Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Distinguished Bibliophile
patgolfneb
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Website Complaint

The supreme court did not rule that merchants could not be required to collect state and city sales taxes. It ruled that it was part of interstate commerce and the feds were responsible for regulating the process, leaving states no standing to pursue collection and enforcement. The feds passed speific law exempting internet purchases.. The reasoning was that the fledging internet needed the support. It has been extended repeatedly even though that is no longer justifiable. The feds are free to establish rules for collection and enforcement if they wish. That is why the simplified process I outlined is among the ideas being discussed.
Correspondent
Wulfraed
Posts: 1,024
Registered: ‎11-24-2012

Re: Website Complaint

POS registers are programmed with just the rate in effect at that store. Yes there may be many rates in some states varying by city, but the stores only have to have their local rate set.

 

They don't look up the billing address of a credit card user and set the rate for that customer. Only one rate for the store itself. If the rate changes, it is an overnight task to update the local POS terminals.

 

In short. For physical stores, tax is collected based on the location of the store, not the location the customer is from.

 

Baron Wulfraed
Inspired Scribe
kamas716
Posts: 1,497
Registered: ‎09-28-2011

Re: Website Complaint


Wulfraed wrote:

 

In short. For physical stores, tax is collected based on the location of the store, not the location the customer is from.

 


Personally, I think that's the way it should work for internet and mail order sales as well.  The customer should have to pay the tax where the seller is located.

http://www.goodreads.com/kamas716
Distinguished Bibliophile
patgolfneb
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎09-10-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Website Complaint

[ Edited ]

Kamas, that is great f you live in Amazons home town, but why should I pay taxes to Washington? I receive no benefit from the majority of services taxes pay for there. The sellers home already benefit from the jobs, property, corporate and personal income taxes etc. Plus I can't vote there. To do it your way is patently unfair.

Bibliophile
5ivedom
Posts: 3,544
Registered: ‎12-03-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Website Complaint

PatgolfNeb, I agree it should go to the state.

 

Kamas, there's a lot riding on how much states take in in tax revenue. It would disbalance things (not that the State Governments need help with that) if it became based on state of the seller.

 

*******

 

Wulfraed, your comment reminds me of what I read about the person/company who first started selling registers.

 

They had to make the Registers super durable because

 

A) Other Cash Register makers would tamper with them to make them look bad.

 

B) The cashiers themselves would tamper with things.

 

Initially, store owners didn't want cash registers (didn't see any benefit) and cashiers and clerks absolutely hated the idea.

 

Very soon, store owners realized how good Cash Registers were at catching people who steal and other reasons.

 

There was also a really good sales force. I forget the name of the company. The book the founder wrote is considered one of the best books ever written on sales.

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,945
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
0 Kudos

Re: Website Complaint

How do companies that take phone orders handle sales tax?

 

5ivedom, I believe you're describing National Cash Register (NCR). We had some of their PCs back in the day.

Bibliophile
bklvr896
Posts: 4,814
Registered: ‎12-31-2009

Re: Website Complaint


bobstro wrote:

How do companies that take phone orders handle sales tax?

 

5ivedom, I believe you're describing National Cash Register (NCR). We had some of their PCs back in the day.


I believe the same way as internet sales.  If they are required to charge sales tax in a state, they charge it.  It's based on where the seller lives.

 

It's interesting, in CA, in a store you pay tax based on where the store is, when counties/cities have different taxes.  But when you buy a car, regardless of where the dealer is, you pay tax based on where you live.  So you can't go to a county that a smaller tax rate and buy the car hoping to avoid some tax, the dealer will calculate it based on where you live.

 

And if you buy a used car, you have to pay the sales tax when you register it.  Seems quite unfair to pay sales tax on a used item, the state already got the sales tax the first time.

Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012

Re: Website Complaint


flyingtoastr wrote:

TaustinOC wrote:

That is the reason why the Supreme Court rules - decades ago, when mail order catalogs were big - that merchants couldn't be held accountable for collecting income taxes in other states. I'm not sure where Congress gets the idea that they have the authority to implement such a scheme. They don't. If they can get all states to agree on a single tax rate, everywhere (as in, no more county and local tax districts) - they won't - they might get past the inevitable challenge. As it is, good luck.


Interstate commerce clause.

 

They very much do have the right to intervene. If it crosses state lines, the feds have the right to set the law.


Does this mean that you believe that a majority of Republicans in the US Senate and House of Representatives are prepared to establish and implement a new tax?  This would amount to a National Sales Tax, wouldn't it?  Who would vote for such a tax?

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,771
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Website Complaint


kamas716 wrote:

Wulfraed wrote:

 

In short. For physical stores, tax is collected based on the location of the store, not the location the customer is from.

 


Personally, I think that's the way it should work for internet and mail order sales as well.  The customer should have to pay the tax where the seller is located.


 I love this idea!  We have no income tax here in WA, so the state makes all their money on sales tax.  In Seattle, the rate is 9.5%.  I'd be great if all the Amazon shoppers pitched in. We might have decent public transportation if that happened.

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,771
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Website Complaint


deesy58 wrote:

flyingtoastr wrote:

TaustinOC wrote:

That is the reason why the Supreme Court rules - decades ago, when mail order catalogs were big - that merchants couldn't be held accountable for collecting income taxes in other states. I'm not sure where Congress gets the idea that they have the authority to implement such a scheme. They don't. If they can get all states to agree on a single tax rate, everywhere (as in, no more county and local tax districts) - they won't - they might get past the inevitable challenge. As it is, good luck.


Interstate commerce clause.

 

They very much do have the right to intervene. If it crosses state lines, the feds have the right to set the law.


Does this mean that you believe that a majority of Republicans in the US Senate and House of Representatives are prepared to establish and implement a new tax?  This would amount to a National Sales Tax, wouldn't it?  Who would vote for such a tax?

 


Have you met our congress? Clearly they can be bought.