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Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
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Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

I'm a traditionalist who likes the feel of an actual book in my hands when I'm reading. (At least that's how I feel about the subject to date.) The freebies offered to B&N nook customers are understandable but irritating. Isn't it enough that some authors only offer their books and/or extras as e-books? Isn't it enough that some publishing companies have gone totally digital? It's not that I want to take away the freebies from the nookies, it's just that there should be some comparable perks for the regular book customers too. I know that it's my choice to read regular books, but lately I feel like a second class citizen to B&N. 

Doug_Pardee
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Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

  1. You can get discounts on printed books.
  2. You can use coupons on printed books.
  3. You can use your B&N Membership to get a further discount on printed books.
  4. You can buy used books.
  5. You can buy clearance books.
  6. You can buy remaindered books.
  7. You can give your books to someone else.
  8. You can sell your books to someone else.
  9. You can borrow books from a friend, or loan yours to a friend.

None of the above apply to most e-books. Items 3-8 don't apply to any e-book.

 

The people buying e-books are the ones who are feeling second-class, due to the absence of discounts and the inability to let anyone else read their e-books.

 

Inspired Correspondent
adm912
Posts: 113
Registered: ‎12-03-2010

Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

In addition to everything Doug said, you do have the option of getting the free books and using the Nook apps.  There's even one for PC or Mac.  So you aren't being left out on that front either.

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

[ Edited ]

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:
  1. You can get discounts on printed books.
  2. You can use coupons on printed books.
  3. You can use your B&N Membership to get a further discount on printed books.
  4. You can buy used books.
  5. You can buy clearance books.
  6. You can buy remaindered books.
  7. You can give your books to someone else.
  8. You can sell your books to someone else.
  9. You can borrow books from a friend, or loan yours to a friend.

None of the above apply to most e-books. Items 3-8 don't apply to any e-book.

 

The people buying e-books are the ones who are feeling second-class, due to the absence of discounts and the inability to let anyone else read their e-books.

 


 

It's funny. I use to get discount coupons all the time that were sent to me via e-mail. That doesn't occur anymore. Hasn't for quite some time. Plus, I haven't noticed any discounts when I look at a B&N link via a search engine. Maybe you can tell me where I can find these elusive discounts and/or coupons because I haven't seen them and can't find them. 

 

And yes, I can loan, give away or sell my books. Further, I can borrow a book from a friend. The point is that once I buy a book, I own it completely. That's one of the reasons I choose to stick with books. And, any e-book/nook reader can do the same if they choose to buy books instead of downloads. The fact is that books are available to everyone w/out investing in a nook or being conversant with computer downloads. 

 

Note, I rely on my B&N Membership to give me a percentage reduction on the books I buy from B&N. That's why I pay for it every year. Sorry, but I don't see how my membership is relevant to this discussion. If you're saying that the B&N Membership does not reduce the cost the e-book downloads, that's a regrettable situation that should be remedied.

 

Just based on the free weekly downloads, a person would have to be blind not to see the favoritism B&N gives its e-book readers. And, I wouldn't want to take that away, it's just that as a B&N member who chooses to stick with real books, I'd like to see some kind of comparable perk. (Note, for me the fee downloads to a computer are just not something I would do. I don't want to have to read a book on my computer and wouldn't know how to transfer such a download. Further, as I said before, I like having a real book in my hand when I'm reading.)

Inspired Wordsmith
Colleen_Rose
Posts: 313
Registered: ‎10-17-2010

Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

Actually, it is the publishers who decide a whether a book is free, not B&N.  B&N does spotlight a free book on Fridays. In fact last month, most of the books on free Fridays were books that had been free for while, B&N just brought them to more people's attention.

 

I am sorry you are not getting e-mailed coupons. I am and I am not even a B&N rewards member. Perhaps they have some sort of new e-mail list I might have gotten added to. I have also seen offers on the main website occassionally.

 

I am curious as to what you would suggest B&N do to make things equitable?

Colleen

Optimist: Someone who isn't sure whether life is a tragedy or a comedy but is tickled silly just to be in the play. ~Robert Brault
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
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Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

 


Colleen_Rose wrote:

Actually, it is the publishers who decide a whether a book is free, not B&N.  B&N does spotlight a free book on Fridays. In fact last month, most of the books on free Fridays were books that had been free for while, B&N just brought them to more people's attention.

 

I am sorry you are not getting e-mailed coupons. I am and I am not even a B&N rewards member. Perhaps they have some sort of new e-mail list I might have gotten added to. I have also seen offers on the main website occassionally.

 

I am curious as to what you would suggest B&N do to make things equitable?


 

Well, I have noticed that cost of paperbacks has increased. so perhaps B&N could lower that price to the previous $6 range. Of course that wouldn't help hardback readers. (I also happen to be a hardback reader.) Perhaps B&N could just start sending out book discount coupons again. I can't remember receiving one for months, and I always saved and used them to buy books that I hadn't pre-ordered but was interested in.

 

Right now I don't have any other suggestions, but I'm not in marketing and have no special business knowledge. I'm sure B&N could come up with something. 

Doug_Pardee
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Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality


dalnewt wrote:

 

I haven't noticed any discounts when I look at a B&N link via a search engine.


An example:

 

Live Wire (Myron Bolitar Series #10) in hardcover:

List price:$27.95

Discount B&N price: $15.19

 

 

Live Wire (Myron Bolitar Series #10) in NOOKbook:

List price: $14.99

B&N price: $14.99 - no discounts allowed by publisher

 

The hardcover is 20 cents more than the e-book, because the hardcover is discounted and the e-book isn't.

 


dalnewt wrote:

 

If you're saying that the B&N Membership does not reduce the cost the e-book downloads, that's a regrettable situation that should be remedied.


The B&N Membership is not valid on NOOK, NOOK accessories, NOOKbooks, NOOK magazines, or anything related to NOOK. No discounts, no credits, no nothing. Most NOOK owners who had memberships drop their memberships.

 

As for the e-books themselves, the 'Big 6' American trade publishers forbid any kind of discounting. E-books from those publishers must be sold at full list price by all booksellers, including B&N.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

[ Edited ]

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:

dalnewt wrote:

 

I haven't noticed any discounts when I look at a B&N link via a search engine.


An example:

 

Live Wire (Myron Bolitar Series #10) in hardcover:

List price:$27.95

Discount B&N price: $15.19

 

 

Live Wire (Myron Bolitar Series #10) in NOOKbook:

List price: $14.99

B&N price: $14.99 - no discounts allowed by publisher

 

The hardcover is 20 cents more than the e-book, because the hardcover is discounted and the e-book isn't.

 


dalnewt wrote:

 

If you're saying that the B&N Membership does not reduce the cost the e-book downloads, that's a regrettable situation that should be remedied.


The B&N Membership is not valid on NOOK, NOOK accessories, NOOKbooks, NOOK magazines, or anything related to NOOK. No discounts, no credits, no nothing. Most NOOK owners who had memberships drop their memberships.

 

As for the e-books themselves, the 'Big 6' American trade publishers forbid any kind of discounting. E-books from those publishers must be sold at full list price by all booksellers, including B&N.

 


 

I didn't know that a B&N memberships benefits were inapplicable to nook books. If I was a nook owner and only bought books via that method, I'd drop the membership too. But, the fact that the B&N member benefits only apply to real books is irrelevant to a discussion about the obvious partiality shown to nook owners. The B&N membership program pre-dates nooks. The fact that it continues to offer the benefits it always has offered is simply a recognition that B&N has chosen, for the time being, not to disenfranchise/alienate its members. Plus, every member pays for those benefits through their yearly fee.

 

As regards discounts offered by publishers on books, those 'discounts' are irrelevant to the perks B&N offers to its members/customers. Publishers set their own prices for books and e-books, and B&N has nothing to do with it.

 

P.S. Note, I have seen discussions on the boards referencing the contact between B&N representatives and publishers as regards selecting certain e-book books for free giveaways. So, although the publishers set their own prices, I have seen evidence of influence by B&N in terms of e-books. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

 


Colleen_Rose wrote:

Actually, it is the publishers who decide a whether a book is free, not B&N.  B&N does spotlight a free book on Fridays. In fact last month, most of the books on free Fridays were books that had been free for while, B&N just brought them to more people's attention.

 

I am sorry you are not getting e-mailed coupons. I am and I am not even a B&N rewards member. Perhaps they have some sort of new e-mail list I might have gotten added to. I have also seen offers on the main website occassionally.

 

I am curious as to what you would suggest B&N do to make things equitable?


 

Colleen

 

I'm really curious why you are receiving e-mailed coupons. (As I said before, I haven't received any for months and I'm a B&N member.) Are the coupons you're receiving for e-books only? Are there any specific restrictions on the coupons you're receiving? Do you have any idea why you would be on a special e-mail list to receive coupons while longtime B&N members go without?     

Inspired Wordsmith
Colleen_Rose
Posts: 313
Registered: ‎10-17-2010
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Re: Hard Not To Resent B&N's Nook Partiality

They don't have coupons for nookbooks. I will keep an eye on my e-mail to see what I get.  Honestly, I just delete them since I don' buy dtbs right now. 

Colleen

Optimist: Someone who isn't sure whether life is a tragedy or a comedy but is tickled silly just to be in the play. ~Robert Brault