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Wordsmith
TnTexas
Posts: 883
Registered: ‎10-22-2011

Re: How B&N encourages customers to become price-checking sideloaders

I'd say I'm a die-hard capitalist too. I just don't have a problem with smaller businesses standing side-by-side to keep from being run out of business by someone who would apparently like to be the only game in town - and are willing to do whatever it takes to knock everyone else off the playing field.

 

I suspect bklvr896 is correct though. Now that the mechanism has been put into place, I would imagine the most that will happen is a fine and things will continue on as they have been. Surely the DOJ can't make publishing companies sell their books to Amazon if they don't want to.

flyingtoastr
Posts: 3,011
Topics: 55
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Registered: ‎11-11-2009
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Re: How B&N encourages customers to become price-checking sideloaders

Amazon is an anathema to "real" capitalism anyway. 

 

Monopolies are bad.

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,551
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: How B&N encourages customers to become price-checking sideloaders


bklvr896 wrote:
If Amazon goes back to loss leading the eBooks, especially the best sellers, there isn't another retailer that can compete in the long term.

Hello, Amazon, meet Google.

Doug_Pardee
Posts: 5,516
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010
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Google e-books


keriflur wrote:

 

Hello, Amazon, meet Google.


The thing is, Google's been selling e-books for over a year (they started in December 2010), and have managed to sell very few e-books. Their market share is so small that they're usually not even mentioned in news stories about the e-book industry, and the e-book search engines InkMesh and AddAll don't bother to search them. Google "back-burnered" their e-book store last July, taking their development staff off of it, and now has removed the word "ebooks" from it entirely: it's part of "Google Play" along with music, movies, and Android apps.

 

It would appear that wireless downloading is a "must have" for a successful e-book store. Even Pottermore worked arrangements for wireless delivery to Kindles and NOOKs. Dealing with Adobe Digital Editions just isn't palatable for the masses.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,551
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Google e-books


Doug_Pardee wrote:

keriflur wrote:

 

Hello, Amazon, meet Google.


The thing is, Google's been selling e-books for over a year (they started in December 2010), and have managed to sell very few e-books. Their market share is so small that they're usually not even mentioned in news stories about the e-book industry, and the e-book search engines InkMesh and AddAll don't bother to search them. Google "back-burnered" their e-book store last July, taking their development staff off of it, and now has removed the word "ebooks" from it entirely: it's part of "Google Play" along with music, movies, and Android apps.

 

It would appear that wireless downloading is a "must have" for a successful e-book store. Even Pottermore worked arrangements for wireless delivery to Kindles and NOOKs. Dealing with Adobe Digital Editions just isn't palatable for the masses.

 


Android has 50% of the smartphone market and their tablet share is growing, and every single one of those devices has google books installed, so I don't see how they don't have wireless downloading.  I've had no trouble wirelessly downloading their books to my computer, my phone, etc.

 

IMO the move to put the books into Google Play was a good one.  I didn't realize that they were selling ebooks before they did that - I thought they were just digitizing commons books.  The store is easy, especially for anyone with an Android phone, as it links in with your Google account.

 

I believe that if Google wanted to push the ebooks, they could, and they could be very successful at it.  But right now, what's the incentive for them?  Market share is determined on device and reputation only, not price.  But if there was a price war, Google could clean house.

Wordsmith
doncr
Posts: 493
Registered: ‎12-29-2010
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Re: Google e-books


keriflur wrote:

I believe that if Google wanted to push the ebooks, they could, and they could be very successful at it.  But right now, what's the incentive for them? 


You'd be surprised what sort of infomation would be worthwhile to a marketing firm.  Knowing which books, newpapers, magazines you choose to read (and pay to do so) is more valuable than most people realize.