. If you have a device, you have access to books that you just didn't have before, and a lot of them are free."" If "a lot of them are free", does that mean that the real change is in the amount of unpublish(ed/able) stuff readers using devices are willing to choke down? Sure, I'm reading twice as many books, but most are the modern-day equivalent of dime store pulps. I'm not necessarily buying twice as many books.

 

I do think the bicycle comment is apt. I've always felt that B&N should treat NOOK app users just ais they do NOOK device owners, and that B&N should do a lot more to court both and entice them into their stores and online. What does B&N care what sort of bike I own, so long as I ride it into their stores?

 

I'm definitely reading more since making the full jump over to ebooks, though my selection of device has less to do with it than simply being able to read on a portable device. I started reading more ebooks on my NOOK Color, but have kept the momentum up on 2 successive Samsung tablets. I've easily doubled my consumption (and purchase) of non-fiction, as well as fiction. I do find that reading on a device allows me to do more "channel surfing" than I would with a physical book. In the past, I'd carry one book around and more-or-less plow through it cover-to-cover before starting to lug the next one around. Rarely would I carrly two hefty tomes on a flight. Now, I flit around between fiction and non-fiction, and jump genres as soon as I get bored with one. I typically try to limit myself to 6 concurrent reads just so I don't forget what I've started.

 

This poll does seem to back the "guilty pleasure" aspect of ebook reading that I read about in a survey a couple of years ago. Not only are readers reading more books, but they're reading "shameful" titles that they might not read in public otherwise. Quoting the article: "... According to the poll, 35% of those with reading devices say they're reading more books since they got their reading devices. Nearly one in four — 23% — mentioned science fiction or fantasy, followed by mystery and crime (16%), romance (14%) and non-fiction (14%)." Not sure where 50 shades fits, but the winners seem to be "non-serious" titles. Not sure if this is because those are free, cheaper or simply easier to buy. There is the bonus that people at work won't see the gaudy cover of whatever it is you are reading.

 

One answer I don't think the article and survey provide is whether, now that they're reading more books, device owners are buying more books, and whether they're buying fewer paper books.

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MacMcK1957
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Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits

"... According to the poll, 35% of those with reading devices say they're reading more books since they got their reading devices. Nearly one in four — 23% — mentioned science fiction or fantasy, followed by mystery and crime (16%), romance (14%) and non-fiction (14%)."

 

Where does the famous Julie fit into that mix?

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bobstro
Posts: 3,530
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits

Never mind the attention-grabbing Julie. What option do I pick if I've been reading the Naughty Nurses collection exclusively?

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keriflur
Posts: 6,211
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: E-books are changing reading habits


MacMcK1957 wrote:

"... According to the poll, 35% of those with reading devices say they're reading more books since they got their reading devices. Nearly one in four — 23% — mentioned science fiction or fantasy, followed by mystery and crime (16%), romance (14%) and non-fiction (14%)."

 

Where does the famous Julie fit into that mix?


Julie reads mostly romance, specifically paranormal romance (i.e. fantasy).