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Distinguished Bibliophile
patgolfneb
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
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European Google / Android complaint

http://www.slashgear.com/fairsearch-europe-files-complaint-with-antitrust-regulators-against-ygoogle... Duh, this is what every computer company does with a dominant product. Europe is different, but unless Google blocks non Google products from the home screen or blocks consumer removal this can't go far can it.?
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bobstro
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Re: European Google / Android complaint

I think it's the implication that Google is pressuing manufacturers to put their apps on homescreens that's getting the attention. Microsoft got in trouble by loading up MSIE on the homescreen, so I can see similarities.

 

Personally, I'm glad the euros are looking at this sort of thing. I remember AT&T and IBM being broken up. Looking at Amazon, I have to wonder if that might have been a good idea.

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deesy58
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Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: European Google / Android complaint


bobstro wrote:

I think it's the implication that Google is pressuing manufacturers to put their apps on homescreens that's getting the attention. Microsoft got in trouble by loading up MSIE on the homescreen, so I can see similarities.

 

Personally, I'm glad the euros are looking at this sort of thing. I remember AT&T and IBM being broken up. Looking at Amazon, I have to wonder if that might have been a good idea.


I do not believe that IBM was ever "broken up."  Can you cite a supporting source for this assertion? 

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bobstro
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Re: European Google / Android complaint

[ Edited ]

deesy58 wrote:

I do not believe that IBM was ever "broken up."  Can you cite a supporting source for this assertion? 

 

A poor statement on my part. They were investigated and taken to court for years by DOJ. While never formally broken up as the Bells were, I recall the pressure was behind their unbundling of software and services. The EU has pressured them as well.

 

I was probably equally incorrect in saying "AT&T" was broken up, now that I think about it. They were Bell Telephone at the time, weren't they? I'm getting old.

 

Sustitute "investigated for monopolistic practices" for "broken up".

Distinguished Bibliophile
MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,308
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: European Google / Android complaint

AT&T was actually broken up, separated into several (five?) regional phone carriers, a separate national long-distance carrier (which kept the AT&T name), and Bell Labs, that became Lucent.

 

IBM was just forced to open up their standards and contracts, to allow others to make and market compatible hardware and peripherals.

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deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: European Google / Android complaint


MacMcK1957 wrote:

AT&T was actually broken up, separated into several (five?) regional phone carriers, a separate national long-distance carrier (which kept the AT&T name), and Bell Labs, that became Lucent.

 

IBM was just forced to open up their standards and contracts, to allow others to make and market compatible hardware and peripherals.


Don't forget Western Electric.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Electric

 

 

flyingtoastr
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Re: European Google / Android complaint

[ Edited ]

This is a really interesting case. There is precedent that running preinstalled applications as defaults out-of-the-box is heavily illegal in Europe. M$ even got brought up on this and had to pay fines as recently as last year for "browser choice" in Windows. I don't think Google will be able to get out of that part of the case and end up having to slightly fork Euro Android to provide "default choices" during setup the way M$ did for Windows (and pay some fines).

 

However, the people making this case are not only attacking preinstalled defaults, but the entire idea that Android is distributed free of charge. They're effectively saying that by giving away Android for free ("selling it below production cost" as the complaint says) Google is making it impossible to compete against them. That is worrying - a ruling against Google would therefore kill open source software, which a huge amount of our current technology is based on. While things like HTML would be safe, what about distributions of Linux that are distributed for free by profit seeking companies (Red Hat for instance) or things like MySQL that are developed by a profit-oriented company but released freely. It's a dangerous thing.

 

So it will be interesting to see where this goes.

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5ivedom
Posts: 3,544
Registered: ‎12-03-2011
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Re: European Google / Android complaint

FlyingToastr, I think they are attacking the wrong thing.

 

They should not be attacking the software being free.

Or Google profiting from it.

 

They should be attacking the illegal and unethical things Google does around it i.e.

 

1) Blackmail companies into not using other OSes. They did this with Acer or Asus where they made them drop the Aliyun OS.

 

2) Using the power of the default to make their own services the default and hiding other providers.

 

3) Data harvesting, most of which is illegal in Europe.

 

etc. etc.