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L_Monty
Posts: 900
Registered: ‎12-30-2008
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A Moment of Silence for Michael Jackson

Someone at another board I visited brought this up (this is the whole article, by the way):

WASHINGTON (CNN) – The House of Representatives held a moment of silence Friday morning to mark the passing of legendary singer Michael Jackson.
"His heart couldn't get any bigger, and yesterday, it arrested," said Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. "I come to the floor today on behalf of a generation to thank God for letting all of us live in his generation and in his era."

He was outraged that the congress would give a moment of silence for Michael Jackson. His argument was that it constituted "star-[term for sexual congress here]" and was disgusting. For the most part, his argument devolved to being angry at the crimes Jackson committed, irrespective of the fact that he was acquitted. However, another poster was supportive of the gesture, pointing out that Jackson basically revolutionized two art forms (dance, in which everyone rips him off, and video, which he essentially created as an art), broke through MTV's unintentional but essentially very real color barrier, and raised millions of dollars for people living in poverty via "We Are the World."

 

So I was curious what you thought. Inappropriate gesture? (If so, just for Jackson, or should congress get out of this business altogether?) Appropriate gesture?  

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Jon_B
Posts: 1,893
Registered: ‎07-15-2008
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Re: A Moment of Silence for Michael Jackson

[ Edited ]

I don't see why anyone would be outraged over this, other than people who are looking for a reasons to be outraged.  The main reason seems to be that a.) Congress has other things to do (true, but this barely took up any time)  and b.) Michael Jackson is famous and this is a sign of the evil Hollywood liberals destroying our society etc. and etc. - which makes me wonder if those same people were equally outraged by Jackson's visit with President Reagan, and with Reagan's generous public praise for Jackson.

 

 

Message Edited by Jon_B on 06-29-2009 09:25 AM
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: A Moment of Silence for Michael Jackson

Have Congress honoured other celebrities in this way - if so who?  Elvis, for instance?  

 

 


Jon_B wrote:

I don't see why anyone would be outraged over this, other than people who are looking for a reasons to be outraged.  The main reason seems to be that a.) Congress has other things to do (true, but this barely took up any time)  and b.) Michael Jackson is famous and this is a sign of the evil Hollywood liberals destroying our society etc. and etc. - which makes me wonder if those same people were equally outraged by Jackson's visit with President Reagan, and with Reagan's generous public praise for Jackson.

 

 

Message Edited by Jon_B on 06-29-2009 09:25 AM

 

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L_Monty
Posts: 900
Registered: ‎12-30-2008
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Re: A Moment of Silence for Michael Jackson


Choisya wrote:
Have Congress honoured other celebrities in this way - if so who?  Elvis, for instance?

I don't know about Elvis, but I do know he shook hands with Nixon and got some kind of honorary badge because he wanted to help root out anti-American elements. That said, there are numerous government awards or recognition citizens can get and that entertainers have gotten. I don't know how many moments of silence have been granted, though, since that seems like the sort of stat no one would be tracking. But just to give you an idea of how high the level of celebrity recognition has gone officially, the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the highest civilian honor given by the U.S. — was conferred on University of Alabama football coach Bear Bryant. Bryant was a good coach, but it's not like he was doing anything Bono-like in the off-hours.
RTA
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RTA
Posts: 920
Registered: ‎08-19-2008

Re: A Moment of Silence for Michael Jackson

 

Are you kidding me!?  Of all Congress's recent (and not so recent) decisions, that's what some people choose to bunch their panties over?

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TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: A Moment of Silence for Michael Jackson


RTA wrote:
 

Are you kidding me!?  Of all Congress's recent (and not so recent) decisions, that's what some people choose to bunch their panties over?


Better than the report from last revealing that congress spends 30% of their time collectively naming silly holidays; onion day, national secretaries day, ect..

 

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JennGrrl
Posts: 54
Registered: ‎04-23-2009

Re: A Moment of Silence for Michael Jackson

I did a brief search for moments of silence held in Congress and came up with a whole lot of them.  This isn't an uncommon thing, apparently.  I didn't research entertainers specifically, but there were enough people listed that I'm sure it's a pretty eclectic group, not to mention the moments held for the troops, for Holocaust remembrance, etc.

 

I don't care if you loved MJ or hated him, he's still someone's family member: father, brother, son, uncle, etc.  If you don't want to like him, fine, but at least respect that fact.

 

I just look at it that way.

 

I don't care if Congress had a moment of silence.  Good for them.  Maybe that's something that 20 years from now MJ's kids will hear about and feel pride in.  All of this isn't about him, but about the people who loved him; the people still here.  That's all a funeral or memorial or moment of silence ever is, really.