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bklvr896
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Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing

I wonder how this might relate to the issue of eBook licensing and resale.  Google's license for the Google Glasses prohibits resale or lending of the device.

 

"Welcome to the New World, one in which companies are retaining control of their products even after consumers purchase them"

 

http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/18/tech/innovation/google-glass-resales/index.html?hpt=hp_t5

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5ivedom
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing

bklvr, I think they are only doing this right now because the 3,000 or so 'Explorer Edition' Google Glasses they are sending out are dangerous i.e.

 

If they get into the hands of competitors (supposed to include Microsoft, Samsung, etc.) then they could reverse-engineer a LOT of userful data out of it.

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patgolfneb
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing

I debated this very possibility with compulsiveread in another thread. My position was that current laws allowed this kind of control. I was not arguing it was desirable, far from it.  

 

The crux is that separating OS and software from a device  is not allowed by law. Installing an alternative, just like you would an alternative browser for example. Yes you can modify the hardware, different battery, memory chips, speakers, if possible with devices without legal risk. The fact that public pressure has kept firms from routinely doing it so far does notmean the law doesn't allow it.

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bklvr896
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing


5ivedom wrote:

bklvr, I think they are only doing this right now because the 3,000 or so 'Explorer Edition' Google Glasses they are sending out are dangerous i.e.

 

If they get into the hands of competitors (supposed to include Microsoft, Samsung, etc.) then they could reverse-engineer a LOT of userful data out of it.


Yes, that's true, but I think what is more interesting is that the law allows them to do it.  Regardless of the reason, if the law currently allows companies to control what we do with something that we "purchase", then we're not really purchasing it, we're leasing or licensing it.    So, is the outlook good that we will ever be able to sell or donate eBooks?  If the law stays as it is, then I would believe the answer will be no.  If the company can enforce the no resale, loaning, donation etc of something, which obviously they can with ebooks and apparently with physical devices such as the Google Glasses, then they're going to do it.

 

While there might be backlash now, in the form of goodwill of customers, if it doesn't change, then in a couple of years or more, it will be norm and many, especially younger folks, will think nothing of the fact that they don't actually "own" something, because it will be what they've always known.  They won't remember the days when you could donate a book or sell a device, because they won't have experienced it.

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keriflur
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing

So vote with your wallet.  If you have to agree to terms, then you aren't buying, you're leasing.  If you don't want to lease, or don't like the terms of the lease, don't.

 

If consumers refuse to buy items that require them to lease software with restrictive terms, then we won't see items with restrictive leases.  If people buy, then companies will continue to restrict.

 

IMO Google Glass is ridiculous.  I've no desire for it, and I hope it fails, not out of any maliciousness toward Google, but simply because of the ease of photographing someone on the street and then looking up data on them without any easy way for the person being photo'd to know what's going on.  Yes, you can do the same with a cell phone, but if you point your phone at me, I'll notice.  With the glasses, not so much.

 

With products like this out there, my concern goes to privacy rights, not licensing.

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patgolfneb
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing

Obviously the technology to do some of this more awkwardly has exitisted for some time. A number of shows with sci fi elements, CSi, Person of Interest, incorporate surveilance, data base, observation technology, not quite here yet. It is not yet clear how much right to privacy average people have in public. Certainly for public figures basically zero. We tend to worry about goverment mis use of technology. I am equally worried about robbers, stalkers, companies using someone with these researching who visits particular establishments when etc. Balancing freedom of information and privacy rights is increasingly difficult.
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bklvr896
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing


keriflur wrote:

So vote with your wallet.  If you have to agree to terms, then you aren't buying, you're leasing.  If you don't want to lease, or don't like the terms of the lease, don't.

 

If consumers refuse to buy items that require them to lease software with restrictive terms, then we won't see items with restrictive leases.  If people buy, then companies will continue to restrict.

 


Google Glass and privacy aside, my point is that as more companies try the licensing route, (1) if you need something you may not have an option and (2) people are going to get used to it and it's going to become the norm.  Somewhat like gasoline prices.  We get excited when gas is is $3.50-$3.75 (at least in CA), but it wasn't that long ago that $3/gallon gas was considered outrageous.  To some younger folk, gasoline priced under $2/gallon is something they've never experienced so the higher cost is normal to them.  As something before more common, the more we get used to it, it becomes the new "normal". 

Obviously Google can control the Google Glass because of the account association, eBooks can be controlled because of DRM, if the companies can find a way to restrict 2nd sales of their items, they're probably going to do it.

 

Which doesn't bode well for selling/donating eBooks unless the publishers suddenly become benevolent.

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keriflur
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing

[ Edited ]

patgolfneb wrote:
It is not yet clear how much right to privacy average people have in public. Certainly for public figures basically zero. We tend to worry about goverment mis use of technology. I am equally worried about robbers, stalkers, companies using someone with these researching who visits particular establishments when etc. Balancing freedom of information and privacy rights is increasingly difficult.

For photography, the current US law is pretty straightforward.  If I am standing in a public place, and I can see something, I can photograph it.  That's it.  The only exception is in the case of national security (you can have a fight on your hands if you attempt to photograph a nuclear plant, but even then the law favors the photographer).  As a photog myself I've always had mixed feelings on this, and while it's nice to not constantly have to ask permission, I do think some photogs way overstep their bounds (there's one guy whose name I forget who's famous for stuffing his camera in strangers' faces on the street and catching their surprised/angry/scared expressions on film).

 

The thing about this law is that it was written before the popularity of cell phone cameras, back when cameras were big and obvious.  But now, with google glass, where the person doesn't even need to point anything at you other then his head, the freedom of the law makes me feel a bit violated.

 

A few months ago there was drama on the evening news because the city of Seattle put a bunch of cameras on the waterfront facing the wrong direction.  The cameras were supposed to face toward the water, but were mounted to face the street by mistake.  Citizens were up in arms on their privacy being violated, because the cameras could potentially gather images of them in their homes and businesses.  Seeing the story and the interviews made me realize just how few people realize what the law states - that if they can be seen from the street, they can be legally photographed by not only the government but private citizens with any host of motivations, and the people behind the cameras don't need any permission at all.

flyingtoastr
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing


keriflur wrote:

 I've no desire for it, and I hope it fails, not out of any maliciousness toward Google, but simply because of the ease of photographing someone on the street and then looking up data on them without any easy way for the person being photo'd to know what's going on. 


Aside from the giant red light that covers nearly the entire front of the device when it's recording (as required by EU law).

 

Anyway, these terms are only for the pre-production developer kits, which is fairly standard practice for tech companies (you see it with developer kits for video game consoles as well). The people who are getting these devices are getting it for the express purpose of preparing their applications, that term in the EULA is to prevent them from jest selling the thing on eBay as a novelty. The actual devices that customers get won't be constrained so.

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5ivedom
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Re: Google Glass Licensing vs eBook Licensing

THis:

 

more interesting is that the law allows them to do it.  Regardless of the reason, if the law currently allows companies to control what we do with something that we "purchase", then we're not really purchasing it, we're leasing or licensing it. 

 

*****

 

is very true.

 

I think companies, intentionally or inadvertently, are creating this concept/belief that it's better to lease/license than own.

 

I think ebook terms are bad.

 

However, this Google Glass thing is very bad. If it's experimental devices only, then it's fine. However, I would not be surprised if Google and Apple and Microsoft started pushing for this in devices in future.