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New User
JavaGirl13
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-12-2010
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Re: :Publishers not adhering to $9.99 pricing

You're right! I do feel snookered. I justified buying a nook on the premise that it would be nice to share titles with friends and also if I averaged my book buying habits, I would end up saving money. This is not the case as they continue to creep up the pricing of each book and take away the lending capabilities. Shame on them.

 

Let me know if you decide to file suit. I'm in.

Bibliophile
bklvr896
Posts: 4,818
Registered: ‎12-31-2009
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Re: :Publishers not adhering to $9.99 pricing

I think the problem you are going to run into in trying to force prices down can be best illustrated by Ken Follett's Fall of Giants.  The eBook price is $19.99, which I won't pay for any fiction book, regardless of the format.  However, enough people disagree with me to the point that yesterday it was #9 on the top selling eBooks at B&N and #12 for Kindle.  That means a lot of people weren't at all bothered by the $19.99 price tag.

 

I don't have an issue with new releases costing $12.99 or so, it's a choice I make whether or not to buy a book when it first comes out.  Did this with HC, do it now with eBooks.  Amazon set an unrealistic expectation with its $9.99 price point.  They were taking a loss on those books, which a company like Amazon can afford to do, set up the book as a loss leader, then can add $10.00 to the price of something else they sell to make it up.  Other retailers, including B&N really don't have that option.

 

However, since half of the top selling eBooks today are at $12.99 or higher, apparently a lot of people feel this price point is ok and are willing to spend it to read a book.

Distinguished Correspondent
avid_reader1590
Posts: 185
Registered: ‎12-28-2009
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Re: :Publishers not adhering to $9.99 pricing

I wonder what books two and three of this trilogy will cost if people are buying #one at $19.99? All I can say is when the price gets to where even the big spenders can’t afford it remember all the protesters here.....Cause we will be ether at the library or reading a borrowed hb.  :smileyhappy:

It is better to stir up a question without deciding it, than to decide it without stirring it up. ~Joseph Joubert


Distinguished Correspondent
avid_reader1590
Posts: 185
Registered: ‎12-28-2009
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Re: :Publishers not adhering to $9.99 pricing

just  checked now and Fall of Giants eBook is #10 on B&N and #17 on Amazon. Stieg Larrsson’  trilogy is ahead of this book and they have been out a long time.....but they are in a decent price range too. I know that Mr Follett’s book would be way higher on the charts except for the high price. I started my hb yesterday and it is a really good book....would have loved reading it on the Nook but at least I am reading it. 

It is better to stir up a question without deciding it, than to decide it without stirring it up. ~Joseph Joubert


New User
amckenzie4
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-14-2010
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Re: :Publishers not adhering to $9.99 pricing

Sooner or later, the $10+ eBook will go the way of the $20 music CD:  people will just plain stop buying them.

 

I'm unwilling to take a pirated copy of anything when the legal version is available, which means I haven't gotten much new music since around 2000.  But a year or so ago, I started finding that I could get digital copies of music I liked on-line, for $10/album or $1/song.  I immediately went through the list of music I'd been wanting, and spent around $200 on music.  Some of that was full albums, but mostly it was single songs.

 

Now... clearly that doesn't map precisely to books.  Right now I buy a lot of used books, get some things from the library, and there are a few authors I buy new regardless of the price.  As the price of paperbacks has gone up and the quality has gone down, I've found myself buying fewer books.  At $5 for a book that'll last 20 years, I feel well served.  At $6 for a book that'll last 5 years, I bought fewer, but I still bought them.  Now I'm paying $8 for something that will start showing wear after the first reading, and will start losing pages after three or four readings.  I still buy hard-copy of my favorite authors new -- I want them to keep writing, after all! -- but most things I buy used.  It's going to fall apart soon anyway, at least this way I won't have paid much for it.

 

Electronic books have the opportunity, eventually, to do the same to regular publishing that mp3 has done to music publishing.  Right now, a band can produce their music on their own, turn it into MP3 files, and sell it online.  Between PubIt and similar services run by other companies, the same thing becomes possible.  Authors -- good or bad -- can publish their own work.  They won't get the benefits a publisher brings,  like advertising, editing, sending review copies to reviewers, and so on, but the book will be out there.  If it's good enough, they may even sell a few copies.  And if the price is low enough, they might sell enough copies to compensate for the loss of advertising.

 

For now, though, all we can do is vote with our dollars:  avoid buying things we think are too expensive, and buy lots of the stuff at prices we think are reasonable.