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Omnigeek
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Re: Sony 13.3" e-Reader Begins Trials

If I am going to carry my briefcase or backpack, I'd rather have my Macbook Pro than a 9- or 10-inch tablet. My range bag has room for the 13-inch ereader or 15-inch notebook so why restrict myself with a dinky display? On the other hand, when I'm hiking or just walking about town, I like having a reader or tablet that I can slip into my pocket rather than carry a bag (my camera rides in a hip holster or around my neck if I'm taking pictures). The 7-inch Nook Color/Tablet/HD all do that just fine. I realize my needs/desires are not common but my preference for larger displays and more computing power is precisely why Steve Jobs' "perfect" size of 9.7 inches was precisely the wrong size, the worst of both worlds, to me. I mention this only because of the implied assumption from so many posters that 9-10 inches works for them so it must be perfect for everyone else.
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bobstro
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Registered: ‎01-01-2012

Re: Sony 13.3" e-Reader Begins Trials

[ Edited ]

TnTexas wrote:

Me: Funny how "perfect" for one person isn't for the next.  :smileysurprised:)

 

That little guy is supposed to be a smiley face made out of text characters . 


He looks like he got surprised with his left hand in the cookie jar.

 

 

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bobstro
Posts: 4,055
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: Sony 13.3" e-Reader Begins Trials

[ Edited ]

Omnigeek wrote:
If I am going to carry my briefcase or backpack, I'd rather have my Macbook Pro than a 9- or 10-inch tablet. [...]

 

For my purposes, an eInk device fits into an altogether different niche than my everyday tablet. It's for home, or vacation, beach or other outdoor use, so I'm not assuming I will have a bag with me. It's not going into my "everyday carry" kit. It needs to be handy enough to carry or toss in a beach or cooler bag, large enough (7-8 inch is probably ideal) to read comfortably, and outdoor display readable in direct sunlight, and have tremendous battery life. While I can (and do) read on 5-6 inch eInk devices, I'd like to fit a bit more on the screen to minimize paging. As I understand it, screen refreshes are what eats battery on eInk devices, so any additional power requirements for a bigger screen might be offset by fewer/less frequent refreshes.

 

Whether Sony sends up selling it won't be so important if they can demonstrate a demand for larger eInk screen sizes. Kobo tried something different with the Aura HD display and upped the game. I'm glad to see some new things being tried with displays that'll meet my wants.

 

DeanGibson
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George Carlin's "stuff"

[ Edited ]

This all reminds me of George Carlin's "stuff" (if you're not familiar, search Google):  "The supply lines are getting pretty long".

 

It also reminds me of flight students who show up at the airport with a huge "captain's bag", just to emulate the airline captains they see carry at the airport.  If you talk to one of the airline captains, none of them want to be carrying all that stuff, mostly charts and manuals weighing up to 50 lbs or so.  They all long for their airline to adopt EFBs.  An EFB ("Electronic Flight Bag" -- the FAA loves abbreviations) is simply a tablet (or tablet-like device) like an iPad or Nook.

 

Of course, the classic "murse" for decades has been the back seat of most cars.  I have a friend that used to have to clear out the right front seat of "stuff" whenever I would ride with him;  his back seats were uninhabitable not due to size but content.

 

Then of course for the truly compulsive, there is the motor home.  Towing your car.

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bobstro
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Re: George Carlin's "stuff"

The danger is that any time you stick anything electronic in your everyday carry bag, you are compelled (this is humor, for those upset at this point) to put in a charger, cable, maybe a light or spare battery 'just in case". Then there's the Advil for your aching shoulder... Your bag, indeed, becomes Carlin's "house" for the road, growing a bit fuller every day.

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keriflur
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Re: George Carlin's "stuff"


bobstro wrote:

The danger is that any time you stick anything electronic in your everyday carry bag, you are compelled (this is humor, for those upset at this point) to put in a charger, cable, maybe a light or spare battery 'just in case". Then there's the Advil for your aching shoulder... Your bag, indeed, becomes Carlin's "house" for the road, growing a bit fuller every day.


This is why I always try to carry the smallest bag that will do the job - otherwise, it just gathers stuff.
FWIW, there is as much variation in what women want to carry as in what men want to carry - the assumption that all women like purses, or color coordinate their purses, or whatever, is a false one.  For me, I've only started carrying a bag regularly since moving to Seattle - I had to buy a car, and phones have grown in size, making the phone-wallet-keys combo too big for the microscopic pockets on women's jeans.
I don't think briefcases, messengers, and laptop bags are murses.  Murses, well, look like purses.
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bobstro
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Re: George Carlin's "stuff"

[ Edited ]
[DISCLAIMER: Humorous intent follows. If you are humor impaired, consult with a doctor before reading the following.]
keriflur wrote:
[...] This is why I always try to carry the smallest bag that will do the job - otherwise, it just gathers stuff.
My latest is a mini-messenger with a few pouches attached so that it almost exaclty fits what I need to carry. If there's spare room, I always seem to fill it up. I finally went over the limit with one of those giant rolling computer bags. My buddy hurt his elbow badly when he lifted his over a curb and it twisted in the air. I can exactly fit my 12.5 inch laptop (though it sticks out a bit out of the main compartment), AC adapter and cord, 10 inch tablet, 1 magazine, 5V adapter & 2 USB cables, sunglasses (Arizona travel) and some advil (migraines from bright light). If it won't fit in there, it goes in my checked bag. It's great not fretting about overhead space on the plane anymore, plus I get to act all self-righteous watching those folks with two big bags argue that one is a "personal item."
FWIW, there is as much variation in what women want to carry as in what men want to carry - the assumption that all women like purses, or color coordinate their purses, or whatever, is a false one. 
In my (admittedly limited) experience, changing purses can be a traumatic experience. I know some people have one for different outfits and occasions, but I think most people like to have certain things in certain places. I can't think why women would vary from men in this regard. I know I hate changing computer bags.
[...] I don't think briefcases, messengers, and laptop bags are murses.  Murses, well, look like purses.
I know the type you mean, but I do think there's also a "purse mindset" that separates the traditional "Buck knife on the belt and chain on the wallet" manly perspective from the "I may need tissues and lip balm" view. I admit it: While my bag might not be a "murse", it's an "undercover purse" made of tactical black nylon. Since laptops became commonplace, I don't think this is as big a deal as it used to be. I tell myself that so long as I have my computer in it, it's still manly.

 

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keriflur
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Re: George Carlin's "stuff"

[ Edited ]

bobstro wrote:
In my (admittedly limited) experience, changing purses can be a traumatic experience. I know some people have one for different outfits and occasions, but I think most people like to have certain things in certain places. I can't think why women would vary from men in this regard. I know I hate changing computer bags.

 


I don't have this issue (which I know makes me unusual), mainly because I deliberately made an effort to get myself set up for swapping bags.  I keep lip balm and breath strips in everything I own, so I just move the keys-phone-wallet trio of necessities from bag to bag as needed.  Then I add in all the activity-specific stuff, which is all in it's own mini-bags (my mini-bags are usually zip-locks - zip lock of pens, zip-lock of candy, zip-lock of post-its, etc.), or if I'm going out to shoot, I just toss the keys-phone-wallet into the camera bag and head out.  My current favorite non-photo bags are the timbuk2 "11 MBA bag (effectively an XXS version of the laptop messenger) and the timbuk2 ipad bag (an even tinier version of the messenger), both of which work with thngs that aren't iproducts.

 

I generally don't bring a/c adapter and all that unless I'm flying, and if I do it goes into the overhead/checked bag (my big bag is well within the european overhead limits, so I can go either way).  I do carry a backup battery with various adapters when I fly, in case of delays.

 

FWIW, I can fit every non-living thing I care about except my bike in carry-on luggage.  I know most people like their stuff, their homes, etc. and it creeps people out that I can live indefinitely out of a backpack.  I guess, in that way, I never really grew up past college age.

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bobstro
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Re: George Carlin's "stuff"

keriflur wrote:
[...] FWIW, I can fit every non-living thing I care about except my bike in carry-on luggage.  I know most people like their stuff, their homes, etc. and it creeps people out that I can live indefinitely out of a backpack.  I guess, in that way, I never really grew up past college age.
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