Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

[ Edited ]
Awhile back PaulH indicated to me that I could start a new thread to talk about Ely and the section in The Road devoted to this encounter. In the paperback version, this starts on page 161 and goes on through page 175 (with the man thinking about the old man and his own mortality).

It struck me that McCarthy was making a biblical reference to Elijah the prophet. In opening up this thread, I thought that possibly we could discuss various aspects of this encounter and some of the feelings that some of you had concerning this segment of the novel and the dialogue.

I will copy over the posting that I made awhile back regarding this significant character (Ely) and the biblical prophet I think McCarthy was referencing with the old man.

Interested to see what all of you think about this connection and about some of the dialogue in this section.

Below is the earlier post with the url:

======================================================================================

Regarding Ely:

I found this writeup on the prophet Elijah who performed feats with fire. And I thought I would post it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elijah

The particular exchange in the book with the old man called Ely was interesting to me and I will get back to it here when I have more time

Message Edited by bentley on 04-08-200709:13 PM

Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

What did you make of the almost blind old man named Ely telling the father:

"There is no God and we are his prophets."

Or when the father answered the old man by saying:

"What if I said he was a god."

This section of the book devoted to Ely is significant. There were many important interactions in this encounter beyond the two (2) exchanges cited above. What was your take on them and what was Ely and/or the father implying..if anything?
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

[ Edited ]

bentley wrote:
What did you make of the almost blind old man named Ely telling the father:

"There is no God and we are his prophets."

Or when the father answered the old man by saying:

"What if I said he was a god."

This section of the book devoted to Ely is significant. There were many important interactions in this encounter beyond the two (2) exchanges cited above. What was your take on them and what was Ely and/or the father implying..if anything?




Thanks for posting this, Bentley. I'll say it again, I think the son (son of man) is very much a Christ figure and the father is going so far as to say it outright here. Also, at the Seder, a cup of wine is left to welcome Elijah whose presence will signal the coming of the Messiah. The boy again as Messiah, no?

Message Edited by PaulH on 04-09-200708:41 AM

Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulH wrote:

bentley wrote:
What did you make of the almost blind old man named Ely telling the father:

"There is no God and we are his prophets."

Or when the father answered the old man by saying:

"What if I said he was a god."

This section of the book devoted to Ely is significant. There were many important interactions in this encounter beyond the two (2) exchanges cited above. What was your take on them and what was Ely and/or the father implying..if anything?




Thanks for posting this, Bentley. I'll say it again, I think the son (son of man) is very much a Christ figure and the father is going so far as to say it outright here. Also, at the Seder, a cup of wine is left to welcome Elijah whose presence will signal the coming of the Messiah. The boy again as Messiah, no?

Message Edited by PaulH on 04-09-200708:41 AM






We may be stretching it to indicate that the boy is the Messiah but I think that McCarthy is leading us that way with the dialogue (both the man and the son) and the choice of the name Ely. I have to say that McCarthy spent a lot of time with this character and obviously considered it important. Instead of wine though, he got fruit cocktail when he came upon the son. Ely even stated that he knew this was coming. He also said and I thought this was a great quote:

"People were always getting ready for tomorrow. I didn't believe in that. Tomorrow wasn't getting ready for them. It didn't even know they were there."

Anyways, it would be interesting to see what others think about this section of the book and what other symbolism they may have noticed. I do not look at the father as being a Joseph type figure and the boy's mother certainly was not like Mary in the biblical sense...but maybe these two folks were a second set of parents and this is a newer testament being fictionally started according to McCarthy. Not sure since thankfully this is fiction.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?




That's right. He's the only named character in the novel. Where does the biblical Elijah first appear (book and chapter number)?
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?




That's right. He's the only named character in the novel. Where does the biblical Elijah first appear (book and chapter number)?




He appears in Book 1 of Kings, Chapter 17, which I'm pretty sure can be written as 1:17. That's a familiar number from the beginning of the novel, no?
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulH wrote:


PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?




That's right. He's the only named character in the novel. Where does the biblical Elijah first appear (book and chapter number)?




He appears in Book 1 of Kings, Chapter 17, which I'm pretty sure can be written as 1:17. That's a familiar number from the beginning of the novel, no?




My goodness...maybe we are overanalyzing but you are right..maybe McCarthy is creating a puzzle for all of us. "The clocks stopped at 1:17."

What do you think about the choice of parents for the boy. Were the first set making way for the set of parents who found the boy?

Another thing I thought was curious was that the boy did not appear to be upset as they took off, in fact he never looked back at Eli and Eli went down the road like something out of "an antique time". But the father watched the old man and even thought about him when night came and he questioned how he was to die (of God I can only imagine)and he hoped that the son had gone back to sleep.

But if the son was a God or God and the father believed that..then who was he talking to when he spoke to God in the night and also asked how he was to die. There were a few instances in the novel when the father talked to the sky or invoked God..who was he talking to then..God the father?

This section of the book and the encounter with Eli is a major section of the book. Because McCarthy took a long time with it and developed the character of Eli almost more than any other character in the novel aside from the father and the son.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



bentley wrote:

PaulH wrote:


PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?




That's right. He's the only named character in the novel. Where does the biblical Elijah first appear (book and chapter number)?




He appears in Book 1 of Kings, Chapter 17, which I'm pretty sure can be written as 1:17. That's a familiar number from the beginning of the novel, no?




My goodness...maybe we are overanalyzing but you are right..maybe McCarthy is creating a puzzle for all of us. "The clocks stopped at 1:17."

What do you think about the choice of parents for the boy. Were the first set making way for the set of parents who found the boy?

Another thing I thought was curious was that the boy did not appear to be upset as they took off, in fact he never looked back at Eli and Eli went down the road like something out of "an antique time". But the father watched the old man and even thought about him when night came and he questioned how he was to die (of God I can only imagine)and he hoped that the son had gone back to sleep.

But if the son was a God or God and the father believed that..then who was he talking to when he spoke to God in the night and also asked how he was to die. There were a few instances in the novel when the father talked to the sky or invoked God..who was he talking to then..God the father?

This section of the book and the encounter with Eli is a major section of the book. Because McCarthy took a long time with it and developed the character of Eli almost more than any other character in the novel aside from the father and the son.




I'm with you, Bentley. I was entertaining the idea of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost theme.

You've got me thinking about the idea of the man as a surrogate parent, which is really interesting. Is the man's key role to actually deliver the boy to something/someone?
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:

PaulH wrote:


PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?




That's right. He's the only named character in the novel. Where does the biblical Elijah first appear (book and chapter number)?




He appears in Book 1 of Kings, Chapter 17, which I'm pretty sure can be written as 1:17. That's a familiar number from the beginning of the novel, no?




My goodness...maybe we are overanalyzing but you are right..maybe McCarthy is creating a puzzle for all of us. "The clocks stopped at 1:17."

What do you think about the choice of parents for the boy. Were the first set making way for the set of parents who found the boy?

Another thing I thought was curious was that the boy did not appear to be upset as they took off, in fact he never looked back at Eli and Eli went down the road like something out of "an antique time". But the father watched the old man and even thought about him when night came and he questioned how he was to die (of God I can only imagine)and he hoped that the son had gone back to sleep.

But if the son was a God or God and the father believed that..then who was he talking to when he spoke to God in the night and also asked how he was to die. There were a few instances in the novel when the father talked to the sky or invoked God..who was he talking to then..God the father?

This section of the book and the encounter with Eli is a major section of the book. Because McCarthy took a long time with it and developed the character of Eli almost more than any other character in the novel aside from the father and the son.




I'm with you, Bentley. I was entertaining the idea of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost theme.

You've got me thinking about the idea of the man as a surrogate parent, which is really interesting. Is the man's key role to actually deliver the boy to something/someone?




PaulH,

I am beginning to agree with the trinity idea. Possibly the father was meant to take care of the son and deliver him safely (without his being cognizant of his mission possibly)..he certainly was intent in keeping the son alive and even I think protected the son from the mother. It was very interesting but on page 59 of the paperback version, the father describes the birth of the son and the mother.

He says (in describing the mother)

"Always so deliberate, hardly surpised by the most outlandish advents"

I think that advent is a curious word used by McCarthy for her and here is the on-line dictionary meaning.

ad·vent

NOUN:

The coming or arrival, especially of something extremely important: the advent of the computer.

Advent
The liturgical period preceding Christmas, beginning in Western churches on the fourth Sunday before Christmas and in Eastern churches in mid-November, and observed by many Christians as a season of prayer, fasting, and penitence.

Christianity The coming of Jesus at the Incarnation.

Christianity See Second Coming.

McCarthy then goes on to state about the wife (I can't say that I saw much mothering going on so she seems to be the wife to me): "A creation perfectly evolved to meet its own end." This seemed to me that she was simply a vessal.

They had a "midnight supper" and then he described the birth and this line really jumped out at me when I even read it the first time. "Her cries meant nothing to him." (meaning the father and husband). He did not care anything about the pain that she was going through in this delivery only that the son was safe and born.

"He held aloft the scrawny red body so raw and naked and cut the cord with kitchen shears and wrapped his son in a towel." (Curiously, he did not say our son)

I think that the woman was done with the child the moment he was born; the father took over and had "his son" to protect. The woman at that point I think was really on her own. The father never tried that hard to keep her safe and didn't even follow her up the road to talk her out of it. And the boy..just said.."She's gone isn't she". Hardly exhibited much of a loss for either of them. He even left her picture on the road itself. Like the picture of religious martyrs who gave their life for the cause. Hardly a devoted husband worried about his wife in pain.

I think possibly he was meant to secure the son for his purpose and protect him as long as he could. The new family seemed more intuned with spiritual values and the new mother...more motherly and loving and spiritual (based upon the very limited information given by McCarthy).

Again who knows we could be overanalyzing but McCarthy's choice of words is not an accident. But this is a fictional novel so the author has a great deal of license.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



bentley wrote:

PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:

PaulH wrote:


PaulH wrote:


bentley wrote:


PaulH wrote:
"Elijah was described as ascending into heaven in a fiery chariot"

Right back to our strongest symbol in the book -- Fire!




I know isn't it amazing..And it is not by accident either.

I might be mistaken but isn't Ely the only character that was named in any way?




That's right. He's the only named character in the novel. Where does the biblical Elijah first appear (book and chapter number)?




He appears in Book 1 of Kings, Chapter 17, which I'm pretty sure can be written as 1:17. That's a familiar number from the beginning of the novel, no?




My goodness...maybe we are overanalyzing but you are right..maybe McCarthy is creating a puzzle for all of us. "The clocks stopped at 1:17."

What do you think about the choice of parents for the boy. Were the first set making way for the set of parents who found the boy?

Another thing I thought was curious was that the boy did not appear to be upset as they took off, in fact he never looked back at Eli and Eli went down the road like something out of "an antique time". But the father watched the old man and even thought about him when night came and he questioned how he was to die (of God I can only imagine)and he hoped that the son had gone back to sleep.

But if the son was a God or God and the father believed that..then who was he talking to when he spoke to God in the night and also asked how he was to die. There were a few instances in the novel when the father talked to the sky or invoked God..who was he talking to then..God the father?

This section of the book and the encounter with Eli is a major section of the book. Because McCarthy took a long time with it and developed the character of Eli almost more than any other character in the novel aside from the father and the son.




I'm with you, Bentley. I was entertaining the idea of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost theme.

You've got me thinking about the idea of the man as a surrogate parent, which is really interesting. Is the man's key role to actually deliver the boy to something/someone?




PaulH,

I am beginning to agree with the trinity idea. Possibly the father was meant to take care of the son and deliver him safely (without his being cognizant of his mission possibly)..he certainly was intent in keeping the son alive and even I think protected the son from the mother. It was very interesting but on page 59 of the paperback version, the father describes the birth of the son and the mother.

He says (in describing the mother)

"Always so deliberate, hardly surpised by the most outlandish advents"

I think that advent is a curious word used by McCarthy for her and here is the on-line dictionary meaning.

ad·vent

NOUN:

The coming or arrival, especially of something extremely important: the advent of the computer.

Advent
The liturgical period preceding Christmas, beginning in Western churches on the fourth Sunday before Christmas and in Eastern churches in mid-November, and observed by many Christians as a season of prayer, fasting, and penitence.

Christianity The coming of Jesus at the Incarnation.

Christianity See Second Coming.

McCarthy then goes on to state about the wife (I can't say that I saw much mothering going on so she seems to be the wife to me): "A creation perfectly evolved to meet its own end." This seemed to me that she was simply a vessal.

They had a "midnight supper" and then he described the birth and this line really jumped out at me when I even read it the first time. "Her cries meant nothing to him." (meaning the father and husband). He did not care anything about the pain that she was going through in this delivery only that the son was safe and born.

"He held aloft the scrawny red body so raw and naked and cut the cord with kitchen shears and wrapped his son in a towel." (Curiously, he did not say our son)

I think that the woman was done with the child the moment he was born; the father took over and had "his son" to protect. The woman at that point I think was really on her own. The father never tried that hard to keep her safe and didn't even follow her up the road to talk her out of it. And the boy..just said.."She's gone isn't she". Hardly exhibited much of a loss for either of them. He even left her picture on the road itself. Like the picture of religious martyrs who gave their life for the cause. Hardly a devoted husband worried about his wife in pain.

I think possibly he was meant to secure the son for his purpose and protect him as long as he could. The new family seemed more intuned with spiritual values and the new mother...more motherly and loving and spiritual (based upon the very limited information given by McCarthy).

Again who knows we could be overanalyzing but McCarthy's choice of words is not an accident. But this is a fictional novel so the author has a great deal of license.




Excellent post! Yes. We could be over-analyzing, but it sure makes looking at the novel extremely interesting. We can pretty well guess that McCarthy's not going to clear up all our questions in his Oprah interview.

Speculate on!
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

PaulH wrote:


Excellent post! Yes. We could be over-analyzing, but it sure makes looking at the novel extremely interesting. We can pretty well guess that McCarthy's not going to clear up all our questions in his Oprah interview.

Speculate on!



Yes, it does make it more interesting. Since McCarthy is so reclusive..I am even surprised that he is going to be on Oprah.

We will have to wait and see.
Contributor
PaulFrancis
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎04-10-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

As mentioned by others, Ely was the only character given a name. His demeanor changed from a babbling blind man to a near sage after he was invited to eat and rest with father and son, which I found perplexing.

Ely claimed to stay alive on the good will of others. This was the readers first example that such an act was even possible in their world. Although the father claimed he was only hospitable to Ely on account of the boy, Ely's visit must have altered his thinking. I didn't realize it when I first read the passage but this may have been the turning point when the father decided his son had a fighting chance to find the "good guys" in the absence of his protection.

During his visit Ely really did not offer any good will to father or son. How was it that Ely denied the possibility that hope was remotely tenable during his discussion with the father, yet the boy still believed they did the right thing with their charity?

PaulFrancis
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


PaulFrancis wrote:
As mentioned by others, Ely was the only character given a name. His demeanor changed from a babbling blind man to a near sage after he was invited to eat and rest with father and son, which I found perplexing.

Ely claimed to stay alive on the good will of others. This was the readers first example that such an act was even possible in their world. Although the father claimed he was only hospitable to Ely on account of the boy, Ely's visit must have altered his thinking. I didn't realize it when I first read the passage but this may have been the turning point when the father decided his son had a fighting chance to find the "good guys" in the absence of his protection.

During his visit Ely really did not offer any good will to father or son. How was it that Ely denied the possibility that hope was remotely tenable during his discussion with the father, yet the boy still believed they did the right thing with their charity?

PaulFrancis




It sounds like what America does with its international aide packages. We give money abroad to countries that do not care for us. Charity is charity and the charitable thing I guess is to give to all not just those who cater to you or who are grateful. I guess the charitable thing is not to ask or expect gratitude or anything else in return. I think that is pretty difficult for most of us to understand. We all want something in return for everything we do; even a thank you is an expectation on our part. To give anonymously without any expectations of any kind is true charity. The boy expected nothing and still gave. A truly charitable and noble act. Ely's purpose I think was just to be the prophet and serve that purpose with his pronouncements and maybe simply by his showing up when he did to announce the upcoming arrival of the "divine". McCarthy gives us so few clues and the ones he gives are vague so it is all a matter of conjecture. And of course thank goodness this is a work of fiction so no answers may be forthcoming and I can live with that.
Distinguished Bibliophile
Paul_Hochman
Posts: 2,801
Registered: ‎03-23-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

This scene also brings to mind the religious act of Almsgiving.
Frequent Contributor
Erato
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎11-06-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)

I re-read it and still was am not sure of the message or McCarthy's intent for what we should understand.....but I gathered a few tidbits that might help to piece that puzzle together. Again, I think he draws much from myth and biblical stories. Some observations......

Does Ely represents the prophet Elijah, who is forecast to return on Judgment Day?

Elijah, (Ely, Eli) Isn't he the one who denounced Baal? And wasn't he was "miraculously" fed by ravens or crows while out "on the road" and afraid for his life? (and the name Cormac comes from the Gaelic; son of raven).....


The son says... no sir.... yes sir, to Ely; he shows respect with his manners.
On the otherhand, Ely doesn't even thank the son for the food or wish them luck on their journey. He has no social graces to give.

Ely and Eli the prophet are both blind, but not completely.

And Ely in the novel says it isn't his real name.....that he doesn't 'trust' them with his real name.

Didn't Elijah's sons disgrace him somehow?

Ely tells the father, "Things will be better when everybody's gone."

"Better for who?
Everybody....We'll all breathe easier...When we're all gone at last then there'll be nobody here but death and his days will be numbered too. He'll be out in the road there with nothing to do and nobody to do it to. He'll say: Where did everybody go? And that's how it will be. What's wrong with that?

"When the father suggests that his son might be a god, a young Prometheus carrying the fire of human life, the old man tells him it wouldn't matter if he was: "Where men cant live gods fare no better. You'll see."

"Goodness" will save them, the man tells his son; "it has before and it will again." He gives his son hope and therefore he gives the reader a ray of hope as well.
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



PaulH wrote:
This scene also brings to mind the religious act of Almsgiving.




True
Frequent Contributor
bentley
Posts: 2,509
Registered: ‎01-31-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)


Erato wrote:
I re-read it and still was am not sure of the message or McCarthy's intent for what we should understand.....but I gathered a few tidbits that might help to piece that puzzle together. Again, I think he draws much from myth and biblical stories. Some observations......

Does Ely represents the prophet Elijah, who is forecast to return on Judgment Day?

Elijah, (Ely, Eli) Isn't he the one who denounced Baal? And wasn't he was "miraculously" fed by ravens or crows while out "on the road" and afraid for his life? (and the name Cormac comes from the Gaelic; son of raven).....


The son says... no sir.... yes sir, to Ely; he shows respect with his manners.
On the otherhand, Ely doesn't even thank the son for the food or wish them luck on their journey. He has no social graces to give.

Ely and Eli the prophet are both blind, but not completely.

And Ely in the novel says it isn't his real name.....that he doesn't 'trust' them with his real name.

Didn't Elijah's sons disgrace him somehow?

Ely tells the father, "Things will be better when everybody's gone."

"Better for who?
Everybody....We'll all breathe easier...When we're all gone at last then there'll be nobody here but death and his days will be numbered too. He'll be out in the road there with nothing to do and nobody to do it to. He'll say: Where did everybody go? And that's how it will be. What's wrong with that?

"When the father suggests that his son might be a god, a young Prometheus carrying the fire of human life, the old man tells him it wouldn't matter if he was: "Where men cant live gods fare no better. You'll see."

"Goodness" will save them, the man tells his son; "it has before and it will again." He gives his son hope and therefore he gives the reader a ray of hope as well.




I agree with you that the section was perplexing..not sure about the name connections with Cormac..(but an interesting one)..Regarding Eli..I believe as well that he was used to represent the prophet Elijah (although he seemed more a prophet of doom rather than hope). However, the only ray of hope in the novel was the son and the family who he found or who found him.
Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Regarding Ely (Possible Spoiler)



PaulFrancis wrote:
Ely claimed to stay alive on the good will of others. This was the readers first example that such an act was even possible in their world.



I think this is the key. I think Ely represented trust. Generally, we live in a nation based on trust in our fellow man. We trust people to follow not only laws, but societal norms. We carry on with our own lives with this trust as an implicit backdrop. In reading this book, we see a world where the man doesn't trust anyone anymore. However, Ely still lives by trusting others, trusting that they not only will not harm him, but that they will sustain him. I think it is pivotal for the boy to see an example of such a human being.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Users Online
Currently online: 36 members 252 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: