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DeanGibson
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The world is not fair. Get over it.


flyingtoastr wrote:

I have a tough time paying for bailouts for the people who went for "marketable" banking degrees and royally screwed the world's economy 5 years ago.


First, if you go through life with a chip on your shoulder, blaming everyone else for everything, you are going to find a good job hard to get (let alone keep).  People here are trying to help you, and instead, you are lashing out.

 

Second, success doesn't come right way, except for a very few very lucky ones.

 

Third, I doubt that everyone who went for a banking degree screwed the world.

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5ivedom
Posts: 3,544
Registered: ‎12-03-2011
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Re: Website Complaint

This isn't true. This is your assumption.

 

*****

And unless you are wealthy enough to start your own bakery right out of culinary school, you may have to accept that your first handful of jobs are going to be making eclairs day after day, until you work your way up or find a backer for your dream.

*****

 

Lots and lots of people get their dream job and doing the things they love most in it. You just have to be proactive and fight for it.

Distinguished Bibliophile
patgolfneb
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
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Re: Website Complaint


flyingtoastr wrote:

doncr wrote:

 

What I have a problem with is someone that takes out huge student loans to get a degree in something that has no marketplace value.  It's a tough sell to ask me to pay for social programs to support someone who is $100K+ in debt who can't get a job with their BA in something lke Ethnic Women's Studies. 

 


I have a tough time paying for bailouts for the people who went for "markatable" banking degrees and royally screwed the world's economy 5 years ago.


One of lifes ironies. Farmers and ranchers comprise a large percentage of our most conservative groups politically. They tend to be highly critical of public assistance, corporate bailouts etc.  Per capita farmers and ranchers receive more federal assistance than any other group. This is the nature of todays political discussion, each segment sees benefits to them as necessary and needed, but tends to label benefits to other segments as bailouts, welfare, greed or socialism. We have substituted dearly held values for critical thinking when these discussions begin.  To me that is what education, especially liberal arts education offers, the ability to offer a way to look at things that is not entirely dependent on our personal history and world view.

Wordsmith
doncr
Posts: 493
Registered: ‎12-29-2010
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Re: Website Complaint


flyingtoastr wrote:

doncr wrote:

 

What I have a problem with is someone that takes out huge student loans to get a degree in something that has no marketplace value.  It's a tough sell to ask me to pay for social programs to support someone who is $100K+ in debt who can't get a job with their BA in something lke Ethnic Women's Studies. 

 


I have a tough time paying for bailouts for the people who went for "markatable" banking degrees and royally screwed the world's economy 5 years ago.


I do too, but at least they'll be able to pay back the loans we gave them.

From thehill.com...

 

While TARP is most often decried as a bailout to big banks, the portion of the  program that actually targeted financial institutions is reaping a windfall for  the government. After buying up $205 billion in stock from roughly 800 financial  institutions during the crisis, as well as throwing another $40 billion just at  bank titans Citigroup and Bank of America, the CBO estimates the government will  turn a $25 billion profit on that portion.

flyingtoastr
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Registered: ‎11-11-2009
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Read the post, Dean

[ Edited ]

DeanGibson wrote:

Third, I doubt that everyone who went for a banking degree screwed the world.


And I doubt everyone who gets a liberal arts degree needs welfare and assistance to survive, which is the comment I was responding to.

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,836
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Website Complaint


5ivedom wrote:

This isn't true. This is your assumption.

 

*****

And unless you are wealthy enough to start your own bakery right out of culinary school, you may have to accept that your first handful of jobs are going to be making eclairs day after day, until you work your way up or find a backer for your dream.

*****

 

Lots and lots of people get their dream job and doing the things they love most in it. You just have to be proactive and fight for it.


No, this is true.  See the words "unless you are wealthy enough" and "may"?  That means that there are exceptions, but the fact remains that MOST people will have to work for it.  Lots and lots of people do get their dream job, but for most, if not all, of those people, it's not their first job.  Working your way to that dream job is what's called "fighting for it".

Wordsmith
doncr
Posts: 493
Registered: ‎12-29-2010

Re: Read the post, Dean


flyingtoastr wrote:

DeanGibson wrote:

Third, I doubt that everyone who went for a banking degree screwed the world.


And I doubt everyone who gets a liberal arts degree needs welfare and assistance to survive, which is the comment I was responding to.


And I doubt that everyone who gets a liberal arts degreen needs welfare and assistance to survive either, so if you were responding to my comment you misunderstood my point.

I was referring to people who decide to take out large college loans in order to get a degree in an unmarketable field of study and then can't pay the loan back, can't get a job, and end up on welfare.

 

And just to be clear, I (as well as Dave Ramsey, from the link I posted) am more questioning of their parents that allowed this to happen than the decision of an 18 year old that has little life experience and want to "find themselves".

 

Inspired Scribe
kamas716
Posts: 1,511
Registered: ‎09-28-2011
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the changing nature of college and finances


doncr wrote:

Wow, I must be the odd man out then.  I knew what I wanted to do when I was 10 years old and have made a pretty good living doing it.  I put myself through college working construction jobs during the summer and retail during the school year.

 

I have no problem with young people spending some time to decide what they want to do with their life as long as they're paying for it.  Work part-time, take some community college courses, save your money, volunteer in your town and make up your mind.

 

What I have a problem with is someone that takes out huge student loans to get a degree in something that has no marketplace value.  It's a tough sell to ask me to pay for social programs to support someone who is $100K+ in debt who can't get a job with their BA in something lke Ethnic Women's Studies. 

 

 


Funny thing, my wife has known what she's wanted to since she was 8 (be an elementary school teacher).  And the first two years of our marriage were the two most miserable years of her life because she couldn't get a full time teaching position in the Fargo area.  I, on the other hand, switched my major in college from Civil Engineering to Anthropology and bounced from job to job for quite awhile.  I've been doing police dispatch now for 15 years at a couple of different agencies, but STILL don't know what I want to do for a career.  This just happens to be what I'm doing to pay the bills and I don't hate it (it's actually kinda fun sometimes).  My father has three degrees and hasn't used a single one in a professional manner outside of the Navy. 

 

Paying for college is very much a rich man's game these days.  When my father went to college, his out of pocket was less than $500/year, which he was able to pay by himself.  20 years later when my wife and I went, it was closer to $8K/year.  About 1/3 of mine was paid by my parents, 1/3 through scholarships/grants and 1/3 out of my pocket.  My wife's parents weren't able to pay for her education, so she had to pay for it all herself mostly through student loans.  After she finally got a local full time teaching position she got her Masters for which we had to take out more student loans.  My student loans were paid off before we met, her student loans won't likely be paid off until we retire.  I can't imagine the debt my daughter will incur should she decide to attend college.

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keriflur
Posts: 6,836
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: the changing nature of college and finances

The way the financial aid is configured is problematic also, with kids whose parents planned poorly qualifying for the most aid.  The system practically encourages parents not to set aside money for college unless they make enough to foot the whole bill.

DeanGibson
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Registered: ‎04-12-2011
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Re: The changing nature of college and finances


kamas716 wrote:

 

Paying for college is very much a rich man's game these days.


That's because the (especially) public universities have become bloated with administrators and staff.  Kinda like the government.  Oh, wait ...

 

A couple years ago, at a time of state funding cutbacks, some of the faculty complained about the athletic staff salaries.  We were told that the athletic program is entirely self-sustaining.  Sorta puts everything into perspective (like the relative importance of the academic and athletic programs).

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