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Distinguished Correspondent
auntykatkat
Posts: 114
Registered: ‎02-23-2010
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Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a

I agree with a few of you but I also think that we are all getting swindled.

 

I am an avid reader and spend more money than I sometimes should on what I read. What I take out of the article is that since we are only buying rights to access the book the price should not be that high. Basically the publishers are like Netflix. If they go and decided that we, the consumers should have to pay to access a book over 26 times like the library, we might have to do so. Or that we only have access to read it for a year. If you want to re-read it, give them 15.99 again to do so.We have no say. Penguin has even stated it this past week. They can change the rules any time they want.

 

This is my biggest complaint, even if I purchase digital music I can make back up copy. Ebooks, not so much. I am worried about the Dorchester titles in my library. Even though I paid the same price as a paperback, I do not have the same rights as if I purchased one. It seems that even though I paid for them, the author might not have been.  I love my authors and want them to keep writing but I see them getting hurt more in this struggle. It seems that they are more likely to get cheated from their publishers all in the name of greed.  They have set the prices high for them; not the authors.,

 

So we the consumer, try to use our libraries. They sell these devices, telling us that we can download our library books on our device. Since the prices are so high, people want to use the public library. But,we cannot find the book we want because.... It is published by one of the four that do not sell eBooks to the libraries. Or the other 2 that do, either have restrictions on how many times it can be read or are raising their prices that the libraries may, or may not be able to pay. Authors are then not getting their work out to readers. If they can't get readers, then they don't  get to write anymore. IMHO

 

 

Auntykatkat

Distinguished Scribe
Ya_Ya
Posts: 3,334
Registered: ‎09-29-2010
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Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a


auntykatkat wrote:

 

This is my biggest complaint, even if I purchase digital music I can make back up copy. Ebooks, not so much. I am worried about the Dorchester titles in my library. 


Um, yes you can.

 

Download them out onto your computer, save them on a thumbddrive, put them in your dropbox, upload them to your Carbonite.  At any time, if  booksellers go out of business (or a publisher yanks a book) you'll still have all of our books on your hard drive which you can then transfer back to your ereader.

 

You make some valid points, but telling untruths doesn't strengthen your position.

Distinguished Correspondent
Reisnice
Posts: 122
Registered: ‎11-20-2011
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Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&q

Well, you should worry about your ebooks! Yes, you can make backup copies all you want, but you're relying on your friendly ereader vendors to allow you to be able to read them. What if the next version of epub isn't backwards compatible? What if Adobe decides to drop the product? Eventually BN and even Kobo will upgrade or change to something else, and once nothing will read old epubs, you have a bunch of useless files. I realize that you can possibly maintain some antiquated software to prolong the inevitable, but it's still not as easy as going down in your basement and finding a book you hadn't read in 40 years. I rarely buy an ebook with DRM that i expect to care about after a year or two. My non-DRM ones are better as long as we can keep Calibre in business. Otherwise, I still buy paper books and CDs or DVDs. (While I still can...)
Inspired Bibliophile
deesy58
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a


Fred011 wrote:

deesy58 wrote:






Although it is generally true that prices are usually determined by market forces, there is one direct relationship between price and cost that is irrefutable:  If a company continuously sells its products at a price that is lower than its cost, it will not remain in business.  :smileysurprised:


Unless, of course, the Government comes along and bails it out!:smileyvery-happy:


Good point.  :smileylol:

Distinguished Correspondent
auntykatkat
Posts: 114
Registered: ‎02-23-2010
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Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a

You make some valid points, but telling untruths doesn't strengthen your position.

 

Well, I am sorry but I didn't state it correctly and usually any DRM  discussion goes crazy. I have tried several of your ways to backup some of my earlier eBooks but the DRM was tied to my computer and when I upgraded, I lost them. I guess I should have remembered what the other computer was named. A whole bunch of lit files that I have saved but won't open, but I bought them and now have no access to them. It was not an "untruth" to me.   
 

Auntykatkat

Wordsmith
Fred011
Posts: 212
Registered: ‎02-18-2012

Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a


auntykatkat wrote:

You make some valid points, but telling untruths doesn't strengthen your position.

 

Well, I am sorry but I didn't state it correctly and usually any DRM  discussion goes crazy. I have tried several of your ways to backup some of my earlier eBooks but the DRM was tied to my computer and when I upgraded, I lost them. I guess I should have remembered what the other computer was named. A whole bunch of lit files that I have saved but won't open, but I bought them and now have no access to them. It was not an "untruth" to me.   
 

Auntykatkat


Auntyketkat,

 

I've been following this thread and I have to say that I wholeheartedly agree with you regarding "untruths".  The use of the term "untruths" was misguided at best: if you know something not to be true it is a lie or "untruth" (not a very subtle euphemism used in this case) if you believe it to be true it falls into a totally different category.  What you said was true and accurate as far as you were aware.  What you said might have been factually inaccurate, incorrect or just plain wrong, but to call it an "untruth" was unnecessary.

Frequent Contributor
KD67
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎10-12-2010
0 Kudos

Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a


auntykatkat wrote:

I agree with a few of you but I also think that we are all getting swindled.

 

I am an avid reader and spend more money than I sometimes should on what I read. What I take out of the article is that since we are only buying rights to access the book the price should not be that high. Basically the publishers are like Netflix. If they go and decided that we, the consumers should have to pay to access a book over 26 times like the library, we might have to do so. Or that we only have access to read it for a year. If you want to re-read it, give them 15.99 again to do so.We have no say. Penguin has even stated it this past week. They can change the rules any time they want.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I am an avid reader also and I for one simply refuse to pay the high prices currently being set for most ebooks. Example: the latest and last book in the Star Wars Fate of the Jedi series comes out tomorrow and although I would love to read it, it won't be happening anytime soon. The reason? The ebook is priced at 13.99 and I will NOT pay that high a price ever for any ebook. I will either wait until the price drops below 9.99 or I won't read it at all. (Unless I get a copy from the library, Hardback) Also if publishers start demanding that we have to repurchase the right to read an ebook that we already purchased the right to read, then I will no longer purchase any books whether ebook or DTB from that publisher ever again. Not everyone will agree with me nor will they stop buy books because of the price, but seeing as between my wife and I we purchase a dozen or more books each month, that is a lot of capital that publishers will lose or are losing due to their pricing practices.

 


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,552
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
0 Kudos

Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a


Reisnice wrote:
Well, you should worry about your ebooks! Yes, you can make backup copies all you want, but you're relying on your friendly ereader vendors to allow you to be able to read them. What if the next version of epub isn't backwards compatible? What if Adobe decides to drop the product? Eventually BN and even Kobo will upgrade or change to something else, and once nothing will read old epubs, you have a bunch of useless files. I realize that you can possibly maintain some antiquated software to prolong the inevitable, but it's still not as easy as going down in your basement and finding a book you hadn't read in 40 years. I rarely buy an ebook with DRM that i expect to care about after a year or two. My non-DRM ones are better as long as we can keep Calibre in business. Otherwise, I still buy paper books and CDs or DVDs. (While I still can...)

The option exists to strip the DRM from the file so that you can convert the file to the "new" format.  Strippiing DRM fo personal use is currently of questionable legality (the DCMA makes this illegal, but the provision is expired, if I remember correctly, so it may or may not be deemed illegal at this time), but is easy to do with the Calibre application and the appropriate plug-in.

Bibliophile
bklvr896
Posts: 4,801
Registered: ‎12-31-2009

Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a


auntykatkat wrote:

I agree with a few of you but I also think that we are all getting swindled.

 

 

 

Auntykatkat



You can't be being swindled since to be swindled someone must beusing deception or untruths to deprive you of your money or possessions or obtain the money fraudulently.  Neither of which is happening.  

 

No one is deceiving anyone, you know exactly what the cost of the eBook is when you purchase.  You can choose to buy it or not.  Sellers, be it the publisher or the retailer are going to try and make as much money as they can, that's the society we live in, and if you owned stock in any of the publishers or retailers, you'd want them to make as much money as possible.  Since the prices are staying where they are or, going higher, one has to assume the publishers are happy with the volumen of sales.

 

If you don't like the prices, don't buy the eBooks, go back to printed books.  If I spent all my time upset about the prices and worrying about the prices, it would ruin my reading enjoyment.  So, at whatever price the eBook is being sold for, I either decide I'm willing to pay that amount and I buy the book or I'm not and I don't buy it and move on.  Same thing I did before eBooks, I either was willing to buy the HC or I waited for the paperback.:smileyhappy:

Inspired Contributor
robertVA
Posts: 212
Registered: ‎07-19-2011
0 Kudos

Re: "When you buy an e-book, you're buying the right to access the book, not the book itself.&a


gb18 wrote
(snipped quotes from other contributors)
Who is John Galt?

Interesting use of a quote from a eBook novel that costs about 25% more than the regular size paperback. Especially since the novel was first published about 55 years ago