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gb18
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Registered: ‎12-06-2010
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Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?

[ Edited ]
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bobstro
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Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?

As I read it, the author is making the case that B&N has potential, but without the NOOK line or digital ebooks (emphasis mine): "... Yet here is where the Best Buy analogy comes into play. Barnes & Noble sells products (books and magazines) that will always be in demand. Yes, digital downloads have taken some wind out of those categories. But for many, perusing a hard copy in a comfortable retail environment is still the preferred method of buying."

 

He also mentions that B&N is getting out of building hardware themselves, though that seems to be based on old information.

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deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012

Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?


bobstro wrote:

As I read it, the author is making the case that B&N has potential, but without the NOOK line or digital ebooks (emphasis mine): "... Yet here is where the Best Buy analogy comes into play. Barnes & Noble sells products (books and magazines) that will always be in demand. Yes, digital downloads have taken some wind out of those categories. But for many, perusing a hard copy in a comfortable retail environment is still the preferred method of buying."

 

He also mentions that B&N is getting out of building hardware themselves, though that seems to be based on old information.


I agree, to an extent, with bobstro's assessment (Surprise!!).  I'm not sure, however, that I agree with the author's assertion that digital downloads have merely taken the wind out of some categories, but that the move (however slowly) from DTBs to e-books is inevitable, and will, eventually, make the Barnes and Noble brick & mortar book stores unsustainable.  The fact that "for many, perusing a hard copy in a comfortable retail environment is still the preferred method of buying" is insufficient to support the very large chain of B&M stores over the long run.  "Many" is a vague term, and it might very well refer to a smaller and smaller segment of the market. 

 

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TnTexas
Posts: 883
Registered: ‎10-22-2011

Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?

As books eventually replaced scrolls, I fully expect that ereaders will replace physical books one day - barring any apocalyptic scenarios, of course. I don't think that day's will come during my lifetime or even the lifetimes of my children. My grandchildren's? Maybe, but more likely those of my great-grandchildren or later.

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patgolfneb
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Registered: ‎09-10-2011

Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?

As long as e readers require recharging there is a justification for DTB's. Of course for real permanence we could bring back stone tablets.:smileywink:

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MacMcK1957
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Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?


patgolfneb wrote:

As long as e readers require recharging there is a justification for DTB's. Of course for real permanence we could bring back stone tablets.:smileywink:


Let's see.  I spend over 90% of my life in my home, workplace or car, all of which have readily available sources for recharging.  So maybe the need for DTBs escapes me.

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Mercury_Glitch
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Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?

[ Edited ]

I can see the arguement for DTBs over LCD ereaders, where it's fairly easy to run down the battery in a day.  But the eink ereaders should easily last longer than a person can go without sleep.  And on average you'll sleep for longer than the ereader needs to get a full charge. 

 

So maybe if you were going to go somewhere without a power source for an extended period of time I think eink ereaders are well positioned to replace DTBs. 

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,173
Registered: ‎07-25-2011

Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?


Mercury_Glitch wrote:

...

So maybe if you were going to go somewhere without a power source for an extended period of time I think eink ereaders are well positioned to replace DTBs. 


My idea of roughing it is a hotel that doesn't have HBO.  "somewhere without a power source for an extended period of time" is not an option.

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TnTexas
Posts: 883
Registered: ‎10-22-2011

Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?

patgolfneb: As long as e readers require recharging there is a justification for DTB's. Of course for real permanence we could bring back stone tablets.:smileywink:

 

Someone around the time cars were being invented: "As long as those new-fangled cars require gasoline there is a justification for the horse and buggy."

 

My point is simply that barring cataclysmic events which totally destroy all knowledge of it, technology marches on. Today the vast majority of people in developed countries travel around by gas-powered vehicles of one kind or another, making the horse and buggy pretty much a thing of the past. At some point, a similar thing will eventually happen with physical books and ereaders. 

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patgolfneb
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Re: Is This The Next Great Retail Turnaround?


TnTexas wrote:

patgolfneb: As long as e readers require recharging there is a justification for DTB's. Of course for real permanence we could bring back stone tablets.:smileywink:

 

Someone around the time cars were being invented: "As long as those new-fangled cars require gasoline there is a justification for the horse and buggy."

 

My point is simply that barring cataclysmic events which totally destroy all knowledge of it, technology marches on. Today the vast majority of people in developed countries travel around by gas-powered vehicles of one kind or another, making the horse and buggy pretty much a thing of the past. At some point, a similar thing will eventually happen with physical books and ereaders. 


I guess my effort at irony was a failure. I referred to stone tablets as my way of highlighting the examples weakness and that people have always resisted progress.  If men were meant to fly God would have given us wings response is as old as time.