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chad
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Separation of Church and State

Here's a link about the latest case before the Supreme Court regarding the separation of church and state, which, for the most part, means that no appointed or elected officials can be church officials. Or, basically the church cannot appoint their own goverment officials.  But does it work the other way around? Can the state tell the church who they can appoint?.....

 

 http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/law/july-dec11/scotus_10-05.html

 

Chad

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chad
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Re: Separation of Church and State


 

chad wrote:

 

Here's a link about the latest case before the Supreme Court regarding the separation of church and state, which, for the most part, means that no appointed or elected officials can be church officials. Or, basically the church cannot appoint their own government officials.  But does it work the other way around? Can the state tell the church who they can appoint?.....

 

 http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/law/july-dec11/scotus_10-05.html

 

Chad


Just to add:

 

Well, it looks as if the decision hinges on the question: what is a minister? I thought it was interesting that a plea for equality was made to the state, but we find principles of equality in both the church and the state.

 

Chad  

 

 

 

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chad
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Re: Separation of Church and State

So, although we attempt to separate church and state in various ways, they are inseparable on this notion of equality that we share....

 

Chad 

 

PS- also pop on over to "A Lodging For The Night"- a short story by Louis Stevenson- just right for our times....

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Separation of Church and State: correction

[ Edited ]

No position in our government is allocated to a "church official"- this is one way in which church and state are separated in our country, and it may be the only way- sorry, it's always a little confusing.

 

Chad

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Re: Separation of Church and State: correction


chad wrote:

No position in our government is allocated to a "church official"- this is one way in which church and state are separated in our country, and it may be the only way- sorry, it's always a little confusing.

 

Chad


 

 

The governement and the church were more unified in history, but, in this country, we decided to separate from the church- and the degree of separation is still being argued in courts and whatever. One important way in which we are separated is what I mentioned above.

 

There are obvious "pluses" and "minuses" to separation of church and state: on the plus side- a stronger grip on tyrrany and "corruption" by decentralizing power (also no torture or spanish inquistions:smileyfrustrated:). On the minus side- a weaker "moral code"- religion is no longer backed by the state, with a few exceptions-but "In God We Trust" on our dollar bill dosen't cut the mustard sometimes for me, and probably others...lol:smileyvery-happy:

 

Chad

 

PS- these are also important "basics" to remember....

 

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Re: Separation of Church and State

[ Edited ]
Maybe not a correction to church and state separation, just some additions. Chivalry was also something I should mention-that is , the loss of over time. The star wars saga is about knighthood, chivalry, a code etc. , with the creation of the Jedi knight. The spike network is also airing the saga again for all those interested....damn Jar Jar sometimes, but he ends up pulling things together in the end every time.
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Re: Separation of Church and State

PS- people argue about the "why" church and state are separate. Again, no government position allocated to a particular religion or church. Chad
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Re: Separation of Church and State

There seemed to be a separation of church and state "animus" from the very beginning of the U.S. government- probably arising from some of the abuses of the early american "religious" colonies- where you might find yourself burning at a stake after being accused of being a witch. Or maybe it had something to do with the money printing of the catholic church. The protestants and the catholics have certainly had their share of political abuses- abuses which, I think, arose from the conflict between the " merchant" and the "state." In general, the merchant wants an open market, while the "state" seeks control over markets. Chad