Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Distinguished Scribe
gb18
Posts: 820
Registered: ‎12-06-2010
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This would be different

Distinguished Bibliophile
patgolfneb
Posts: 1,759
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
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Re: This would be different

There are numerous scenarios one can put out there that can be logically supported.  Once you assign value most of them break down.  Separating the digital and bookstore divisions cripples BN in the long run and reduces brand value immediately. Why would Microsoft pay a billion for an immediately devalued brand? Creating an RT based product has some appeal.  Giving it enough uniqueness to make it viable at a competitive price would be a struggle. More importantly I believe that the tech reviewers, retailers and other manufacturers would not be supportive and might be actively hostile to such an offering. 

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: This would be different


gb18 wrote:

http://www.infoworld.com/t/microsoft-windows/deep-discounts-nook-tablets-may-have-windows-tie-in-220...


Although interesting, the article seems to be highly speculative and representative of the author's opinions more than anything else.  I guess we will have to wait and see what actually develops with the NOOK product line. 

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: This would be different


patgolfneb wrote:

There are numerous scenarios one can put out there that can be logically supported.  Once you assign value most of them break down.  Separating the digital and bookstore divisions cripples BN in the long run and reduces brand value immediately. Why would Microsoft pay a billion for an immediately devalued brand? Creating an RT based product has some appeal.  Giving it enough uniqueness to make it viable at a competitive price would be a struggle. More importantly I believe that the tech reviewers, retailers and other manufacturers would not be supportive and might be actively hostile to such an offering. 


I don't understand your reference to Microsoft paying a billion for an "immediately devalued brand."  Wasn't the actual amount paid by Microsoft a lot closer to $300 million? 

 

If a joint Microsoft/B&N product was introduced to replace the current NOOK product line, why would tech reviewers or retailers not be supportive?  If the product is an improvement over the products it replaces, and if prices are reasonable, why would anybody care? 

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,789
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: This would be different

[ Edited ]

The billion refers to the amount reported in the TechCrunch article. If articles are too long to read, you can try the search option. 

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Redcatlady
Posts: 260
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
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Re: This would be different


deesy58 wrote:

patgolfneb wrote:

There are numerous scenarios one can put out there that can be logically supported.  Once you assign value most of them break down.  Separating the digital and bookstore divisions cripples BN in the long run and reduces brand value immediately. Why would Microsoft pay a billion for an immediately devalued brand? Creating an RT based product has some appeal.  Giving it enough uniqueness to make it viable at a competitive price would be a struggle. More importantly I believe that the tech reviewers, retailers and other manufacturers would not be supportive and might be actively hostile to such an offering. 


I don't understand your reference to Microsoft paying a billion for an "immediately devalued brand."  Wasn't the actual amount paid by Microsoft a lot closer to $300 million? 

 

If a joint Microsoft/B&N product was introduced to replace the current NOOK product line, why would tech reviewers or retailers not be supportive?  If the product is an improvement over the products it replaces, and if prices are reasonable, why would anybody care? 


I know this has absolutely nothing to do with NOOK or anything like it, but if you want to do something really different (to paraphrase Monty Python), you could reinstate B&N University or at least give us Book Clubbers easier access to the site!  I'd post more if I could just be able to click on to B&N Community like I used to.

 

Redcatlady

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: This would be different


bobstro wrote:

The billion refers to the amount reported in the TechCrunch article. If articles are too long to read, you can try the search option. 


Well, ignoring the insulting tone of your clear attempt at trolling, I followed a link and read an article titled "Deep discounts on Nook tablets may have Windows tie-in" from INFOWORLD TECH WATCH.  In that article, the author informs us that "Microsoft announced it was buying a 17.6 percent share in the subsidiary for a cool $300 million."  The subsidiary specifically referred to is Nook Media.  He further related a report from Computerworld that "Microsoft has gotten little from a 2012 investment of $300 million with Barnes & Noble ..."  This amount ($300 million) is also substantiated by Barnes and Noble's FY 2013 Balance Sheet.  There have been no substantiated reports that Microsoft has made any additional purchases from Barnes and Noble, Inc. for any additional sums of money that I have seen.  Are there some new developments of which I am not aware?

 

The reference from TechCrunch is second-hand, at best, and is clearly speculation.  Furthermore, TechCrunch has not been around very long, is nothing more than a Web site, and hardly has a sterling reputation.  "In 2011, the [Web] site came under fire for possible ethics violations, leading to Arrington's [the founder's] departure."  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TechCrunch  

 

The statement that Microsoft might be willing to pay a billion dollars for Nook Media is no more than an unsubstantiated rumor, while the actual $300 million investment already made by Microsoft is a fact.  Even the source quoted by the author (Computerworld's Preston Gralla) indicated that he has seen no independent confirmation of any documents to support such an assertion. 

 

Have you looked at the type of reporting presented by TechCrunch?  Here are a few headlines from today's Web page:  "Health Trackers and Sexual Infidelity," "Why Do We Endlessly Retweet Tragedy?," "Top Apps For The 1%," and, of course, "College Humor's First Feature-Length Film Coming To iTunes And Other Digital Media Stores July 9."  This hardly sounds like hard news reporting, IMO.   

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,789
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: This would be different

[ Edited ]

I didn't comment on the veracity of either article. You seemed at a loss where the figure came from. If you open the link in the OP in your browser and search for the word "billion", you should be able to find it. It a long article, but the reference is there. 

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: This would be different

I believe you misunderstood my question.  If there has been no corroborated information regarding such a number, and if the Nook Media business might be worth substantially more than $1 billion, then the number is meaningless, and nobody should believe it. 

 

In addition, if 17.5% of Nook Media is worth $300 million, then wouldn't the remaining 82.5% be worth more than $1 billion?  Just asking. 

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,789
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: This would be different

So you did understand the reference?