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Paul_Hochman
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

January 17th, 2001

Gregory Corso, poet and core member of the Beat Generation, dies in Minnesota. Ginsberg called Corso the “poet’s poet” and in the spirit of that grand moniker, Corso’s remains reside next to the great Romantic, Percy Bysshe Shelley.

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Paul_Hochman
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

January 18th, 1989

Bruce Chatwin, the British travel writer and the author of In Patagonia, dies in Nice, France. Despite having a Fatwa declared on him the very same day of the memorial service, Salman Rushdie would be attendance to bid farewell to his old friend Chatwin.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
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Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: On This Day in Literary History

 


PaulH wrote:

January 18th, 1989

Bruce Chatwin, the British travel writer and the author of In Patagonia, dies in Nice, France. Despite having a Fatwa declared on him the very same day of the memorial service, Salman Rushdie would be attendance to bid farewell to his old friend Chatwin.


 

In Patagonia was probably his most famous work.  It was one of the very earliest selections of my face-to-face book club. The Wikipedia entry for Chatwin, which I just quickly browsed, suggests several tidbits about his life of which I was unaware.  It includes a list of his other works and one paragraph has a brief description of each.  I didn't find Chatwin an easy read, but certainly worthwhile, despite the controversy around his extent of fictionalization of supposedly more journalistically positioned accounts.  (To date, I have not explored his oeuvre further.)

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

January 18th, 2010

Robert B. Parker, the legendary mystery author and the creator of Spenser, passed away last night. A friend of mine had lunch with him recently and he said that Parker was "Still boxing and working out and as passionate as ever about the Celts, the Sox, writing and writers too!"

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Paul_Hochman
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

January 19th, 1809

Edgar Allan Poe, the author of The Raven and the Tell-Tale Heart, is born in Boston, Massachusetts. Fittingly, the nominees for the 2010 Edgar Awards -- the Mystery Writers of America's most prestigious honor -- were announced on Poe's birthday. For a full list of the nominees click here. I'm personally pulling for Jo Nesbo's Nemesis and Meg Abbott's Bury Me Deep.

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Paul_Hochman
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

[ Edited ]

January 20th, 1930

Buzz Aldrin, legendary astronaut and the author of Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon, is born in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. Watch our Tagged! Interview with Aldrin.

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

[ Edited ]

Love Story  Erich Segal died . He was 72..I wonder if he is still read today?  Vtc

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Wordsmith
RTA
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Re: On This Day in Literary History


PaulH wrote:

January 19th, 1809

Edgar Allan Poe, the author of The Raven and the Tell-Tale Heart, is born in Boston, Massachusetts.


 

Alas, the Poe Toaster--the person (or persons) toasting Poe's Baltimore grave on his birthday since 1949--was a no show yesterday

 

Now I'm not a particular Poe fan, but that was a fairly cool tradition.

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Paul_Hochman
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

[ Edited ]

January 21st, 1950

George Orwell, the author of 1984 and Animal Farm, dies in London. A Democratic Socialist, Orwell rallied against Fascism and Totalitarianism in both his writing and his life -- he was shot through the throat fighting against the Fascists in the Spanish Civil War. Many of Orwell's quotes are as prescient today as the day they were written; they include "Big Brother is watching you" and "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act."

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Paul_Hochman
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Re: On This Day in Literary History

[ Edited ]

January 22nd, 1788

Lord Byron, the English Poet who was "mad, bad, and dangerous to know", is born in London. Edward Trelawney's Recollections of the Last Days of Shelley and Byron -- while a bit fabricated in part -- is one of the best books I've read on the Romantics.