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cork_dork_mom
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎07-17-2009
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Cuts to education at the state and federal level

I have been reading a lot about the cuts that will be made to education at the federal level as well as at the state level. Talking about cutting all technology funding, eliminating teachers, eliminating all secondary librarians, etc. (I work at a high school / public library so this really bothers me). It also worries me having a son who is a sophomore in high school.

 

Then I read in the paper this morning that the kids in the U.S. are lagging in science skills. How in the world can we prepare kids for life after high school or get them ready for college when we're cutting teachers and technology? They may be able to run a football or kick a soccer ball but they're sure not going to know how to do the math to build a shed or compile information to do a presentation.

 

Here's my two cents worth... since school is for learning, I think we should cut extracurricular activities first (I live in Texas where football comes before ANYTHING). Paying a coach who happens to teach costs a lot more than just paying a teacher.

 

Not only would this free up some $ but it might even give some kids some free time to :smileysurprised:do homework or just be a kid.

 

I know this is simplistic, but sometimes things are made harder than they really need to be

 

cork_dork_mom
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TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

 


cork_dork_mom wrote:

I have been reading a lot about the cuts that will be made to education at the federal level as well as at the state level. Talking about cutting all technology funding, eliminating teachers, eliminating all secondary librarians, etc. (I work at a high school / public library so this really bothers me). It also worries me having a son who is a sophomore in high school.

 

Then I read in the paper this morning that the kids in the U.S. are lagging in science skills. How in the world can we prepare kids for life after high school or get them ready for college when we're cutting teachers and technology? They may be able to run a football or kick a soccer ball but they're sure not going to know how to do the math to build a shed or compile information to do a presentation.

 

Here's my two cents worth... since school is for learning, I think we should cut extracurricular activities first (I live in Texas where football comes before ANYTHING). Paying a coach who happens to teach costs a lot more than just paying a teacher.

 

Not only would this free up some $ but it might even give some kids some free time to :smileysurprised:do homework or just be a kid.

 

I know this is simplistic, but sometimes things are made harder than they really need to be

 


 

Can I add my 2 cents to that. Let's let professional sports have a condition that they must fund school level sports entirely in the states they reside. Cut the pro salaries just 5% and there'd never be need of any other funding.

 

Frequent Contributor
CasperAZ
Posts: 1,164
Registered: ‎01-01-2011
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

cork_dork_mom, I agree that the extracurricular activities should take top priority when it comes to budget cuts.

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Correspondent
cork_dork_mom
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎07-17-2009

Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

Can I add my 2 cents to that. Let's let professional sports have a condition that they must fund school level sports entirely in the states they reside. Cut the pro salaries just 5% and there'd never be need of any other funding

 

I think this is one of the best ideas I've heard in a long time!!!

cork_dork_mom
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Reader1793
Posts: 107
Registered: ‎01-13-2011
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

Education budget cuts = sad face. Enough said. I am a student myself, and believe that we could cut spending from unnecessary sources and better fund our schools. I will remind you that OUR FUTURE LEADERS ARE BEING EDUCATED NOW? They need the best education possible.
All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream. - EAP
Distinguished Correspondent
scott88
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎11-19-2010

Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

Spending more money on education is not the same as improving education.There was an experiment done where a school was given all the money it wanted and test scores did not improve.

 

We should stop funding schools and fund students instead. Give people the choice of which school they go to and this will force schools to improve. A school should not stay open just becase it is a school it should stay open becuase it is a good shcool.

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Allem-o
Posts: 98
Registered: ‎04-06-2010

Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

 


scott88 wrote:

Spending more money on education is not the same as improving education.There was an experiment done where a school was given all the money it wanted and test scores did not improve.

 

We should stop funding schools and fund students instead. Give people the choice of which school they go to and this will force schools to improve. A school should not stay open just becase it is a school it should stay open becuase it is a good shcool.


 

+1 well said. 

 

The administrative staff should be cut back by about 20% to begin with.  The top notch teachers strive for the admin positions because they pay much better.  Administration is where you want to be if you want good pay.  This then leaves the teaching spots to the less adequate. 

 

We also need to get back to basics.  Why should math be taught different today then it was 30-40 years ago.  Math is math and my experience over the past 15 years is that 4 out of 5 math teachers are poor communicators and teachers of the subject.  

 

Extracurricular activities are not the problem, cut the administrative staff first.  Remember they are STUDENT Athletes. 

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TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

 


Allem-o wrote:

 


scott88 wrote:

Spending more money on education is not the same as improving education.There was an experiment done where a school was given all the money it wanted and test scores did not improve.

 

We should stop funding schools and fund students instead. Give people the choice of which school they go to and this will force schools to improve. A school should not stay open just becase it is a school it should stay open becuase it is a good shcool.


 

+1 well said. 

 

The administrative staff should be cut back by about 20% to begin with.  The top notch teachers strive for the admin positions because they pay much better.  Administration is where you want to be if you want good pay.  This then leaves the teaching spots to the less adequate. 

 

We also need to get back to basics.  Why should math be taught different today then it was 30-40 years ago.  Math is math and my experience over the past 15 years is that 4 out of 5 math teachers are poor communicators and teachers of the subject.  

 

Extracurricular activities are not the problem, cut the administrative staff first.  Remember they are STUDENT Athletes. 


Actually no, math in below collage age level school isn't what it was 40 years ago. Back then you didn't get Algebra till collage level. And multiplication tables were for those lucky enough to attend schools that went beyond the 6th grade. Which most did not.

 

 

True my grandmother survived on basic book keeping skills, addition, and subtraction from her 5th grade math. But by no means could a child of even my era survive with just those rudimentary math skills.

 

 

 

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Allem-o
Posts: 98
Registered: ‎04-06-2010
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level


TiggerBear wrote:

 


Actually no, math in below collage age level school isn't what it was 40 years ago. Back then you didn't get Algebra till collage level.  

 

 


You're kidding right??  They were teaching Calculus and Trig in High School in the 60's. 

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TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

 


Allem-o wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

 


Actually no, math in below collage age level school isn't what it was 40 years ago. Back then you didn't get Algebra till collage level.  

 

 


You're kidding right??  They were teaching Calculus and Trig in High School in the 60's. 


Really depends on which school district. Schools were federally mandated but state regulated till the 90tys.

 

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dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level


Allem-o wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

 


Actually no, math in below collage age level school isn't what it was 40 years ago. Back then you didn't get Algebra till collage level.  

 

 


You're kidding right??  They were teaching Calculus and Trig in High School in the 60's. 


I believe that algebra was the subject matter I had one year in junior high (7th or 8th grade?), and advanced algebra one year in high school (10th), as well as touching on it in elementary school (elementary school in the 60s and jr/sr high in the 70s).  I definitely remember some algebra in 6th grade.  9th grade was geometry, 11th I don't remember the name of, but it included trigonometry and other advanced topics, and I would have had calculus in 12th except that I got sick of math and science (would have had physics that year, too) and took almost all English, French, and Spanish classes senior year.

 

This was in two different states, MD and MA.  The curricula seemed about the same.

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harleyhoney
Posts: 312
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

That was what my high school was like in the 1960's in Washington state, but we were pretty good size.  2000 students in 10th - 12th grades.  French, Spanish, German and Latin for foreign language.  History and English at regular level, advanced level and then Honors level.  College bound students took Plane/Solid Geometry and Biology in 10th grade, Advanced Algebra/Trig and Chemistry in 11th grade and Calculus and Physics in 12th grade.  Had a full music program and old school Auto Shop, too.

 

My kids could take AP classes and for $125 could receive 5 credits from the local community college.  One of my daughter's friends received enough credits that she had sophomore standing when she reached the university.

 

Nancy

 


Actually no, math in below collage age level school isn't what it was 40 years ago. Back then you didn't get Algebra till collage level.  

 

 


You're kidding right??  They were teaching Calculus and Trig in High School in the 60's. 


I believe that algebra was the subject matter I had one year in junior high (7th or 8th grade?), and advanced algebra one year in high school (10th), as well as touching on it in elementary school (elementary school in the 60s and jr/sr high in the 70s).  I definitely remember some algebra in 6th grade.  9th grade was geometry, 11th I don't remember the name of, but it included trigonometry and other advanced topics, and I would have had calculus in 12th except that I got sick of math and science (would have had physics that year, too) and took almost all English, French, and Spanish classes senior year.

 

This was in two different states, MD and MA.  The curricula seemed about the same.


 

 

 

 

 

 

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RTA
Posts: 920
Registered: ‎08-19-2008
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

 


Allem-o wrote:

You're kidding right??  They were teaching Calculus and Trig in High School in the 60's. 


She's probably not kidding.  But, you'll find that a lot of what TiggerBear writes on this board is absolutely fabricated.  She prefers fiction and fantasy to actual knowledge and information.  If you challenge the veracity of her statements, she'll claim the stuff is accurate based on her secret information to which no one can have access.  But, if you have even limited knowledge on whatever topic du jour for which TiggerBear is inventing "facts," you'll know that most of what she writes is total bullshit. 

 

It's fun, though, to read the sort of nonsense she tries to pass off as truth.  It's also fun to watch her go underground and ignore any challenge to the truthfulness of her false claims.  One day she's gone and the next day she's back to inventing new "facts" on a different topic

 

BTW, TiggerBear, I imagine the sort of schools that don’t offer multiplication and algebra in K-12 are probably the same that taught their students to spell college as collage - over and over again. 

 

Anyway, I agree that American students can’t afford any cuts in education.  One need only look to TiggerBear’s posts for daily proof that American students need more education not less…good Lord.

 

 

 

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crzynwrd4lf
Posts: 503
Registered: ‎04-04-2010
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

I'm bothered, which is a major understatement. I'm from WI and every morning when I read the paper I'm more and more disappointed by the actions taken by the political leaders and citizens. The other day the school board in my city voted to cut over 300 jobs, 212 of those jobs being teachers, and also voted to cut the amount of graduation credits. They are also talking about closing a hundred year old elementary school, but when one member of the board suggestion to cut administrators and board members, he was quickly shot down and called a fool.

 

The schools are already crowded and I have a feeling that the teachers they fire are good teachers that don't have seniority, which blows because I've only been out of high school for a few years and I can say first hand that just because a teacher has more experience doesn't make them better. In fact, I had one english teacher who, because he was retiring in three years, decided he didn't need to teach us anymore and estimated our grades based on preference. Another teacher who was retiring soon, would give us the test and the answers the day before and then would let us use notes on the actual test.

 

Here's the major problem though: Neither the parents or the teachers are fighting for the kids. The parents are upset because of the increase in property taxes and the teachers are mad because they have to start paying an insurance premium (like all employees everywhere else) and they will have to have bigger class sizes. They are the ones acting like children throwing temper tantrums and because of this, the kids have had to step up and represent themselves and be the adults. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, for children to defend themselves, but when do ADULTS start to be concerned for their own children?

 

Don't they realize that one day these kids are going to be performing heart surgeries, running businesses, and leading this country?

 

I think it's time for parents, teachers, and politicians to stop fighting over money and power and start thinking of who is actually suffering from all this: the children. If they want to look at it from a selfish stand point then they should think about who will be taking care of them in a nursing home when they are ninety.

 

On a side note, I don't think they should cut extra- curiculars. In some instances, EC's have helped kids do better in school and helped to get them into college. When you talk about getting rid of those you have to remember what it includes: band and orchestra, art, dance, sports, drama, speech/ debate, journalism, FBLA (future business leaders of America).

 

If I had to give a solution to the problem, and if this was a perfect world, I'd suggest that all teachers should take a small pay cut in order to save some the teachers positions from being eliminated. The parents need to start taking an active role in their child's education and remember that school is NOT day care and teachers are NOT the parents. Parents should also have the choice of sending their kids to a better school and having the property taxes that they pay go to that school instead of the district. It'll never happen of course and I'm probably being tyrannical and irrational but something has to be done.

"One potato, two potato, three potato, four/ she's coming for you now, you better lock the door"-- Promise Not To Tell
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Jefferson_Thomas
Posts: 462
Registered: ‎08-04-2010
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Re: Cuts to education at the state and federal level

First, great ideas, you guys -- I salute you!

 

One thing I'd like to see is part of most courses being required to contain practical information:  how to balance a checkbook; how to fill out a typical job application; how compound interest works; why sending in extra principal payments saves so much mortgage money; how to interpret the list of ingredients on a food label; how government works (and fails to work); how to operate a typical voting machine; and so on.

 

What's everyone else think?

 

Jeff