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Paul_Hochman
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Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

At the very least, this should prove to be one interesting interview!
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bentley
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th


PaulH wrote:
At the very least, this should prove to be one interesting interview!




Well I saw the interview and I was disappointed. McCarthy looked better than Winfrey. He looked trim and fit and in pretty good shape for his age. Oprah looked giddy, a little nervous and very tired. I think it was one of the worst interviews she has given. There was not much about the book per se (none of our questions were answered). She spent more time asking him inane questions about his life and being poor and not wanting to work versus about the book itself. In fact, one question about something his second wife said (a story we all heard before about the turned down $2000 interview when they had no food) seemed to anger him at some level and he squinted up his eyes a little bit, but recovered well.

McCarthy came across as a quiet, not too quick on the uptake sort of fellow who didn't care what anyone thought of him. He did say his son had a profound impact on him because of his time in life and he appreciated him more and he made everything fresh. You could see how much he loved his little son by the language he used. The genesis for the book came in El Paso, Texas no less and then McCarthy realized that it could really be a book when he went to Ireland.

His not liking to work came across loud and clear, but I did not learn much of anything about The Road itself aside from the above. He said it was really a story of a father and son and their love for each other.

A lot of folks thought the interview was terrific; I guess because McCarthy has never given an interview that seeing him in front of a camera, any camera was a real treat. He did not like looking at the camera and didn't and was slouched down in the chair for most of the interview.

Would be interested to see what others thought. I didn't get much out of it which I did not know already. One word sums it up for me: disappointing.

Bentley
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Wrighty
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

I wasn't very impressed either. I just finished the book yesterday and have been reading the posts here. I wish I had gotten it in time to join the discussion. I was looking forward to watching Oprah and hopefully getting some more insight into the story. She said a couple of things before they aired the interview that made me think it may not be as good as I hoped. She mentioned that when she called him he wasn't sure if he would give an interview so she said she would call back in exactly two days to get his answer. He told her yes so she hopped on a plane quickly before he could change his mind. She also said that she would only interview him for one hour because she knew he was uncomfortable. And when I saw that there wouldn't be any other guests there, just the two of them, I had my doubts. That must have been one tough interview.
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bentley
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th



Wrighty wrote:
I wasn't very impressed either. I just finished the book yesterday and have been reading the posts here. I wish I had gotten it in time to join the discussion. I was looking forward to watching Oprah and hopefully getting some more insight into the story. She said a couple of things before they aired the interview that made me think it may not be as good as I hoped. She mentioned that when she called him he wasn't sure if he would give an interview so she said she would call back in exactly two days to get his answer. He told her yes so she hopped on a plane quickly before he could change his mind. She also said that she would only interview him for one hour because she knew he was uncomfortable. And when I saw that there wouldn't be any other guests there, just the two of them, I had my doubts. That must have been one tough interview.




Yes, I agree with you. I got a lot out of watching the interview segments on the Oprah site. They had more there and there seemed to be more continuity. Heavy editing I think for the TV segment today. A strange quiet fellow who is obviously brilliant and fascinating; but unfortunately not a lot of questions answered. Good segment on his punctuation style and why. I would watch the videos if you get a chance. But getting a opportunity to see him on TV was an experience...my expectations were obviously set too high.
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

Alas, I haven't seen it yet, but I'll check out Oprah's site in the meantime.

Bentley: That question about him turning down money has come up before. I also seem to remember his ex-wife saying that they had to bath in a lake in those days.
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

I just watched the four or five segments on Oprah's site, and I really thought they were terrific. For a guy who has shun any sort of publicity, he was pretty forthcoming in my opinion. His thoughts on life and how we should appreciate it more were touching.

Did anyone else catch that he said the idea for The Road came to him in El Paso? He was looking out the window of the old hotel and he envisioned the hills on fire. I guess we'll have to rethink the location of the novel now :smileyhappy:

I also think El Paso is interesting in that Cities of the Plains -- the final novel in his Border Trilogy -- takes place there. One could almost imagine an elderly Billy Parham looking out that same hotel window.
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bentley
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th


PaulH wrote:
I just watched the four or five segments on Oprah's site, and I really thought they were terrific. For a guy who has shun any sort of publicity, he was pretty forthcoming in my opinion. His thoughts on life and how we should appreciate it more were touching.

Did anyone else catch that he said the idea for The Road came to him in El Paso? He was looking out the window of the old hotel and he envisioned the hills on fire. I guess we'll have to rethink the location of the novel now :smileyhappy:

I also think El Paso is interesting in that Cities of the Plains -- the final novel in his Border Trilogy -- takes place there. One could almost imagine an elderly Billy Parham looking out that same hotel window.




PaulH, the Oprah ones (on her site) were better and not as heavily edited. Yes, I did catch that. I have taken some detailed notes of the five (5) interviews. He put notes about his musings at 2 to 3 AM in the morning in a notebook (while his boy slept) and then four years later when he was in Ireland decided that this could be and was a book. He just said that the book was about a father and son on the road and their love for each other. He also said that without his son, there would have been no book; that he really co-authored the book. As far as location, how far away could you be from Tennessee? (smile). I still felt that I was disappointed. I think that the feelings about his son were very genuine and he even blushed when asked if this was a love song or tribute to his son; he is certainly enamored with this boy. Doesn't know what he believes in as far as God goes; it depends on the day he says but you should pray even if you do not know who you are praying to. Oprah was the most nervous I have ever seen her in an interview. I don't know...a lot of the questions she asked really were done by others so many times before in older interviews. More about the book could have been asked I think; guess we will really never know the significance of the number 1:17 and why it shows up in other books of his. Interesting that he does not consider himself as a believer of God. I think he vacillates on this; almost an agnostic in a way. And there were so many questions on the wife in the novel..well I do not think there is going to be another TV interview with him.

At least, he was seen in the flesh, discussing the philosophical views that we have seen in print and the folklore about the man was confirmed.
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bentley
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

[ Edited ]

PaulH wrote:
Alas, I haven't seen it yet, but I'll check out Oprah's site in the meantime.

Bentley: That question about him turning down money has come up before. I also seem to remember his ex-wife saying that they had to bath in a lake in those days.




Yes, it did. It was obvious that he wondered where Oprah was going with this line of questioning and I don't think he was really too happy with this particular ex wife. She (his ex wife) also said in that same interview that they had to bath in a lake. Doesn't she own or did own a restaurant somewhere..in Florida maybe. Can't remember for sure. There were some anecdotes which reminded me of Suttree (he was thrown out of a $40 a month hotel)and didn't have any money at all when he was housesitting. Even his toothpaste was gone one time but he considered himself very lucky. And then lo and behold there was a free sample in the mailbox. He always believed that he would be provided for and he always was. Funny for a man who says that he is not sure that he believes in God. I think the book was an encapsulation of the reflections of an older man who loves his young son more than himself and senses that he himself is getting on it years but wants the best for the boy even if some day he passes on. (The Road exactly) This may be McCarthy's legacy. Aside from seeing him on TV and in the flesh confirming what we knew and/or read about him, there wasn't a lot about the book itself except for the El Paso segment and the fact that the book was a simple one (love of father and son).

My expectations were very high.

Message Edited by bentley on 06-06-2007 11:17 AM
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

You're right, Bentley. You can certainly see the resemblance to 'Ol Sut in McCarthy. He was drawing on his own experiences. I'm glad he mentioned New Orleans, as there's been rumors of a big N.O. novel that's been in the works for years. Maybe we'll one day see it in print!

While I too would have liked more clarification (i.e. 1:17), McCarthy like most writers probably likes to leave things up for interpretation.

Did you note when he was talking about getting that $20,000 check out of the blue from that little known grant? He said something to the effect that it was from old Coca-cola money. If you remember in The Road, a can of coke was just about the only named product in the book. Could that have been a sly nod to his once benefactors?
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

I saw the interview yesterday and I was disappointed that Cormac didn't talk more about the book. But one thing stuck in my mind that he said towards the end was that what people should get out of this book if they have read it and that is to be grateful for what you have and be appreciative of every day you live on this Earth. I thought he was an odd sort of person, one of simple pleasures and wanting only food and shoes to get by in life. He doesn't care if people read his book or not, fame doesn't seem to matter and maybe that is why he doesn't grant many interviews. The book is an interesting concept especially in light of 9/11 and to me, it sends an ominous warning about what could happen in the future as the way Cormac saw it one night. That was how he got the concept for the book. The book made me sit back and really contemplate about not only nuclear war but also global warming. We are trashing this planet and someday, some country is really going to start something and send a destructive nuclear warhead our way. We have to think about these things and Cormac has given us the opportunity and now it's up to us and the world as to whether we will survive or not.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th


PaulH wrote:
Alas, I haven't seen it yet, but I'll check out Oprah's site in the meantime.

Bentley: That question about him turning down money has come up before. I also seem to remember his ex-wife saying that they had to bath in a lake in those days.


If you read the segments on Oprah's site, that was the interview, so not to worry.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th


PaulH wrote:
I just watched the four or five segments on Oprah's site, and I really thought they were terrific. For a guy who has shun any sort of publicity, he was pretty forthcoming in my opinion. His thoughts on life and how we should appreciate it more were touching.

Did anyone else catch that he said the idea for The Road came to him in El Paso? He was looking out the window of the old hotel and he envisioned the hills on fire. I guess we'll have to rethink the location of the novel now :smileyhappy:

I also think El Paso is interesting in that Cities of the Plains -- the final novel in his Border Trilogy -- takes place there. One could almost imagine an elderly Billy Parham looking out that same hotel window.




I thought the interview was interesting but I was just disappointed because I wanted to hear more about the book. I think he is a fascinating man and it must be very hard to interview someone who is so private and doesn't really want to share about himself. I can understand why Oprah would be nervous about that one. I thought it was really interesting when he said he didn't know any other authors. His circle of friends are all scientist and that's who he enjoys talking to. There was also a comment he made about how he doesn't love to write but he likes his work - something to that effect but I'm sure I have his wording totally wrong. Does anyone else remember that part?
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

It surprises me that you guys really thought he was going to "explain" the books or parts of the book. Why? It might actually make the book much less in a person's mind than the wonderful book it is now. I was really glad I read it before the interview, so that I had my ideas, my own feelings about it first and it was overpowering. If Oprah seemed nervous, look, she had to rush out there, had one hour with a man who might get up and walk at any minute. I do have a feeling she did ask, ok what catastrophe happened, people want to know, and what was this or that and I think he probably shrugged it off, so she was trying to get ideas about the man, that might give insight to the book and if you listen some, she did.

There were times in our discussion in here, that I got frustrated because I read the book and it was great without everything having to mean more than exactly what it said. It was like, everyone was searching for some hidden "deeper" meaning behind every single thing that happened, EVERYTHING, when there was such deep meaning right there anyway. I remember saying on one thread, I dont remember what about now, but something to the effect... and maybe it was just that, just what they were doing as father and son at the moment with no bigger greater meaning
.
The interesting thing is in the interview, through two questions Oprah asks, he kinda says just that, "oh I think its a pretty straight forward book, its where the story went" thats actually a paraphrase and he did say he didnt have some grand "God" message in it, but that people could draw from it what they will. THATS what made it so great to us, what we felt ourselves at the end. I dont often hear about men crying over books, but i heard it about this one. If everything was explained away, or if those feelings were taken away by meaning something different than how you felt it, it would not be the book it is.

Also the talk about him being completely poor at times DID give you some insight if you thought about what he said. It wasnt just "stuff" to talk about when all else failed. Two or three times he said...but it was then, in those bleakest times, that something always seemed to come through, i always have a feeling in those times, something would take care of me. He said it might have been naive, but during "those bleakest" times, something did appear, like the toothpaste. I felt he said it several times almost in a way of answering one question we all had and that was, along this road where everything is dead or dying, how do they manage to always find something to eat. I think his belief about his own place, tells you why he was able to write it that way. It was his own personal belief there would be something there.

I had thought the boy in this, in the first part was between 6-8 by the talk and didnt he say thats how old his son was then? I think so anyway.

His message he said was to just be grateful for what we have today, to not take things or people for granted. You know he truly loved his son, and at this age to have a son that young, this was the perfect time in his life to right such a wonderful story about a father and son, "in the bleakest of times". He looked at what he saw in his mind as devastated El Paso and looked at his son and later realised, this is a book. This is a shy brilliant man, who hangs out with scientist and writes about a man and his son in a world that he could learn about from these scientist and what would it be like. His love definately comes through in the book and caring for others.

There are many things in the book that can be symbolic, but let them be symbolic to whatever touched you inside, in your way. We debated what is, about this book so much it nearly took the wonder out of it for me, instead of looking for the wonder in us, if somthing like this happened to us. Sure its got spiritual meaning in it,for each of us but also because its written in a way that he lets you know he does believe in something greater than just us but thats up to us to figure out. If its possible to do this now with a fresh mind, not looking to analyze everything that is said in the book, go back and read it again now, for the story that it is, just read and feel, and see if its different. Now, frankly, after reading the club posts and discussing it some (I came into it the second month) I am very glad i read it all before participating because what I got from it personally was so much more than the constant barrage of "what if it means this, what if it means that" about every well turned phrase in the book! In the end for me it wasnt about ecking out every single thing it MUST have meant, it was about what it meant to "me" and what i came away feeling as "me" that I couldnt shake for a long time.

Yes I would have liked to hear more about some parts of it, but you could tell just listening to the few short answers he gave about the book or writing it, that he wasnt going to go there. I dont think even Oprah could have drug it out of him lol so I dont knock her interview, she was probably hoping for more too but could only go where he would let her but still, if you listen, it was enough.
Vivian
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bentley
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th



PaulH wrote:
You're right, Bentley. You can certainly see the resemblance to 'Ol Sut in McCarthy. He was drawing on his own experiences. I'm glad he mentioned New Orleans, as there's been rumors of a big N.O. novel that's been in the works for years. Maybe we'll one day see it in print!

While I too would have liked more clarification (i.e. 1:17), McCarthy like most writers probably likes to leave things up for interpretation.

Did you note when he was talking about getting that $20,000 check out of the blue from that little known grant? He said something to the effect that it was from old Coca-cola money. If you remember in The Road, a can of coke was just about the only named product in the book. Could that have been a sly nod to his once benefactors?




That is right..I remember that now...it is funny how he goes off on tangents. The luck and money segment showed that in spades. It just may have been! ..it certainly helped him out when everything looked bleak. Good for him for thanking those who helped him. Even if it was a sly nod. He seems to like New Orleans and another novel would be great. I think you were the one who also said that he actually has multiple books being throught through and written in parallel for years..hence some of the similarities in symbolism and images.
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bentley
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th



maxcat wrote:
I saw the interview yesterday and I was disappointed that Cormac didn't talk more about the book. But one thing stuck in my mind that he said towards the end was that what people should get out of this book if they have read it and that is to be grateful for what you have and be appreciative of every day you live on this Earth. I thought he was an odd sort of person, one of simple pleasures and wanting only food and shoes to get by in life. He doesn't care if people read his book or not, fame doesn't seem to matter and maybe that is why he doesn't grant many interviews. The book is an interesting concept especially in light of 9/11 and to me, it sends an ominous warning about what could happen in the future as the way Cormac saw it one night. That was how he got the concept for the book. The book made me sit back and really contemplate about not only nuclear war but also global warming. We are trashing this planet and someday, some country is really going to start something and send a destructive nuclear warhead our way. We have to think about these things and Cormac has given us the opportunity and now it's up to us and the world as to whether we will survive or not.




Very wonderfully put maxcat.
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bentley
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th



vivico1 wrote:

PaulH wrote:
Alas, I haven't seen it yet, but I'll check out Oprah's site in the meantime.

Bentley: That question about him turning down money has come up before. I also seem to remember his ex-wife saying that they had to bath in a lake in those days.


If you read the segments on Oprah's site, that was the interview, so not to worry.




It was the interview but with so much more that was not in the edited version (I saw and went through both); more continuity etc. I enjoyed the Oprah segments more frankly..but was still disappointed. But he at least confirmed the folklore and confirmed the stories himself on TV.
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th


Wrighty wrote:

PaulH wrote:
I just watched the four or five segments on Oprah's site, and I really thought they were terrific. For a guy who has shun any sort of publicity, he was pretty forthcoming in my opinion. His thoughts on life and how we should appreciate it more were touching.

Did anyone else catch that he said the idea for The Road came to him in El Paso? He was looking out the window of the old hotel and he envisioned the hills on fire. I guess we'll have to rethink the location of the novel now :smileyhappy:

I also think El Paso is interesting in that Cities of the Plains -- the final novel in his Border Trilogy -- takes place there. One could almost imagine an elderly Billy Parham looking out that same hotel window.




I thought the interview was interesting but I was just disappointed because I wanted to hear more about the book. I think he is a fascinating man and it must be very hard to interview someone who is so private and doesn't really want to share about himself. I can understand why Oprah would be nervous about that one. I thought it was really interesting when he said he didn't know any other authors. His circle of friends are all scientist and that's who he enjoys talking to. There was also a comment he made about how he doesn't love to write but he likes his work - something to that effect but I'm sure I have his wording totally wrong. Does anyone else remember that part?




Wrighty,

Here are my notes from that segment:

FIRST PART: THE EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW BEGINS.

Oprah asks about the setting of the Sante Fe Institute. (OPRAH)

McCarthy says that he likes coming to the Sante Fe Institute because there are a lot of bright people there who have a lot of bright things to say.
McCarthy doesn't think that interviews are good for your head.
McCarthy said that when he was a kid he used to write, but when he was a teenager he did not do much of anything. He says that passion is a pretty fancy word. He likes what he does. He thinks that sometimes writing is difficult. You always have the vision of the perfect thing which you can never achieve. But you never stop trying to achieve it. He thinks you have this interior image of something that is absolutely perfect. He thinks that this is your signpost, your guide. He thinks you will never get there; but without it..you will not get anywhere.

When you start out with a book, do you start out with the above image? (OPRAH)

Cormac stated that it is not that much a conscious thing. You always have that hope that today I am going to do something better than I have ever done. Oprah said well there is the hope. And McCarthy commented well how is that for hubris?
So do you write methodically? Do you have a schedule? Does it just come to you? Do you write it as it comes? (OPRAH)

Cormac stated No. Then before he could answer much; Oprah kept cutting him off from his thinking. I think she talks to think and I believe Cormac thinks to talk. So it took him awhile to get everything out.
He then said his answer, but looked pressed and uncomfortable: He then answered by mentioning a commentary about Faulkner and talked about a question asked of Faulkner himself. The question asked of Faulkner was did he write every day or did he write only when he was inspired...Faulkner answered: "I only write when I am inspired, and I am inspired every day."
Cormac stated that you have to treat writing seriously as the work that you do.
Some people say do you plot everything out? No that would be death. You can't just plot things out; you just have to trust in wherever it comes from.
When you started The Road, did you know where it was going to end? Or did it end itself? (OPRAH)

No, I had no idea where it was going.
Where did this apocalyptic dream come from? (OPRAH)

Cormac said: "Well it is interesting, because usually you do not know where a book comes from. It is just there; some kind of an itch that you just can't scratch. My son John and I about four years ago went to El Paso.
And he is eight now? (OPRAH)

Cormac says yeh like he doesn't like being interrupted which she has done again..and he goes on. And we checked into the old hotel there and one night...John was asleep, and he was awake and it was two or three o'clock in the morning and I walked over and stood and looked out of the window (in this El Paso hotel) at this time and there was nothing moving but I could hear the trains just going through. It was a very lonesome sound; and I just had this image of what this town might look like in 50 or 100 years from now. And I just had the image of these fires up on the hills and everything being laid waste and I thought an awful lot about my little boy and so I wrote those pages (that night) and that was the end of it. And then four years later, I was in Ireland, and I woke up one morning and realized that it wasn't two pages in a notebook, it was a book. And it was about that man and that little boy.
Is this a love story to your son? (OPRAH)

Cormac looked very moved and I thought had some tears in his eyes. He paused before answering and then said in a way. And he then blushed. And then he said, but that is kind of embarrassing. I suppose it is.
I just saw you blush! (OPRAH) But when I called you at first, I said people want to know where this book came from and you said it is obvious because it came because my son practically co wrote this book.

Cormac simply had time to say yeh before he was cut off.
If you had not had this son at this time, then this book would not have been written. (OPRAH)

Cormac said: " No, absolutely not."
Cormac stated it never would have occurred to me to write it. Writing a book about a father and a son.
What is it like being a father at this particular time in your life? How is it different than...(OPRAH)

Cormac cuts her off and says I think you appreciate it more . Yeh, if you are young and you have a child; it is so you have a kid; but to have a child when you are older is a ..it wrenches you up out of your nap and makes you look at things fresh. It forces the world on you. Yeh, and I think it is a good thing.
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th


vivico1 wrote:
It surprises me that you guys really thought he was going to "explain" the books or parts of the book. Why? It might actually make the book much less in a person's mind than the wonderful book it is now. I was really glad I read it before the interview, so that I had my ideas, my own feelings about it first and it was overpowering. If Oprah seemed nervous, look, she had to rush out there, had one hour with a man who might get up and walk at any minute. I do have a feeling she did ask, ok what catastrophe happened, people want to know, and what was this or that and I think he probably shrugged it off, so she was trying to get ideas about the man, that might give insight to the book and if you listen some, she did.

There were times in our discussion in here, that I got frustrated because I read the book and it was great without everything having to mean more than exactly what it said. It was like, everyone was searching for some hidden "deeper" meaning behind every single thing that happened, EVERYTHING, when there was such deep meaning right there anyway. I remember saying on one thread, I dont remember what about now, but something to the effect... and maybe it was just that, just what they were doing as father and son at the moment with no bigger greater meaning
.
The interesting thing is in the interview, through two questions Oprah asks, he kinda says just that, "oh I think its a pretty straight forward book, its where the story went" thats actually a paraphrase and he did say he didnt have some grand "God" message in it, but that people could draw from it what they will. THATS what made it so great to us, what we felt ourselves at the end. I dont often hear about men crying over books, but i heard it about this one. If everything was explained away, or if those feelings were taken away by meaning something different than how you felt it, it would not be the book it is.

Also the talk about him being completely poor at times DID give you some insight if you thought about what he said. It wasnt just "stuff" to talk about when all else failed. Two or three times he said...but it was then, in those bleakest times, that something always seemed to come through, i always have a feeling in those times, something would take care of me. He said it might have been naive, but during "those bleakest" times, something did appear, like the toothpaste. I felt he said it several times almost in a way of answering one question we all had and that was, along this road where everything is dead or dying, how do they manage to always find something to eat. I think his belief about his own place, tells you why he was able to write it that way. It was his own personal belief there would be something there.

I had thought the boy in this, in the first part was between 6-8 by the talk and didnt he say thats how old his son was then? I think so anyway.

His message he said was to just be grateful for what we have today, to not take things or people for granted. You know he truly loved his son, and at this age to have a son that young, this was the perfect time in his life to right such a wonderful story about a father and son, "in the bleakest of times". He looked at what he saw in his mind as devastated El Paso and looked at his son and later realised, this is a book. This is a shy brilliant man, who hangs out with scientist and writes about a man and his son in a world that he could learn about from these scientist and what would it be like. His love definately comes through in the book and caring for others.

There are many things in the book that can be symbolic, but let them be symbolic to whatever touched you inside, in your way. We debated what is, about this book so much it nearly took the wonder out of it for me, instead of looking for the wonder in us, if somthing like this happened to us. Sure its got spiritual meaning in it,for each of us but also because its written in a way that he lets you know he does believe in something greater than just us but thats up to us to figure out. If its possible to do this now with a fresh mind, not looking to analyze everything that is said in the book, go back and read it again now, for the story that it is, just read and feel, and see if its different. Now, frankly, after reading the club posts and discussing it some (I came into it the second month) I am very glad i read it all before participating because what I got from it personally was so much more than the constant barrage of "what if it means this, what if it means that" about every well turned phrase in the book! In the end for me it wasnt about ecking out every single thing it MUST have meant, it was about what it meant to "me" and what i came away feeling as "me" that I couldnt shake for a long time.

Yes I would have liked to hear more about some parts of it, but you could tell just listening to the few short answers he gave about the book or writing it, that he wasnt going to go there. I dont think even Oprah could have drug it out of him lol so I dont knock her interview, she was probably hoping for more too but could only go where he would let her but still, if you listen, it was enough.



I certainly listened; but would have loved to have heard more about his thoughts about the imagery and symbolism he used and why. Maybe he just pulled the number 1:17 out of a hat or that was the time that he looked out the window that night in El Paso and that remained with him as the time he got the inspiration to write the book. Like McCarthy, I don't much care about what he did and why; but would like to dispense with some of the theories if they were in fact nonsense. Like the setting that McCarthy envisioned was El Paso! Who would have thought that?...nobody. So that was very interesting..in of itself. And I stick with my original thought. I was disappointed; but that doesn't mean anybody else has to feel that way. My expectations were different and they were high.

Actually, Vivico1, as I recall you came late to the discussion in the second month..so I am not sure how the wonder of it could be lost. I am not sure there were many others still around..but there could have been a second wave when you came. I can't really recall. I know that the wonder of the book was not lost by me or many other folks. But I can only speak for myself.

Anyways, the interview is over. We have seen the man confirm the folklore and we don't know much more than what he said. And he really did not say that much about the book. I doubt he will give another TV interview; who knows maybe we will be surprised. So what we know about the book is still a matter of conjecture and an individual person's interpretation. And of course, it was a pleasure seeing him confirm the stories and anecdotes. That is what I got out of it...Period.
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Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th

All in all, we certainly witnessed a rare treat. I wonder why he finally agreed to an aired interview? He certainly doesn't come across as someone who would be pressured into it?
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bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
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Re: Oprah's Interview with Cormac McCarthy to Air June 5th


PaulH wrote:
All in all, we certainly witnessed a rare treat. I wonder why he finally agreed to an aired interview? He certainly doesn't come across as someone who would be pressured into it?




That is so true Paul. It was good seeing him speak and affirm the anecdotes.

I can see why his father and he did not always see eye to eye. He is quietly stubborn.

I think it was for the same reason he wrote the book and said it was co-authored by his son. It was for the love of a father for his son and it was a tribute to the young boy and everything that young boy came to mean and meant to him This interview will be something that the young boy will remember. In the future he will be able to watch his father on video: see him interviewed by Oprah at the time his dad (a great American writer) won the Pulitzer Prize and the book his dad say he co-authored was Oprah's pick. It was all about that son. Maybe also he wanted a different relationship with this son; one that would have memories (happy ones). I think that as Cormac has gotten older and has had this son; he had mellowed and may have a new lease and new freshness in his life. Maybe he decided he can do something else he has never done before. Maybe too in looking out that window in El Paso he wondered about the future of his little boy and the future he would face alone without his Dad; being 73 he wondered maybe about where he would be in 25 years himself and about how the little boy (maybe 4 at the time) would carry on without him after he had passed on. In twenty five years, the boy would be just 29 (full of youth) and Cormac if he were still alive would be about 98 (at the end of his life and not able to participate in his son's energy and vitality and with the fire of his youth left behind). I think he was questioning his own mortality, his legacy and what he could leave behind for the son he loved so much.
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