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5ivedom
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Re: So is this supposed to turn me off to self-publishing?

OK strange. I thought you wrote that you had shelve the research you did for one of your books.

 

Must have mis-read something.

 

 

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bobstro
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Re: So is this supposed to turn me off to self-publishing?

Not so fast. I'm pretty sure Keri shelves her books.
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keriflur
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Re: So is this supposed to turn me off to self-publishing?

[ Edited ]

In the context 5ivedom was talking about (putting a manuscript in a drawer to languish), I don't.  I let things rest so that I can get perspective on them while I work on other things, but I don't have anything sitting around that I'm never going to do anything with.

 

I don't really believe in wasting work, so I don't see myself ever having more than cuttings that I do nothing with.  Ideas that fail can be reused if the new context allows them to succeed.

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bobstro
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Re: So is this supposed to turn me off to self-publishing?

[ Edited ]

Itwasajoke

 

You can always make sausage, right?

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bobstro
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So I finished Blackbirds and have started on Wool...

Reaching back a bit, keriflur wrote:

I'm curious to hear how you like Wool.  I read the sample (the first two pages only), but it didn't draw me in enough to spend the ninety-nine cents.  I am exceedingly picky, though, and there have been a lot of books that, once I stuck it out, I came to enjoy.

 

 

I finished Blackbirds, which I enjoyed, but wasn't compelled by. I'm about 100 pages into the Wool omnibus. So far, I'm enjoying it, and do pick up my tablet just to read it. I like "lost past" post-apocalyptic stories in general, and this one's well written. I haven't gotten to any huge reveals yet, but it's smoothly written, with no jarring inconsistencies or lingering question marks. The one "big surprise" so far actually surprised me as I read the last line of the chapter. There are plenty of hints, but the writing was good enough that I didn't pick up on it. Blackbirds zoomed in on a handful of characters without really explaining how they got to be what they are. This one is painting a whole society and giving enough passing references to figure out how things got to be. I think I like the "it's not all about me" aspect.

 

(Yes, this belongs elsewhere, but I wanted to reply in-thread.)

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patgolfneb
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Re: So is this supposed to turn me off to self-publishing?

[ Edited ]

Link to article about David Mamet and established authors going self pub. Kind of a hybrid, agents handling promotion. 

 

Hard to say whether this is a disgruntled old lion, unhappy that he is no longer an A lister for his publisher or publishers are dropping the ball.

 

Article is balanced, + - of choices included. Models are evolving, hopefully the new options result in more high quality books and more income for authors, while retaining affordability for readers.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/17/business/media/david-mamet-and-other-big-authors-choose-to-self-pu...

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5ivedom
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Re: So is this supposed to turn me off to self-publishing?

Thanks for the link PatGolfNeb.

 

For established authors it's a very interesting situation.

 

If your brand is built up and if you no longer want to give 75% to Publishers for doing promotion and polishing, then going solo makes sense.

 

One thing I can tell you is that some of the self-published authors who are doing super well (100K+ sales a month) are ones who have a brand and then decided to do self-publishing.

 

They get a dual benefit

 

1) They already have the brand and the 'social proof'/'curation proof' of being published.

2) They can price lower ($3 to $5) and become much more compelling than similarly established authors whose books are at $10 and whose backlist is at $7 to $12.

 

*****

Basically, in books, most of the brand is with the Author.

 

So Publishers are in trouble if an author decides to go solo.

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keriflur
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Hugh Howey's gotten himself into trouble

http://www.salon.com/2013/04/15/self_publishing_star_faces_backlash_for_misogynist_rant_partner/

 

I read this when he originally posted it to his blog.  I found it offensive, but not as much as a lot of other folks did, apparently.

 

I wonder if this will help or hurt sales of his books.

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keriflur
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Re: So I finished Blackbirds and have started on Wool...


bobstro wrote:

Reaching back a bit, keriflur wrote:

I'm curious to hear how you like Wool.  I read the sample (the first two pages only), but it didn't draw me in enough to spend the ninety-nine cents.  I am exceedingly picky, though, and there have been a lot of books that, once I stuck it out, I came to enjoy.

 

 

I finished Blackbirds, which I enjoyed, but wasn't compelled by. I'm about 100 pages into the Wool omnibus. So far, I'm enjoying it, and do pick up my tablet just to read it. I like "lost past" post-apocalyptic stories in general, and this one's well written. I haven't gotten to any huge reveals yet, but it's smoothly written, with no jarring inconsistencies or lingering question marks. The one "big surprise" so far actually surprised me as I read the last line of the chapter. There are plenty of hints, but the writing was good enough that I didn't pick up on it. Blackbirds zoomed in on a handful of characters without really explaining how they got to be what they are. This one is painting a whole society and giving enough passing references to figure out how things got to be. I think I like the "it's not all about me" aspect.

 

(Yes, this belongs elsewhere, but I wanted to reply in-thread.)


Interesting.  I may have to read a bit more and see if I like it.

 

To be honest, it was the writing in the sample that pushed me away from buying it.  His prose felt a bit purple, as if he was trying to be lyrical but didn't know how to evoke the feeling of the event without a plethora of modifiers.  But if the story's good, I can deal with the purpleness to a point.

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bobstro
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Re: So I finished Blackbirds and have started on Wool...

keriflur wrote:

To be honest, it was the writing in the sample that pushed me away from buying it.  His prose felt a bit purple, as if he was trying to be lyrical but didn't know how to evoke the feeling of the event without a plethora of modifiers. 

 

The sample was the first few pages of the first chapter, right? I'll have to look at them again. I know the book starts with a line about "climbing to his death", and I do recall thinking he'd better deliver. IMO, he did well enough. He does go to great lengths to emphasize the age of the place, but I think he's managed to get across that the place is "modern" (for us), yet old and somewhat decrepit (for the characters) without giving a history of how it got that way. Mind you, I'm no expert, but I am enjoying it. I recall marveling at how worn stone statues were after 750 years (lions worn down to nubs), so imaging steel stairs worn and aged struck a chord with me.

 

But if the story's good, I can deal with the purpleness to a point.

 

 

I think I like his style better than attempts to be edgy with language. A mood or setting means a lot more to me than words out of a character's mouth. I spent some time in my youth working with, and getting to know German WWII veterans and survivors. A setting can evoke feelings of dread and horror far without a word of profanity in my mind. Not that I'm a prude. It's just that a good setting frames things so well.