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vivico1
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulH wrote:


PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?




That's right. He's the only named character in the novel. Where does the biblical Elijah first appear (book and chapter number)?




He appears in Book 1 of Kings, Chapter 17, which I'm pretty sure can be written as 1:17. That's a familiar number from the beginning of the novel, no?


You guys have some interesting points here. I love the 1:17 and 1 Kings chapter 17. Read the whole chapter and you will find some fascinating things. Yes Elijah was a prophet and after he had sealed the heavens meaning, he said in verse 1 "As the Lord God of Israel liveth, there shall not be dew nor rain these years but according to my word." Pretty gloomy thing to have happen huh. Yes he was directed by God where to travel for food but one of the most interesting stories of Elijah is the story of being sent to the widow to be fed. She was about to prepare the LAST meal for her and her son that they could eat and then lay down and die. See something going on here with a son, and only food left for them and they are dying? He asks her to make him a cake of meal anyway and after make one for her son and if she would do this, her barrel of meal would never run out until the Lord sent rain again so she goes and gives him as he asks and her oil and meal never run out. But her son did get sick and died and he took the son and called on the Lord for the child, that she should not lose him after she gave him food and the soul of the child was again returned to him.
There is a lot in that story of Elijah that you can see here. This Ely seems to see only doom tho but the thing is, there are similarities in the stories and tho he did not seem to really care about the boy or the father, they responded to him as did the widow and the son. The Ely prophet of this book, of these dying days, may have been the prophet fortelling not the son of God, but a Godly son, one that the father recognised, to a new world to come out of this scorched earth. It didnt matter that Ely showed signs of hope left in him, the son did carry the hope in him, as the Messiah did carry the hope of the world. This kind of goes back to something I was talking about on the thread about the father and son and said i could see this boy growing up and becoming a spiritual leader and could see that as a sequal, that you thought would be interesting too Paul. But I dont agree with you that Ely may represent the Holy Spirit, that part of the trinity. The Holy Ghost bears witness of the truth and gives hope, sustains hope and faith. I dont know if i see the Holy Ghost in any character in here but I do see that Ely could be seen as a prophet.
As for the fire theme reoccuring over and over. Fire has always meant life! We need fire to live and it also represents spiritual life, the light of Christ, the fire of hope within. Fire is life to both body and soul and for a book like this with so much spiritual meaning in it, fire would have to be a main theme everywhere.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



vivico1 wrote:

PaulH
You guys have some interesting points here. I love the 1:17 and 1 Kings chapter 17. Read the whole chapter and you will find some fascinating things. Yes Elijah was a prophet and after he had sealed the heavens meaning, he said in verse 1 "As the Lord God of Israel liveth, there shall not be dew nor rain these years but according to my word." Pretty gloomy thing to have happen huh. Yes he was directed by God where to travel for food but one of the most interesting stories of Elijah is the story of being sent to the widow to be fed. She was about to prepare the LAST meal for her and her son that they could eat and then lay down and die. See something going on here with a son, and only food left for them and they are dying? He asks her to make him a cake of meal anyway and after make one for her son and if she would do this, her barrel of meal would never run out until the Lord sent rain again so she goes and gives him as he asks and her oil and meal never run out. But her son did get sick and died and he took the son and called on the Lord for the child, that she should not lose him after she gave him food and the soul of the child was again returned to him.
There is a lot in that story of Elijah that you can see here. This Ely seems to see only doom tho but the thing is, there are similarities in the stories and tho he did not seem to really care about the boy or the father, they responded to him as did the widow and the son. The Ely prophet of this book, of these dying days, may have been the prophet fortelling not the son of God, but a Godly son, one that the father recognised, to a new world to come out of this scorched earth. It didnt matter that Ely showed signs of hope left in him, the son did carry the hope in him, as the Messiah did carry the hope of the world. This kind of goes back to something I was talking about on the thread about the father and son and said i could see this boy growing up and becoming a spiritual leader and could see that as a sequal, that you thought would be interesting too Paul. But I dont agree with you that Ely may represent the Holy Spirit, that part of the trinity. The Holy Ghost bears witness of the truth and gives hope, sustains hope and faith. I dont know if i see the Holy Ghost in any character in here but I do see that Ely could be seen as a prophet.
As for the fire theme reoccuring over and over. Fire has always meant life! We need fire to live and it also represents spiritual life, the light of Christ, the fire of hope within. Fire is life to both body and soul and for a book like this with so much spiritual meaning in it, fire would have to be a main theme everywhere.





Excellent post, viv. I'm not sure he's the Holy Ghost either. I was just trying to connect him to the man and boy. I just re-read his passages and he's pretty hopeless that's for sure. What I hadn't remembered is that he says his real name isn't Ely, and that he wouldn't want to tell his real name, as he wouldn't want people talking about him. Probably just the ranting of a madman, but could he actually be someone of great import that survivors would recognize by name?
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulH wrote:


vivico1 wrote:

PaulH
You guys have some interesting points here. I love the 1:17 and 1 Kings chapter 17. Read the whole chapter and you will find some fascinating things. Yes Elijah was a prophet and after he had sealed the heavens meaning, he said in verse 1 "As the Lord God of Israel liveth, there shall not be dew nor rain these years but according to my word." Pretty gloomy thing to have happen huh. Yes he was directed by God where to travel for food but one of the most interesting stories of Elijah is the story of being sent to the widow to be fed. She was about to prepare the LAST meal for her and her son that they could eat and then lay down and die. See something going on here with a son, and only food left for them and they are dying? He asks her to make him a cake of meal anyway and after make one for her son and if she would do this, her barrel of meal would never run out until the Lord sent rain again so she goes and gives him as he asks and her oil and meal never run out. But her son did get sick and died and he took the son and called on the Lord for the child, that she should not lose him after she gave him food and the soul of the child was again returned to him.
There is a lot in that story of Elijah that you can see here. This Ely seems to see only doom tho but the thing is, there are similarities in the stories and tho he did not seem to really care about the boy or the father, they responded to him as did the widow and the son. The Ely prophet of this book, of these dying days, may have been the prophet fortelling not the son of God, but a Godly son, one that the father recognised, to a new world to come out of this scorched earth. It didnt matter that Ely showed signs of hope left in him, the son did carry the hope in him, as the Messiah did carry the hope of the world. This kind of goes back to something I was talking about on the thread about the father and son and said i could see this boy growing up and becoming a spiritual leader and could see that as a sequal, that you thought would be interesting too Paul. But I dont agree with you that Ely may represent the Holy Spirit, that part of the trinity. The Holy Ghost bears witness of the truth and gives hope, sustains hope and faith. I dont know if i see the Holy Ghost in any character in here but I do see that Ely could be seen as a prophet.
As for the fire theme reoccuring over and over. Fire has always meant life! We need fire to live and it also represents spiritual life, the light of Christ, the fire of hope within. Fire is life to both body and soul and for a book like this with so much spiritual meaning in it, fire would have to be a main theme everywhere.





Excellent post, viv. I'm not sure he's the Holy Ghost either. I was just trying to connect him to the man and boy. I just re-read his passages and he's pretty hopeless that's for sure. What I hadn't remembered is that he says his real name isn't Ely, and that he wouldn't want to tell his real name, as he wouldn't want people talking about him. Probably just the ranting of a madman, but could he actually be someone of great import that survivors would recognize by name?



probably the rantings, or if we go with symbolism again, maybe even a "prophet" does not want his name "taken in vain"?
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

probably the rantings, or if we go with symbolism again, maybe even a "prophet" does not want his name "taken in vain"?




He does say that "there is no God and we are all his prophets", so he does identify himself as a prophet for what's it worth.
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulH wrote:
probably the rantings, or if we go with symbolism again, maybe even a "prophet" does not want his name "taken in vain"?




He does say that "there is no God and we are all his prophets", so he does identify himself as a prophet for what's it worth.


yes I remember,, that's why i am saying, since he doesnt want his real name known, to be misused by someone down the road or something, just as the Lord says not to take God's name in vain, i was just postulating another religious symbolism to Ely and what he says and wondering, do you think that "even" a prophet would not want his name "taken in vain", in otherwords was him saying he didn't want his name known so that it wouldnt be messed with, similar to the biblical phrase "taken in vain".
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

[ Edited ]

vivico1 wrote:

PaulH wrote:
probably the rantings, or if we go with symbolism again, maybe even a "prophet" does not want his name "taken in vain"?




He does say that "there is no God and we are all his prophets", so he does identify himself as a prophet for what's it worth.


yes I remember,, that's why i am saying, since he doesnt want his real name known, to be misused by someone down the road or something, just as the Lord says not to take God's name in vain, i was just postulating another religious symbolism to Ely and what he says and wondering, do you think that "even" a prophet would not want his name "taken in vain", in otherwords was him saying he didn't want his name known so that it wouldnt be messed with, similar to the biblical phrase "taken in vain".




Maybe he doesn't want his name taken in vain, because he is God. A broken old man of a God cast aside by the "Godspoke men" who destroyed the world.

Message Edited by PaulH on 05-03-200704:31 PM

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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulH wrote:


Maybe he doesn't want his name taken in vain, because he is God. A broken old man of a God cast aside by the "Godspoke men" who detroyed the world.


Scary idea huh. But I could see that actually. Not the actual God, before anyone thinks that lol, but representative of what we are doing to Him. We live in a world now where people profess to believe in God, and then we toss aside everything He has said, everything the Savior taught, just to get the things we want and treat each other horribly. The scriptures say in the end, there will be many who call his name but know him not. It seems to me that today, you can ask people if they believe in God or Christ and they will all say yes, even as they walk into the nearest strip bar and its as if yeah I believe in Him, but in the same way you believe in Christopher Columbus, just a figure from history, not someone that is real and should be in your life today. And it will be the downfall of humanity.
Vivian
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


vivico1 wrote:

PaulH wrote:


Maybe he doesn't want his name taken in vain, because he is God. A broken old man of a God cast aside by the "Godspoke men" who detroyed the world.


Scary idea huh. But I could see that actually. Not the actual God, before anyone thinks that lol, but representative of what we are doing to Him. We live in a world now where people profess to believe in God, and then we toss aside everything He has said, everything the Savior taught, just to get the things we want and treat each other horribly. The scriptures say in the end, there will be many who call his name but know him not. It seems to me that today, you can ask people if they believe in God or Christ and they will all say yes, even as they walk into the nearest strip bar and its as if yeah I believe in Him, but in the same way you believe in Christopher Columbus, just a figure from history, not someone that is real and should be in your life today. And it will be the downfall of humanity.




Hello Vivico,

Sorry about you being over here on your own (except for Paul of course)...I think that most of the discussion happened early on..but what I have seen is that there are waves of folks who join in as they finish the book...so I am sure some folks might answer your posts when they check back in or even get a little further.

I think you are right about how folks all profess to believe in God (yes I heard of him maybe just like they heard of Santa Claus) but there isn't any part for God to play in their lives. If you think of the choices that people have to make or are forced to make (food or medicine), old folks without enough to live on, all the corruption in politics, lack of ethics in corporations, jobs all moving overseas to cut costs never mind the effects on the country, violence in our schools and divorce rates high with many children simply left to their own devices, expensive health care and uncertain jobs with a lack of security..you realize the stress that must be prevalent in so many people's lives. I think many folks have simply lost hope that things will ever be better for them. Ely was a prophet and I think heralded the return of God..most likely the son. In the world that was left all of the problems that we think we have like some of the above just weren't problems any more...now people were down to the basics (food and water) and clean enough air to breathe.

It is funny when you are down to the basics..maybe the simplicity and the rhythm of life can come back. Maybe life here in America is treading on thin ice and this book was sort of a wake up call. Don't know but that is another idea...sorry you were alone over here. It happens but your postings will be read and will help out others who pop in later and read what you had to say and they will think about it when they are reading. So your efforts are worthwhile and your comments were terrific.

A few of us have wandered over to The Reluctant Fundamentalist bc and guess who we ran into: Paul H. Glad you liked the book, I too thought it was extremely powerful and the prose was beautiful.

Take care,

Bentley
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maxcat
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

Boy, this is deep, very deep! I just finished the passage concerning Ely and it was profound..I believe the boy is sort of a messenger, someone who will find good out of all this mess. He's innocent of everything around him and wants to help everything and everyone. The father continues to teach the boy even as they talk to Ely. Why isn't the boy allowed to touch him? Does the father suspect something evil with the old man? And Ely is surviving off the goodness of others but gives nothing in return except comments about how everyone will be dead and then the world will be a better place; how Death will be out of a job when no one is left. Is this man a prophet who can foresee into a bleak future where there will be nothing left? I think the idea of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost is very viable here. Did Ely actually exist? After all, the father and son have not met anyone other than " bad guys" on their trek. They even suspected Ely as being a decoy at first and I'm sure the father wasn't pleased with having him stay with them overnight. It seemed kind of odd that Ely showed up out of nowhere on the road. Is he a prophet foretelling the future of the existing world or is he an old man tottering down the highway same as the father and son?
Also, what time period does anyone think this happened? There was a semi truck, but the stores were not mentioned as having computers. Don't you think this is somewhat similar to The War of the Worlds?
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



maxcat wrote:
Boy, this is deep, very deep! I just finished the passage concerning Ely and it was profound..I believe the boy is sort of a messenger, someone who will find good out of all this mess. He's innocent of everything around him and wants to help everything and everyone. The father continues to teach the boy even as they talk to Ely. Why isn't the boy allowed to touch him? Does the father suspect something evil with the old man? And Ely is surviving off the goodness of others but gives nothing in return except comments about how everyone will be dead and then the world will be a better place; how Death will be out of a job when no one is left. Is this man a prophet who can foresee into a bleak future where there will be nothing left? I think the idea of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost is very viable here. Did Ely actually exist? After all, the father and son have not met anyone other than " bad guys" on their trek. They even suspected Ely as being a decoy at first and I'm sure the father wasn't pleased with having him stay with them overnight. It seemed kind of odd that Ely showed up out of nowhere on the road. Is he a prophet foretelling the future of the existing world or is he an old man tottering down the highway same as the father and son?
Also, what time period does anyone think this happened? There was a semi truck, but the stores were not mentioned as having computers. Don't you think this is somewhat similar to The War of the Worlds?




In the Vanity Fair interview, it said that NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MAN was one of 4-5 manuscripts that McCarthy had been working on. You can almost certainly date NCFOM to the very early 80's and I would put THE ROAD somewhere near that time frame. Maybe the mid 80's. In both works, McCarthy toys with the ever elusive 1:17.
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

That is really deep, I have never completely read the Bible but what an interesting fact! Do you think McCarthy put the old man in this book after writing the other book? And why? Is the old man a portent of death that will follow eventually. I take it this disaster happened quite a few years prior to the man and the boy being on the road. To me, since nothing seems to be rejuvenating as far as growth, that everything and everyone will eventually run out of food sources and die. What a scenario for the future if we don't turn things around now, not just global warming but war from a nation that has the capabilities to fire a nuclear warhead at us. I found it interesting that they found a bunker full of food, etc. and no one there. But the place was fully stocked. Whatever happened, must have been a quick thing to not be able to get to your bunker in time. Anyway, back to Ely. So he represents a messenger or prophet that deals with fire and refers to 1:17. I will certainly look this up.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Paul_Hochman
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



maxcat wrote:
That is really deep, I have never completely read the Bible but what an interesting fact! Do you think McCarthy put the old man in this book after writing the other book? And why? Is the old man a portent of death that will follow eventually. I take it this disaster happened quite a few years prior to the man and the boy being on the road. To me, since nothing seems to be rejuvenating as far as growth, that everything and everyone will eventually run out of food sources and die. What a scenario for the future if we don't turn things around now, not just global warming but war from a nation that has the capabilities to fire a nuclear warhead at us. I found it interesting that they found a bunker full of food, etc. and no one there. But the place was fully stocked. Whatever happened, must have been a quick thing to not be able to get to your bunker in time. Anyway, back to Ely. So he represents a messenger or prophet that deals with fire and refers to 1:17. I will certainly look this up.




While we'll probably never know which book McCarthy was working on first or maybe he was working on them simultaneously, hence the cross-over use of 1:17, but I do know that the last book in his Border Trilogy (Cities of the Plain)was actually penned first.
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


maxcat wrote:
That is really deep, I have never completely read the Bible but what an interesting fact! Do you think McCarthy put the old man in this book after writing the other book? And why? Is the old man a portent of death that will follow eventually. I take it this disaster happened quite a few years prior to the man and the boy being on the road. To me, since nothing seems to be rejuvenating as far as growth, that everything and everyone will eventually run out of food sources and die. What a scenario for the future if we don't turn things around now, not just global warming but war from a nation that has the capabilities to fire a nuclear warhead at us. I found it interesting that they found a bunker full of food, etc. and no one there. But the place was fully stocked. Whatever happened, must have been a quick thing to not be able to get to your bunker in time. Anyway, back to Ely. So he represents a messenger or prophet that deals with fire and refers to 1:17. I will certainly look this up.


Read 1 Kings chapter 17 about Elijah and the widow with food for just one more meal with her son between her and death. Could be some connection.
Vivian
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

Yes I have heard of that story, vivico. Elijah seems to be someone of good intentions and helped people along the way. But does Ely do that? He sounds ominous and will be glad when everyone dies as the world will be better. How can that be?
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


maxcat wrote:
Yes I have heard of that story, vivico. Elijah seems to be someone of good intentions and helped people along the way. But does Ely do that? He sounds ominous and will be glad when everyone dies as the world will be better. How can that be?


I just mean, here in the bible is a prophet who meets a parent with a son, who has little to eat and is about to die in a world dying of a drought and yet, they give of their last meal, for them it is a saving moment. In the book, Eli meets a parent with a son who give of their last food in a world that is dying of something and they give him of their little food. One prophet is of the God of the living, this prophet is a prophet of the dead. Both play a major role in the lives of those they meet. Its no coincidence that either meet these two little families. The widow had enough faith, to give of her last meal, the boy had enough hope (the fire) to give of theirs. Eli is not the Elijah of the bible or of hope, he is the antithesis prophet, but both are stories not to teach about the prophet in these instances instead of those who met them. It is their story because of their faith and hope.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



bentley wrote:
What did you make of the almost blind old man named Ely telling the father:

"There is no God and we are his prophets."

Or when the father answered the old man by saying:

"What if I said he was a god."

This section of the book devoted to Ely is significant. There were many important interactions in this encounter beyond the two (2) exchanges cited above. What was your take on them and what was Ely and/or the father implying..if anything?




I read the quote from Ely, "There is no God and we are his prophets", as denouncing religion. Before that Ely claims that he'd seen the end coming and that people had been preparing for it. I'm of the opinion that the cause of the catastrophe was something that man brought upon themselves, not an alien invasion or meteors or anything. Ely is a very obviously atheist (or at least bitter agnostic) character so I don't agree with him being a biblical allusion. Especially since he just made up the name Ely and it wasn't even his name. Later when the man says that maybe his son believes in God, Ely says "He'll get over it."

When Ely said that there is no God and we are his prophets, a "prophet" should be seen as an earthly example of the divine. Since the world is reduced to ash and people eat their own children, this quote is pure sarcasm. These cannibals being prophets of God obviously shows that God doesn't exist, or if he does that he's abandoned them. Plus, prophets are supposed to spread the message of God's word to the world. What message are the cannibals sending, and to whom?

Sarcasm. Pure and simple.
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bentley
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



randomsense wrote:


bentley wrote:
What did you make of the almost blind old man named Ely telling the father:

"There is no God and we are his prophets."

Or when the father answered the old man by saying:

"What if I said he was a god."

This section of the book devoted to Ely is significant. There were many important interactions in this encounter beyond the two (2) exchanges cited above. What was your take on them and what was Ely and/or the father implying..if anything?




I read the quote from Ely, "There is no God and we are his prophets", as denouncing religion. Before that Ely claims that he'd seen the end coming and that people had been preparing for it. I'm of the opinion that the cause of the catastrophe was something that man brought upon themselves, not an alien invasion or meteors or anything. Ely is a very obviously atheist (or at least bitter agnostic) character so I don't agree with him being a biblical allusion. Especially since he just made up the name Ely and it wasn't even his name. Later when the man says that maybe his son believes in God, Ely says "He'll get over it."

When Ely said that there is no God and we are his prophets, a "prophet" should be seen as an earthly example of the divine. Since the world is reduced to ash and people eat their own children, this quote is pure sarcasm. These cannibals being prophets of God obviously shows that God doesn't exist, or if he does that he's abandoned them. Plus, prophets are supposed to spread the message of God's word to the world. What message are the cannibals sending, and to whom?

Sarcasm. Pure and simple.




Ely is a prophet symbol..he may not have fit the bill for what a prophet is supposed to be in terms of your definition but in McCarthy's own words..the book is about the love that a father and son have for each other and the hope for survival. McCarthy devoted this book to his young son and I saw the beauty in that shared love and a hope in a world destroyed...where only because of that love that hope still burned in their hearts. There has been a lot of great discussion regarding this book already and the posts were all insightful regarding the varying opinions of the book and the reasons for the calamity. I tend to agree with you that the destruction was caused by man and there was a very good debate about this already; others felt that it was a meteorite. Also, not all of the remaining humans were cannibals...the father and son certainly were not. Hope you enjoy the book; everyone got something different from their reading.
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CHolland
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

With regards to Ely, I see the connection, however I will attempt to shed a little more light onto the question. Through my first read, I took Ely as a symbol of the state of humanity, and that Ely was, metaphorically, humanity. Humanity was in the same decrepit and downtrodden state as the old man. I came to this because Ely said "I could be anybody." However, I do find the allusion interesting and point too Luke 1:17 (there's the number again):

Luk 1:17 And he shall go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.

Now, here's where I'm going to try to mesh this all together. This passage in the Bible is about John the Baptist. Now, if Ely is humanity, then humanity is Ely, therefore humanity made the way for "him" (Christ in the Bible verse and the son in the story). Thus, reaffirming the son as a Messianic figure.

I'm not dogmatically saying that this is true; I am a high school kid who read The Road for class and loved it. I'm just offering my interpretation, and could someone please give me some direction on the fire metaphor? Because that could mean experience, mythological allusions, life, Biblical allusions, so I was just wondering if someone could shed some light on that for me.
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jeffreysee
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎04-12-2008
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

Hmm...How about Revelations?

"And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. And he laid his right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first and the last:"

Check out the cross-references for possible clues:

http://bible.cc/revelation/1-17.htm
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Sticks
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-10-2009
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Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

When he says "there is no God and we are his prophets" I took that to mean that this world is nothing and there is no God. Prophets followed Jesus like all of these people who are left wander the waste lands following nothing. So there is no God and the people in on Earth follow nothing.

 

Fake prophets for a fake God.

 

I am most likely way off base with this.

 

 

"What if I said he was god?"

 

I noticed something here. In every other instance the word God has been capitalized but when the man said it about the boy it was not. Anyone else think it was on purpose or an I just grasping at straws.

 

 

I honestly do not think the man thought he son God or a God at all. Just in a world where there was no God and Earth was hell the why should not the only good thing left be God? Or as good as a God? Maybe? Yes, no?

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