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Contributor
David_Burrows
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎11-08-2008
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Re: Read My Book!

Book 1 Of The Prophecy Of The Kings 

 

Book 2 Of The Prophecy Of The Kings  

Book 3 Of The Prophecy Of The Kings  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the latest rave reviews at Science Fiction and fantasy or read sample chapters at Prophecy of the Kings

 

The books are getting good reviews and is recommended by most! If you like fantasy then this should be just for you. Save money and buy the Omnibus version

Prophecy Of The Kings 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good reading


David :smileyhappy:

David Burrows
Author of the Prophecy of the Kings
http://davidburrows.org.uk/
Contributor
Wizard4ebooks
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎06-22-2010
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Re: Not Just For Breakfast Anymore

Hi PV,

I've posted your book's details on my ebook site: www.wizard4ebooks.com. It's linked back to Barnes and Noble (I'm an affiliate). Please check out my site. Over time you can post any updated reviews as comments.Also feel free to hit the share button and spread the word.

Wizard4ebooks is new and I have some exciting ideas for front page articles in the future. I hope to encourage writer participation in exchange for good exposure.

Anyway, like the idea of the pig story and I'll get to read it sometime, I am sure.

Best Wishes,

Anthony.

Wizard4ebooks
Contributor
davidhburton
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎05-15-2010
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Re: Not Just For Breakfast Anymore

The Goodreads discussion of The Second Coming is starting soon for those that have read it, or are interested in reading it.

http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/10915.Fantasy_Book_Club

 

 

The Second Coming

 

 

David H. Burton
http://davidhburton.com
Author of The Second Coming and Scourge
New User
FAndresen
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎06-30-2010
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Re: Dos Gringos by Frederick R. Andresen

Dear Friends, I thought you would like to read about my new book “Dos Gringos” based on a true story told me by my father some years ago over beans and tacos in a Phoenix restaurant. It is a fast and entertaining read. See the review in the El Paso Times: http://www.elpasotimes.com/ci_15285818?IADID=Search-www.elpasotimes.com- www.elpasotimes.com ) See also the growing Amazon and B&N reader reviews. Dos Gringos “A Norwegian and an Irishman meet in a Texas bar…” In the middle of the Mexican Revolution, a penniless Norwegian and a drifting Irishman meet in an El Paso bar and are hired by a Pittsburg con-man to fix a gold mine in Mexico with parts which, they discover too late, purposely don’t fit. Arthur, the Norwegian, is focused on fixing the mine and needs the money to propose to his love in El Paso. Michael, the Irishman, is focused on the local women, is fresh from Ireland’s bloody Easter Uprising, and needs to redeem a painful guilt and find a new life. They both are at gunpoint to perform or not perform. Their mutual distrust fades in the face of guns from the warring sides and they must work together to survive and escape back to Texas. Complicating their mission is a mysterious black-suited man selling guns to both sides in the Mexican war, part of Germany’s intrigue to keep America out of World War I—and a German and Brit are there to spy on each other. And then there is The Hawk, a commander for Pancho Villa, who chases the pair across the Chihuahua desert to catch the Irishman who violated his niece. Texas is far away. Note: This novel is based on the true story of my Norwegian immigrant father, my mother, and her father, my namesake grandfather, the German gun runner. Available on-line from Amazon and Barnes & Noble and from book stores Frederick R. Andresen Corona del Mar, CA fred@andresen.com www.fandresen.com
New User
FAndresen
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎06-30-2010
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Re: Walking on Ice, an American Businessman in Russia

Walking on Ice. An American Businessman in Russia. By Frederick R. Andresen Reviewed by Andrei Zolotov, Jr. Russia Profile Confessions of a Russophile Walking on Ice, by Frederick R. Andresen Outskirts Press Inc., Denver, Colorado, 2007 142 pages Of the legion of Western entrepreneurs who came to Russia in the early 1990s in search of opportunities, many came here guided not just by greed, but by a quest for adventure. A fair number came with a missionary zeal for spreading Western business practices and values to the “Communist land.” Some were drawn by family connections, others felt they could do here what they would never be allowed to do in their home countries. And there were many whose motivation combined all of the above and more. But there were few who had become infatuated with Russian culture and, once the country opened up, saw a chance to deepen and broaden their knowledge, to learn first hand from personal relationships. They built their businesses as a cultural matchmaking of sorts. They had the inquisitive minds and open hearts of cultural interpreters, which helped push their projects in the land, where, as one such person, Frederick R. Andresen put it, “everything is difficult—and everything is possible.” Andresen, who lived in Russia from 1992 to 1998 and currently runs his Russian telecom business out of California, has put his insightful observations into a tenderly written, concise book, which is neither an academic study, nor a memoir; neither a business manual, nor a cultural history. Yet it somehow manages to serve all these purposes and can be recommended as an easy and highly educational read for aspiring Russia scholars and people preparing for a tour of duty in Russia. Essentially, it is a collection of essays, although one part of the book is structured in chapters on Russian geography, demography, culture, business and politics, while the other is simply called “An Essay Collection.” These pages bear an openly Chekhovian description of a weekend spent at the dacha with an extended Russian family next to a carefully worded account of the role of crime and corruption in business practices and how they can be worked around; a tribute to Boris Pasternak next to a report about the October 1993 revolt and the shelling of parliament from an unusual perspective of a businessman whose operation was headquartered in the Comecon building at the very center of those dramatic events. The author analyzes the role of the Orthodox Church in shaping the Russian psyche and identity, and categorizes Russian women in types which would make some of them blush. What brings these essays together is a transpiring love for both the strengths and weaknesses of this country and its people. Andresen was clearly intrigued by the “Russian soul” and made an unpretentious and humorous contribution to unwrapping the “mystery inside the enigma.” It rings true even to a skeptical Russian reader instinctively ready to catch factual or contextual flaws in a “naïve foreigner’s” reflection on his country. One of the book’s high points is the account of how the author applied Dostoyevsky’s “The Grand Inquisitor” chapter to business management. Three things are generic to the traditional Russian character, Andresen wrote, referring to Dostoyevsky: “the idea that good, if any, will come from some unexpected outside source (miracle); that man is not ordained to be responsible for his own welfare and progress (mystery); and that guidance and protection come only from constant dependence on and obedience to someone else (authority). There is a reversion to this in today’s Russian government. That situation is pressing to be changed by the young, but it seems always there under the surface.” For business people without a background in Russian studies embarking on a Russia-related project, Andresen gives a short reading list: “The Icon and the Ax” by James Billington, “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky and “The Castle” by Franz Kafka. “Walking on Ice” would certainly complement the list—it can be consumed in one trans-Atlantic flight. © Russia Profile.org 2008
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Walking on Ice, an American Businessman in Russia

 FAndresen

 

Please repost your push for your book with some breaks that make your post readable.  The topic sounds interesting to me -- and probably to some of my friends who have lived in Russia and tried to help open the telecom business there.  But, if this is the way the book reads, may not even try!

 

Sorry to be so harsh, but I presume you are the writer and I expect certain skills, sort of liking deciding what clothes to wear to an interview and whether to clean the dirt out from under one's fingernails.  (If it didn't appear as you intended --  I had that trouble today -- the options on the upper right permit editing for about 90 minutes after posting.  For some reason, I did have to use a little chicanery today to get a blank line between paragraphs, but it can be done.)

 

Pepper


FAndresen wrote:
Walking on Ice. An American Businessman in Russia. By Frederick R. Andresen Reviewed by Andrei Zolotov, Jr. Russia Profile Confessions of a Russophile Walking on Ice, by Frederick R. Andresen Outskirts Press Inc., Denver, Colorado, 2007 142 pages Of the legion of Western entrepreneurs who came to Russia in the early 1990s in search of opportunities, many came here guided not just by greed, but by a quest for adventure. A fair number came with a missionary zeal for spreading Western business practices and values to the “Communist land.” Some were drawn by family connections, others felt they could do here what they would never be allowed to do in their home countries. And there were many whose motivation combined all of the above and more. But there were few who had become infatuated with Russian culture and, once the country opened up, saw a chance to deepen and broaden their knowledge, to learn first hand from personal relationships. They built their businesses as a cultural matchmaking of sorts. They had the inquisitive minds and open hearts of cultural interpreters, which helped push their projects in the land, where, as one such person, Frederick R. Andresen put it, “everything is difficult—and everything is possible.” Andresen, who lived in Russia from 1992 to 1998 and currently runs his Russian telecom business out of California, has put his insightful observations into a tenderly written, concise book, which is neither an academic study, nor a memoir; neither a business manual, nor a cultural history. Yet it somehow manages to serve all these purposes and can be recommended as an easy and highly educational read for aspiring Russia scholars and people preparing for a tour of duty in Russia. Essentially, it is a collection of essays, although one part of the book is structured in chapters on Russian geography, demography, culture, business and politics, while the other is simply called “An Essay Collection.” These pages bear an openly Chekhovian description of a weekend spent at the dacha with an extended Russian family next to a carefully worded account of the role of crime and corruption in business practices and how they can be worked around; a tribute to Boris Pasternak next to a report about the October 1993 revolt and the shelling of parliament from an unusual perspective of a businessman whose operation was headquartered in the Comecon building at the very center of those dramatic events. The author analyzes the role of the Orthodox Church in shaping the Russian psyche and identity, and categorizes Russian women in types which would make some of them blush. What brings these essays together is a transpiring love for both the strengths and weaknesses of this country and its people. Andresen was clearly intrigued by the “Russian soul” and made an unpretentious and humorous contribution to unwrapping the “mystery inside the enigma.” It rings true even to a skeptical Russian reader instinctively ready to catch factual or contextual flaws in a “naïve foreigner’s” reflection on his country. One of the book’s high points is the account of how the author applied Dostoevsky’s “The Grand Inquisitor” chapter to business management. Three things are generic to the traditional Russian character, Andresen wrote, referring to Dostoyevsky: “the idea that good, if any, will come from some unexpected outside source (miracle); that man is not ordained to be responsible for his own welfare and progress (mystery); and that guidance and protection come only from constant dependence on and obedience to someone else (authority). There is a reversion to this in today’s Russian government. That situation is pressing to be changed by the young, but it seems always there under the surface.” For business people without a background in Russian studies embarking on a Russia-related project, Andresen gives a short reading list: “The Icon and the Ax” by James Billington, “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky and “The Castle” by Franz Kafka. “Walking on Ice” would certainly complement the list—it can be consumed in one trans-Atlantic flight. © Russia Profile.org 2008

 

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
New User
DianeL
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎07-06-2010
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Re: Read My Book! The Blessing Next to the Wound by Hector Aristizabal and Diane Lefer

Hector Aristizábal came of age in Medellín, Colombia–at the time, the most dangerous city in the world. He’s been arrested and suffered torture: beatings, water-boarding, mock executions, electric shock to the genitals, and more. Friends standing by his side fell to sudden bursts of machine-gun fire. He watched his youngest brother turn to crack cocaine to ease the pain of homophobia, then paradoxically give up drugs while working for a boss of the cocaine cartel, only to die of AIDS. When another brother was abducted, tortured and killed by a death squad, he photographed the mutilated body in order to pursue a dangerous quest for justice.

          Hector struggled his way up from poverty in Colombia to gain a university education and achieve prominent social standing as an actor, playwright and director as well as a pioneering psychologist. He lost it all when he had to flee into exile, arriving in the US without money or connections or knowledge of English--but with a desire for revenge he transformed, instead, to constructive, nonviolent action.

          This book invites the reader to travel from a war-torn country into exile, to a workshop bringing Palestinian activists and Israeli rabbinical students together, from schoolrooms to deathbeds, to the worlds of gang members, prisoners, transgendered people, public school students and teachers, pregnant teens, police departments, immigrant families, torture survivors, union members, activists, and ordinary people with heartaches and questions. To journey with Hector is to be challenged, often shocked, but always inspired.

For some reason, the Barnes and Noble site omitted the cover image and blurbs -- so you can find out more here:

http://www.lanternbooks.com/detail.html?session=6069a609cf723ff67fa62d1f52fc857e&cat=14&id=978159056...

but order it through B&N here:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Blessing-Next-to-the-Wound/Hector-Aristizabal/e/9781590561713/?...

Thanks!

Contributor
AnnieRuthreadinglounge
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎08-09-2009
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Re: Read My Book!

A salt water author who grew up in a  small Geechee and Gullah community talks about the dark period in American history. www.tellinourstories,com

New User
Guggeneim
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎07-15-2010
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Guggenheim Manifesto by R. Guggenheim

[ Edited ]

byGuggenheim

An interesting & personal account on:
love
Philosophy
Life
Psychology
good
evil
self
Heaven
Hell
awareness
idealism
NWO
utopia
2012
homeopathy
mind-control
existentialist
Guggenheim
neo-existentialism


This book is the beginning. It is far from being over. This is the beginning.

I have posted the full text for free at http://www.scribd.com/doc/24606747/Guggenheim-Manifesto
and you can find a fan page on FaceBook if you'd like.

Any interested Publishers or Editors or any interested Collaborators, feel free to message me on FB in any form.

It is short, and bitter-sweet. There can easily be a sequel or longer version once I feel it is worth the effort from any fans that would care to know more.
Thanks for your time!
-Guggenheim

Contributor
David_Burrows
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎11-08-2008
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Re: Read My Book!

Prophecy of the Kings is now book of the month (July) on Science Fiction and Fantasy website: http://www.sciencefictionandfantasy.co.uk/

 

If you are a fantasy fan this could be just right for you.

David Burrows
Author of the Prophecy of the Kings
http://davidburrows.org.uk/