Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Distinguished Bibliophile
MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,301
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: Wild idea?

Also, the idea of mini-B&Ns that only stock bestsellers sounds like a losing idea to me.

 

If memory serves, B&N and Borders both had them, B. Dalton and Waldenbooks, in pretty much every major mall in the country.  They failed.

Distinguished Bibliophile
patgolfneb
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
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Re: Wild idea?


MacMcK1957 wrote:

Also, the idea of mini-B&Ns that only stock bestsellers sounds like a losing idea to me.

 

If memory serves, B&N and Borders both had them, B. Dalton and Waldenbooks, in pretty much every major mall in the country.  They failed.


I think they sold more magazines and newspapers than books. I wonder how much longer even the meager offerings in grocery and quickie marts  can remain viable. 

Wordsmith
doncr
Posts: 493
Registered: ‎12-29-2010
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Re: Wild idea?

keriflur wrote:

The idea of moving to smaller stores overall (ideally with a broader selection than just the bestsellers) is one we've discussed here before.  I think it's the natural progression given that the market has shifted.  When most of the B&N bookstores opened, the market was 90-100% physical books (this is a guesstimate), and now that market is shared with ebooks, so less physical space is needed.  However, B&N can't just break all their leases and rent new, smaller locations, so this is something that will have to happen over time.

 

Another option would be B&N subleasing a portion of their store to someone else that wants to cater to bookstore shoppers.  Offhand I don't know who that would be though.  Maybe some company that sells cat toys.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 4,062
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: Wild idea?

What I'm unclear on is whether B&N will still be selling ebooks if the NOOK is spun off or killed. If B&N still is selling ebooks when the dust clears, I think the kiosk approach is a relatively low-cost way to be more pervasive without having to open up a bunch of expensive new stores.

 

I have no idea how well those Best Buy airport kiosks are doing, but I am sure seeing a lot of them these days, and they're selling pricey ($300) headphones out of them. Even if B&N remains print-only, would a paperback vending machine in high-traffic areas such as airports work? Rather than best-sellers, stock it at least partially with titles oriented towards business travellers, and a few kids' books for desperate parents. (Of course, POD was supposed to fill this role, but I've yet to see one in the wild.)

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,832
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Wild idea?


bobstro wrote:
(Of course, POD was supposed to fill this role, but I've yet to see one in the wild.)

How long does it take to print a book with a POD machine?  I'm wondering if the time would be prohibitive in the airport.

 

For bestsellers, I'd imagine it's faster to pick up an already printed copy in the airport bookstore, but for mid- and backlist, if it doesnt take too long, it might work out.  I'd imagine the sales would be few and far between tho.

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 4,062
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: Wild idea?

I'm not sure on an actual PoD machine, but we've got a high-end Ricoh copier in one office with all sorts of binding, folding and stapling features, and I can print a book-sized document inside of 10 minutes. The problem -- and this is probably why I haven't seen PoD in the wild -- is that it is very finicky and prone to jam. It probably couldn't be unmanned in reality.

 

The plus to a small kiosk is that it can run 7x24 in a minimal amount of space. Ideal for ebooks, audiobooks or a vending machine with some well-targeted paperbacks.

 

From the scenes I witnessed at Philly and Boston airports last week, people were sprawled out all over each airport desperately squinting at phones and well-worn magazines. I imagine sales would have been brisk! Those who'd staked out their territory around AC power outlets would have no doubt gone for digital entertainment, at least until the food gave out.

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 4,062
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Paper book vending machines -- a long history

[ Edited ]

I just found an article giving a history of paper book vending machines. They're an old idea, but one that keeps resurfacing. Many have failed, but the article indicates a few seem to be gaining traction in Europe. I haven't noticed any selling ebooks along the lines of digiboo's video offerings.

 

I like the "Collect all 112 million titles" tag line on the Biblio-mat.

Reader
northernsmiles
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-19-2011

Re: Nook future plans article

[ Edited ]

I love my nook and never leave home without it! I was truly shocked when the new HD Nook tablets were released that Barnes and Noble did not market it strong against the Kindle Fire. The HD tablet was released and not a big marketing campaign. Also, Barnes and Noble missed that woman love having many Nook covers just like owning several purses. The HD tablet was released with very few covers and not many of them appealing to woman. Holiday time and birthdays are great gift ideas for woman who love a new cover just like a new purse. I also thought another great idea would have been a trade in program when purchasing a new Nook. The traded in models could have been factory reset and donated to education or the military for the wounded. Lastly I cannot say enough about the marketing of the HD was not done with a hugh campaign to keep up with the other book reader competition. MARKETING, MARKETING leads to SELL, SELL to SUCCESS!!!

Barnes and Noble you do have the best e-reader in the market. Please do not give up!

Wordsmith
TnTexas
Posts: 897
Registered: ‎10-22-2011
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Re: Nook future plans article

[ Edited ]

northernsmiles: Also, Barnes and Noble missed that woman love having many Nook covers just like owning several purses.

 

Some might, but I don't One cover is fine for me. I usually only use one purse at a time too. I hate moving things around. I do agree that a larger, more varied selection would have been nice, though.

 

The HD tablet was released with very few covers and not many of them appealing to woman.

 

This was odd concerning who they've said their main target/customer is. Maybe they thought "Julie" was so intimidated by technology she was too afraid to change out the Nook's cover once she'd figured out how to get it in there.

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 4,062
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: Nook future plans article

B&N did seem to be doing well with those expensive NOOK covers for a long time. Once the 3rd party covers began to show up at half the price, I'm sure they were leery of winding up with overstock. There seemed to be a good selection from other sources last time I noticed.