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Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Drug Legalization

And just to add:

 

Alcohol, marijuanna, tobacco, and so on, are all "addictive" and I saw restrictions on their use for health and other reasons. Unfortunately, it is the same addictive quality of the drugs that make them good investments. And if I could corner the marlet on any of them, then I could make a lot of money. There was an antitrust lawsuit in the beginning of the 1900's involving the American tobacco company. 

 

Moreover, initiative and support to restrict the use of any of the drugs would sometimes come from industrialists who sought to control their production. One famous example might be Rockefeller's support of prohibitionsts during the prohibition of alcohol.

 

And the release of health information, deleterious or beneficial, would also be affected by the same industry leaders. The famous example might be the withholding of the deleterious effects of tobacco by the tobacco industry. And the flip side: there are health benefits to nicotine, but I, as an industrialist in another sector of the economy, would not want to espouse the health benefits of nicotine while I see my employees run out on their fifteen minute breaks to smoke cigarettes....

 

It's difficult to discern whether any altruism for people's health was in either drug use restrictions or the release of health information about the use of the drugs. And in some cases, as I pointed out, health was definitely not a concern as much as money had been.

 

People obviously feel their health is not being considered/covered adequately- these all may be moot points anyway. There was a national health insurance debate:smileywink:

 

 

Chad

 

 

 

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dulcinea3
Posts: 4,389
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Drug Legalization

Actually, marijuana, unlike alcohol and nicotine, is not physically addictive.  It is, however, psychologically addictive (or 'habituating').  I'm not so sure about hiding the beneficial properties of marijuana; I believe it was actually used for medicinal purposes (like cocaine was) prior to its criminalization.  I think that its ability to prevent glaucoma is generally well known even today, as well as its ability to settle the stomach and reduce nausea (hence its use by cancer patients, which is legal in some states, to control the effects of chemotherapy).

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Frequent Contributor
chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Drug Legalization


dulcinea3 wrote:

Actually, marijuana, unlike alcohol and nicotine, is not physically addictive.  It is, however, psychologically addictive (or 'habituating').  I'm not so sure about hiding the beneficial properties of marijuana; I believe it was actually used for medicinal purposes (like cocaine was) prior to its criminalization.  I think that its ability to prevent glaucoma is generally well known even today, as well as its ability to settle the stomach and reduce nausea (hence its use by cancer patients, which is legal in some states, to control the effects of chemotherapy).


Well, they're all medicinal and addictive to a certain degree. To what degree is often a matter of politics and not science....

 

 

Chad


 

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LAX_observer
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎06-09-2011
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Re: Drug Legalization

As a young adult I surprise most of my generation with my, now, staunch disapproval of legalization of any drug out there today, or tomorrow. Some reasons behind this a for the benefit of the larger community, tax dollars, less crowded jails and courtrooms, but the reality of the matter is that, without the government saying its a-ok as well, the youth of today already have droves of media in every form telling them its not only ok, but suggesting to try it. Yes, legalizing marijuana would put a major part of the control of the substance into the right hands, but seeing that industry from the inside, know that control wont be taken away from the people that it should be taken away from by legalizing it. Substance use and abuse is right up there with poverty and and obesity in this country as the reasons why everything is, excuse the phrase, going to pot.  Drug enforcement isn't getting done what needs to be done, but throwing in the towel and giving in to legalization will only make the problems we face worse. We need to take proactive steps to our nations many problems, not retroactive, politically correct ones. We need to come together now more than ever to snuff out the underbelly of society and work towards a better, brighter tomorrow

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LAX_observer
Posts: 34
Registered: ‎06-09-2011
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Re: Drug Legalization

Side note on the war on legalization: any health benefits that can come from marijuana, reducing nausea in chemotherapy patients, reducing anxiety in PTSD sufferers, can be extracted and held in a pill form virtually eradicating the need to smoke, or even deal with the stuff. Why aren't there more pharmaceutical giants out there working on these processes? With today's innovations, there is no reason not to take out the good in marijuana and manufacture that alone, we don't need to legalize it for legalization' sake, and we don't need to leave anyone suffering from this or that on their own either...

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chad
Posts: 1,477
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
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Re: Drug Legalization


LAX_observer wrote:

Side note on the war on legalization: any health benefits that can come from marijuana, reducing nausea in chemotherapy patients, reducing anxiety in PTSD sufferers, can be extracted and held in a pill form virtually eradicating the need to smoke, or even deal with the stuff. Why aren't there more pharmaceutical giants out there working on these processes? With today's innovations, there is no reason not to take out the good in marijuana and manufacture that alone, we don't need to legalize it for legalization' sake, and we don't need to leave anyone suffering from this or that on their own either...


 

"We don't need to legalize it for legalization' sake."- Exactly. People make money by selling marijaunna and so it is a "political" substance. The fact that States are now just beginning to legalize marijuanna for health reasons when the substance has been around and has been used for millienia is supect, to the say the very least....I wonder if there are cases where people were in need of the substance for health reasons, but were not able to use it because of its illegalization?

 

Some disapointing news, though, is that marijuanna and other substances are probably here to stay as long as we are. And some disappointing web reports state that there is evidence that cannabis had been used some 4000 years ago, perhaps for religious rituals-to think that some of the root causes for using them may have been around for 4 millenia!!!!!:smileysurprised: Also the reason why pharm companies have to be careful about what they're producing....

 

Chad