Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,625
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO

Who has an MBA is not relevant to the discussion of Lynch leaving and what the impact of that might be.

 

This, however, is somewhat relevant:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/10/business/fork-in-the-road-for-a-bookseller.html?_r=0

 

The NYT has posted a review of Lynch's strategies with the nook has posits that the decision to get into the tablet biz is what has steered B&N wrong (I don't completely agree, but I see their point).  They've also speculated on Riggio's love of the stores and what that means.

Wordsmith
TnTexas
Posts: 884
Registered: ‎10-22-2011

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO

keriflur: The NYT has posted a review of Lynch's strategies with the nook has posits that the decision to get into the tablet biz is what has steered B&N wrong (I don't completely agree, but I see their point).

 

I don't think their initial decision was a bad one out of the starting gate. I think they took some definite wrong turns after that, but their initial decision had some potential.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,395
Registered: ‎06-07-2011
0 Kudos

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO


TnTexas wrote:

keriflur: The NYT has posted a review of Lynch's strategies with the nook has posits that the decision to get into the tablet biz is what has steered B&N wrong (I don't completely agree, but I see their point).

 

I don't think their initial decision was a bad one out of the starting gate. I think they took some definite wrong turns after that, but their initial decision had some potential.


 

I think this may be what the experts mentioned were talking about.  We've discussed the NC being the tablet that really got the affordable 7" tablet market going.  It was good hardware at a good price.  The problem was software and the lack thereof.  This wasn't helped with the limited app store and the various issues developers had with B&N early on.  Those issues were dealt with, but perhaps not quickly enough.  The NT was more of the same, good hardware but the device was locked down. 

 

It's no secret I am not a fan of the LCD Nooks myself, that's not to say I don't think they're good products, but I think they distracted B&N from what they should have focused on.  And hopefully they can now turn back to the eink devices and make improvements with them that will make an already good device a great one.

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,625
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO


TnTexas wrote:

keriflur: The NYT has posted a review of Lynch's strategies with the nook has posits that the decision to get into the tablet biz is what has steered B&N wrong (I don't completely agree, but I see their point).

 

I don't think their initial decision was a bad one out of the starting gate. I think they took some definite wrong turns after that, but their initial decision had some potential.


I think so also. The NC was a game changer in the tablet world and paved the way for affordable 7-inch tablets. I'm sure that, because it was unique at the time, it brought in a lot of customers, many of which are likely still customers.

Distinguished Correspondent
sparky_80
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎06-30-2012

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO


keriflur wrote:

I think so also. The NC was a game changer in the tablet world and paved the way for affordable 7-inch tablets. I'm sure that, because it was unique at the time, it brought in a lot of customers, many of which are likely still customers.


Agree about the game changer part.

 

I wonder if many are still customers...especially the early adopters.  I was very happy with my NC, especially after I rooted it.  But when it came time for a hardware refresh, there were so many options out there.  

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,395
Registered: ‎06-07-2011
0 Kudos

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO


sparky_80 wrote:

keriflur wrote:

I think so also. The NC was a game changer in the tablet world and paved the way for affordable 7-inch tablets. I'm sure that, because it was unique at the time, it brought in a lot of customers, many of which are likely still customers.


Agree about the game changer part.

 

I wonder if many are still customers...especially the early adopters.  I was very happy with my NC, especially after I rooted it.  But when it came time for a hardware refresh, there were so many options out there.  

 

 


 

Consider that the first Nook was released in 2009, I still have customers come in with that device.  Yes it's a less common thing now, but the first Nook compared to any of the Nooks that followed leaves the N1E in the dust save for 3G and (when compared to the NST/G) the ability to have audio/games/web, though all three features were lack luster on the N1E especially the web browser which I believe never really made it out of beta quality.

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,625
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
0 Kudos

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO


sparky_80 wrote:

keriflur wrote:

I think so also. The NC was a game changer in the tablet world and paved the way for affordable 7-inch tablets. I'm sure that, because it was unique at the time, it brought in a lot of customers, many of which are likely still customers.


Agree about the game changer part.

 

I wonder if many are still customers...especially the early adopters.  I was very happy with my NC, especially after I rooted it.  But when it came time for a hardware refresh, there were so many options out there.  

 

 


I don't know how many are still buying nooks, but I'd bet a lot of them are still buying nook books, even if they're reading them on the nook app on some other device.

Distinguished Scribe
gb18
Posts: 819
Registered: ‎12-06-2010
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Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,625
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO


gb18 wrote:

http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/breakout/board-room-thriller-barnes-noble-killing-nook-save-135630059...


"Barnes & Noble (BKS) took actions that just might make it possible for a generation of readers to have the experience of shopping in a real live brick and mortar bookstore."

 

Um, delusional much?  The store are there now.  Does Macke (or, forbid, B&N) actually believe that if the choice becomes "shop at a brick and mortar or don't buy from B&N" that more people will go to the store?

 

"Riggio is an old-school merchant who has long been disdainful of the company's move into a digital service. Not only has his view been exonerated..."

 

No again.  The move into a digital service wasn't a bad idea.  Only half implementing it was.

 

"If Riggio can get rid of Nook at anything other than a huge additional loss BKS shares should trade higher than where they are right now."

 

This is only true if the market drivers are wearing blinders and can't see the future.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,395
Registered: ‎06-07-2011
0 Kudos

Re: William Lynch out as B&N CEO

Hmm, interesting that he asserts B&N can't do anything for the retail space should ebooks sales eclipse those of DTB sales.  Odd that many forum posters have commented that their local B&Ns have already started to do just that very thing.

 

The stores just 5 years ago were dominated by books with small gift sections.  Now most of the stores have a toys and games section (which in comparison to 5 years ago did not exist), the gift sections of most stores have also expanded, granted at a slower rate than the toys and games. 

 

I also liked the bit about B&N putting out 4,000 digital titles a week.  Sure if books were directly comparable to MP3s this would be "killing themselves".  However books don't require an electronic device to read them the way music did when MP3s came about.  The MP3 player replaced the discman, because it directly improved everything the discman offered.  Larger storage, less skipping, customizable playlists, and smaller physical footprint.  Once prices on the players came down it just didn't make sense to buy a discman.  Further you could fairly easily convert a music CD you purchased to MP3s.  In some cases the software used would need to get around copyprotection, but that was a fairly trivial thing, and I'd be surprised if anyone was brought up on charges and successfully convicted for merely duplicating a legally owned CD. 

 

The same is not true of books and ereaders.  Yes ereaders offer some advantadges, I love my NSTG, however a book doesn't require a battery.  And while you can convert a printed book to an ebook the process is a lot more demanding than converting a CD to an MP3, and once the conversion is done you've still got to go in and check for OCR errors, create a TOC, etc.  It's become easier to make ebooks, but no where near as easy as MP3s. 

 

Add to that that there are readers young and old who don't want to convert to digital.  I'm sure eventually they wont have a choice, but that's 'eventually' and likely not for a good number of years.

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.