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L_Monty
Posts: 900
Registered: ‎12-30-2008
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Suggestions for May

For May, both Jon and I thought it would be interesting (and a relief) to take a departure from the more sober recent fare and read Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers: The Story of Success. Gladwell's books are incredibly readable, funny and fun pop-sci., pop-soc. and pop-psych examinations of trends, demographics and thought processes, and in Outliers, he looks at how the unique formative experiences and support systems of successful people say more about their success than what the pat "feature story" portraits of their post-success profiles offer us.

However, that's only one book, and we'd like to hear your recommendations for what you think would make an interesting companion piece to read. Obviously, it doesn't have to be explicitly about the same subject, but if we can tie it thematically or conceptually, that'd be great.

Following the recommendation of another B&N mod who got good results from such a system, we thought what everyone could do is PM me with up to two (2) suggestions for a second book for May. Then we'll pick the two books that have either the most nominations or, failing that, the most conceptual overlap and put them up for a vote in another thread, after the PMs are tallied. Whichever one gets the most votes will be our second book for May.

Please get your nominations in to me by the end of Saturday, and I'll put up a vote thread for Sunday and Monday. Tuesday morning, we'll name the winner, and hopefully that will be enough time for everyone to get a copy by the beginning of May.

Note: the deadlines for nominations and votes might get pushed back a few days, depending on how much feedback we get.
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L_Monty
Posts: 900
Registered: ‎12-30-2008
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Re: Suggestions for May

As it turned out, actually, we got almost no feedback, which was disappointing for both of us. Only one poster wrote in, but the suggestion was really much better suited to another month. Since there was nothing else suggested to vote on, we agreed that doubling up on Gladwell, with his book The Tipping Point would be fun.

 

The choice seemed especially relevant since Utopian's recent posts about crime in New York City brought up an interesting discussion about race, poverty, new statistical analysis, the "broken windows" policy of policing, as well as the CompStat system of measuring enforcement, all of which are profiled in Gladwell's The Tipping Point.

 

I'll put up the standard "coming soon" monthly profile post within the next day or so.

 

Thanks.