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Distinguished Scribe
gb18
Posts: 820
Registered: ‎12-06-2010
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The first bookless library:

Inspired Scribe
kamas716
Posts: 1,480
Registered: ‎09-28-2011
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Re: The first bookless library:

I thought I read something about a California university building a bookless library a few years ago.
http://www.goodreads.com/kamas716
Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,784
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: The first bookless library:

I wonder what those "stripped down ereaders" are?

Distinguished Bibliophile
Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,396
Registered: ‎06-07-2011
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Re: The first bookless library:

I suspect it's likely a very locked down iPad since the rest of the hardware mentioned is all from Apple. 

 

I wonder how they would address the hacking issue, which I've read about in schools that provided students with iPads. 

 

I remember reading about this as a 'going to happen' story around, I think, May of this year.  A former co-worker tweeted me a link.  We made joke that it was the beginning of the end of an era.  Though one we had both foreseen as inevitable. 

 

We've discussed how ebooks are changing how we read, and if/when they will replace DTBs.  This article hits on one advantadge tablet ereaders have over traditional DTBs (and even 'enhanced' (for lack of a better term) DTBs that have audio built in.  The ability to teach reading at an adaptive level.  I think here you'll find the tablet ereader beats out the physical book.  I will admit I'm reading a lot in to what the article skims over fairly quickly, but I think it's ssomething already out there in the wild and something that will be improved upon. 

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,784
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: The first bookless library:

[ Edited ]

The article mentions "... a children's reader, which is enhanced with activities that help learn to read", but I'm not sure that it's an adaptive system. Is this library, in fact, providing an adaptive learning system? A tablet is a great way to deliver such lessons, but unless you spend the money on the actual adaptive learning software and administer the system, the lessons won't be tailored to the individual learner. Not to say that electronic reading programs aren't useful on their own, they're just not necessarily adaptive to individuals.

 

The other questions I have pertain to availability of books that aren't in ebook format. Can the library assist with traditional book titles in the interim, if indeed older books aren't available as ebooks? What about inter-library lending?

New User
MrGrantClarke
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎10-20-2013
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Re: The first bookless library:

Part of me wants to LOL at that photo of the bookless library. Call me old school. I "get it" though. It's like people who had furniture to hold their cds and records. Music to me is just air now. No furniture. More space for? Paintings, kids art, etc on the walls. Reality of making things digital is that before you could hold in hand, now you can't. To me though, a bookless library means no need to ever visit. I do find the story puzzling, complexing, depressing and funny all at the same time.

I'm new and happy to be here!
Wordsmith
doncr
Posts: 493
Registered: ‎12-29-2010
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Re: The first bookless library:

I actually popped into this place on Saturday.  It's adjacent to the local muni courthouse and comes complete with a constable roaming around inside.  Lots of nice equipment in there.  There were about a dozen people in there, mostly kids using the Macs.

 

I played around with an iPad and one of the Surface Tables in the Kid's Room, then browsed their catalog.  The iPads in the Kid's Room looked like the standard software running on retail devices to me.  Maybe the devices they loan are different?   I was only there for about 15 mins as the person I was with didn't share my interest of books and tech and wanted to get out of that neighborhood.