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Choisya
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Re: The Climate Debate

I think all modern democracies face these dilemmas KathyS.  The UK may be 'advanced' in some matters but we are backward in others.  I remember Professor Bob Fanuzzi saying on one of the book club threads he was moderating (Walden, I think) that he thought that the western concept of democracy was coming to an end and that we would soon have to rethink how we should govern ourselves.  The mini breakdown in capitalism we have just seen may be an early indication of this.

 

On the subject of greed, it seems that the human species is greedy and perhaps we need to recognise this. In the past frugality was a virtue, nowadays it seems that uber-consumerism is. We are constantly being urged to spend more in order to help the economy but does that really help or hinder us in making a better world?.

 

Nowadays those in the developing world are not just 'given' aid, they are taught how to help themselves and how to do it without harming their communities or impoverishing their land.  Perhaps we need some lessons ourselves.   

 

 


KathyS wrote:

Choisya, I'm only speaking as one,  myself,  within millions of people.  I wish I had the answers.  I sometimes wish I had the fortitude and energy it takes,  to stand up,  once again, on  that box I called a platform, to go head to head, against people who think that the US, or the world, will stay the same.

 

It won't.  I have feelings, and it's just my feelings, that this next election will be a turning point for something better than what we've seen in the past.  I think people are seeing the need for change.  At least I hope this to be true.

 

Change from the usual complacency's that have worked their way into the minds of these people.  What does it take to change minds along these lines?  You are far more advanced, as a government, in your thinking, which makes me wonder what we've, as a government, and country,  have been thinking, all of these years of separation from what our original beliefs came from, from your country. 

 

We, as a nation are so confrontational, it makes me want to hide myself. As a nation, we've fought to say what we feel!  What we want to fight against, but  I think, to the point,  we've lost sight of what this country should stand for...  It should stand for us, the individual who wants what is best for not just ourselves, but for each other.  We've lost sight, I think, of that concept of Christianity, that this country was supposedly founded upon..  It's now to the extreme.

 

I don't understand it, and I think that most of these people are wanting everything handed to them, just as we give so much to other countries;  but after a while, do these countries really appreciate being handed these gifts, without working for them, or earning them, or seeing what they, themselves can do FOR themselves, to earn what these gifts mean? Our people, or this government,  are no better for this.

 

I don't have the answers.  I don't have the solutions.  I wish I did.  More people, including myself, should write and write, and write to their congress person, their representatives.  These people are representing us!  Force them to hear what we want, by writing to them!    We elect them!  That's the only answers I can give.


 

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Everyman
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Re: The Climate Debate

Ah, yes.  Anti-Americanism rears its ugly head here.   If the Americans believe it, it must be wrong. 

 

Time will tell, but I have no plans to move away from my waterfront home desite the UN claiming it will be underwater before long.

 


Choisya wrote:
What worries me more about this debate is that, once again, America is out on a limb and is disagreeing with the rest of the world.  As with Iraq.  As with the prolonged debate over the recent financial crisis when European governments took similar decisions overnight.  Isn't something wrong when a nation so consistently rows against the tide?   To use literary terms, doesn't it show hubris and mean that a nemesis is on the way, or will there be an anagnorisis?  

 

 

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Re: The Climate Debate

Hmmm.  Did you overlook the fact that the BBC article I posted was about an ENGLISH politician?  Scientific truth or falsity has nothing to do with national borders.  It's xenophobia to suggest otherwise. 

 


Choisya wrote:
What worries me more about this debate is that, once again, America is out on a limb and is disagreeing with the rest of the world.  As with Iraq.  As with the prolonged debate over the recent financial crisis when European governments took similar decisions overnight.  Isn't something wrong when a nation so consistently rows against the tide?   To use literary terms, doesn't it show hubris and mean that a nemesis is on the way, or will there be an anagnorisis?  

 

 

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Re: The Climate Debate

the toxic chemicals we daily pour into the oceans are probably doing far more harm to sea mammals and to people. 

 

The city of Victoria, right across the water from us, pours all is sewage untreated into the strait.   Which is totally illegal anywhere in this country, but is obviously okay in Canada.  I wish the Queen would straighten them up, but so far she hasn't. 

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Timbuktu1
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Re: The Climate Debate


Everyman wrote:

Ah, yes.  Anti-Americanism rears its ugly head here.   If the Americans believe it, it must be wrong. 

 

Time will tell, but I have no plans to move away from my waterfront home desite the UN claiming it will be underwater before long.

 


Choisya wrote:
What worries me more about this debate is that, once again, America is out on a limb and is disagreeing with the rest of the world.  As with Iraq.  As with the prolonged debate over the recent financial crisis when European governments took similar decisions overnight.  Isn't something wrong when a nation so consistently rows against the tide?   To use literary terms, doesn't it show hubris and mean that a nemesis is on the way, or will there be an anagnorisis?  

 

 


Choisya, aren't you proud of the English bulldog spirit that fought the Nazis while the rest of the world succumbed?  I think that acting independently is a point of pride.  Trying to be popular is something I taught my kids not  to worry about in junior high.  

 

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Laurel
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Re: The Climate Debate

Everything on The Onion is a joke, Deb.

debbook wrote:
I hope that article was a joke. Its so hard to tell these days.

Laurel wrote:

Now we have another problem on our hands:

 

US. Ice Cubes Melting At Alarming Rate


 


 

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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debbook
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Re: The Climate Debate

Glad to hear it:smileyvery-happy: But what am I to do with all my " Save The Ice Cubes " T-shirts " ?

Laurel wrote:
Everything on The Onion is a joke, Deb.

debbook wrote:
I hope that article was a joke. Its so hard to tell these days.

Laurel wrote:

Now we have another problem on our hands:

 

US. Ice Cubes Melting At Alarming Rate


 


A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
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KathyS
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Re: The Climate Debate

Deb, send them to Laurel! LOL

 

p.s. Laurel?:  What does "The Onion" mean?  Your head/brain?  The earth?  Whaaat?  :smileyhappy:


debbook wrote:
Glad to hear it:smileyvery-happy: But what am I to do with all my " Save The Ice Cubes " T-shirts " ?


Laurel wrote:
Everything on The Onion is a joke, Deb.


debbook wrote:
I hope that article was a joke. Its so hard to tell these days.

Laurel wrote:

Now we have another problem on our hands:

 

US. Ice Cubes Melting At Alarming Rate


 

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Choisya
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Re: The Climate Debate

LOL that's a relief - some folks here have recently begun putting ice in their drinks and I wouldn't want them to be deprived of this strange American habit so soon:smileyvery-happy:

 


KathyS wrote:

Deb, send them to Laurel! LOL

 

p.s. Laurel?:  What does "The Onion" mean?  Your head/brain?  The earth?  Whaaat?  :smileyhappy:


debbook wrote:
Glad to hear it:smileyvery-happy: But what am I to do with all my " Save The Ice Cubes " T-shirts " ?


Laurel wrote:
Everything on The Onion is a joke, Deb.


debbook wrote:
I hope that article was a joke. Its so hard to tell these days.

Laurel wrote:

Now we have another problem on our hands:

 

US. Ice Cubes Melting At Alarming Rate


 


 

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Choisya
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Re: The Climate Debate

[ Edited ]

Oops!

Message Edited by Choisya on 10-04-2008 10:33 PM
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Laurel
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Re: The Climate Debate

[ Edited ]

I have given this question long and careful consideration, and here is what I think.

 

I don't know.

 

Here are some possibilities I have come up with, though:

 

  1.  An onion looks like the head of a pinhead, which at one time was a pitiful creature without much "upstairs."  There are two pinhead sisters somewhere who sing a beautiful song together. The Wizard of Oz? The greatest Show on Earth? Another mystery.
  2. There used to be a custom of giving out imaginary onions and orchids--orchids to those who deserve special commendation and onions to the other sort.
  3. The most pronounce sound in onion is N--two of them. I have observed that N is a sign of negation in many languages--no, nyet, nein, non, -un, -in, nya-nya-nya-nya-na-na.
  4. Back in the 1960's and '70's young people were told that they needed to peel away all the layers of custom and convention from their lives in order to "find themselves." This went well until someone asked them what if they were like onions--if you keep peeling away and peeling away, you finally find that went you get to the center there is nothing there.
  5. An onion brings tears to one's eyes.
I have not done any research into the question, though, so I guess I'd better. Here's my research question: What do you think the onion stands for?


KathyS wrote:

Deb, send them to Laurel! LOL

 

p.s. Laurel?:  What does "The Onion" mean?  Your head/brain?  The earth?  Whaaat?  :smileyhappy:


debbook wrote:
Glad to hear it:smileyvery-happy: But what am I to do with all my " Save The Ice Cubes " T-shirts " ?


Laurel wrote:
Everything on The Onion is a joke, Deb.


debbook wrote:
I hope that article was a joke. Its so hard to tell these days.

Laurel wrote:

Now we have another problem on our hands:

 

US. Ice Cubes Melting At Alarming Rate


 


 

Message Edited by Laurel on 10-04-2008 07:33 PM
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Everyman
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Re: The Climate Debate

Why is is anti-American to state the facts? Americans are swimming against the tide..

 

It's not that simple.  There are multiple tides, even among English politicians and scientists.  You make it sound as thoug hthe world view is monolithic, but it is far from that.  

 

For example, just last Wednesday, Vaclav Klaus, President of the Czech Republic, gave a speech in which he noted that "it is important to demonstrate that the global warming story is not an issue belonging to the field of natural sciences only or mostly, even though Al Gore and his fellow-travelers pretend it is the case. It is again, as always in the past, the old, for many of us well-known debate: freedom and free markets vs. dirigism, political control and expansive and unstoppable government regulation of human behavior."

 

I cited early the article on your own Mark Lynas who contests the neo-religion of climate change.  

 

This paper on Challenging the Activists was issued first in London by the  Institute of Economic Affairs.

 

And these are just a few examples of the international disbelief in the Gore hypotheses.  

 

You may or may not agree with any of these.  But the suggestion that all the world is united behind one position and only the US is standing alone behind the opposite position is simply not true.   It is a canard  which only those who refuse to recognize the legitimate and broad international scientific disagreement  over the issue will parrot.  

 


Choisya wrote:

Why is is anti-American to state the facts? Americans are swimming against the tide. Maybe they will be proved right, maybe not.  I hope your home will be safe.  Bangladesh is not so lucky.

 

T - we only fought the Battle of Britain independently because we had to, not because we chose to!  Had Hitler not invaded all our European allies and had America come into the war sooner, we might not have had to lose so many people with bulldog spirits:smileysad:

 

I agree that independence is something to be prized but consistently going against public opinion in any walk of life is something which needs to be examined carefully because it may also show a lack of judgement. 

 

  

 


Timbuktu1 wrote:


Everyman wrote:

Ah, yes.  Anti-Americanism rears its ugly head here.   If the Americans believe it, it must be wrong. 

 

Time will tell, but I have no plans to move away from my waterfront home desite the UN claiming it will be underwater before long.

 


Choisya wrote:
What worries me more about this debate is that, once again, America is out on a limb and is disagreeing with the rest of the world.  As with Iraq.  As with the prolonged debate over the recent financial crisis when European governments took similar decisions overnight.  Isn't something wrong when a nation so consistently rows against the tide?   To use literary terms, doesn't it show hubris and mean that a nemesis is on the way, or will there be an anagnorisis?  

 

 


Choisya, aren't you proud of the English bulldog spirit that fought the Nazis while the rest of the world succumbed?  I think that acting independently is a point of pride.  Trying to be popular is something I taught my kids not  to worry about in junior high.  


Message Edited by Choisya on 10-04-2008 10:02 PM

 

 

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Choisya
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Re: The Climate Debate

[ Edited ]

Why is is anti-American to state the facts? Americans are swimming against the tide. Maybe they will be proved right, maybe not. In the meantime they invite criticism. I hope your home will be safe.  Bangladesh is not so lucky.

 

 

Far from being anti-American, I actually worry about the way America is perceived in the world because 'when America sneezes the world catches a cold'.  It is a rich and very powerful country and its policies and attitudes can affect the lives of everyone on the planet - as last week's financial crisis showed.  There have been several occasions on these boards where Americans have posted that they have encountered animosity when they travelled or lived abroad and I think that is a reason to worry because not all of your opponents can be wrong all of the time.  I also worry about the perception of my own country in the world, particularly the Islamic world. I am by no means a believer in 'my country, right or wrong'.  Both of our countries have lost the respect of the world in recent years.     

 

 

T - we only fought the Battle of Britain independently because we had to, not because we chose to!  Had Hitler not invaded all our European allies and had America come into the war sooner, we might not have had to lose so many people with bulldog spirits:smileysad:

 

 

I agree that independence is something to be prized but consistently going against public opinion in any walk of life is something which needs to be examined carefully because it may also show a lack of judgement. 

Message Edited by Choisya on 10-04-2008 11:17 PM
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Choisya
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Re: The Climate Debate

[ Edited ]

I wasn''t just thinking about global warming, nor Gore.  I have my sceptisms about that too although I think we have to look very carefully at who is funding those who speak out against doing nothing because there are an awful lot of vested interests riding on that POV.  Big business does not like change - it costs money. 

 

The concern about America is that it is the biggest consumer of world resources and one of its biggest polluters, although China will soon be overtaking you on that score:smileysad:  Surely you agree that wastefulness and pollution are bad things and should be controlled, global warming or no global warming? 

 

Incidentally, my eldest daughter is one of the English experts in this field, particularly with regard to sustainable construction methods.  It is to her MSc graduation I go next week - she has now commenced her PhD.   

 

 

 


Everyman wrote:

Why is is anti-American to state the facts? Americans are swimming against the tide..

 

It's not that simple.  There are multiple tides, even among English politicians and scientists.  You make it sound as thoug hthe world view is monolithic, but it is far from that.  

 

For example, just last Wednesday, Vaclav Klaus, President of the Czech Republic, gave a speech in which he noted that "it is important to demonstrate that the global warming story is not an issue belonging to the field of natural sciences only or mostly, even though Al Gore and his fellow-travelers pretend it is the case. It is again, as always in the past, the old, for many of us well-known debate: freedom and free markets vs. dirigism, political control and expansive and unstoppable government regulation of human behavior."

 

I cited early the article on your own Mark Lynas who contests the neo-religion of climate change.  

 

This paper on Challenging the Activists was issued first in London by the  Institute of Economic Affairs.

 

And these are just a few examples of the international disbelief in the Gore hypotheses.  

 

You may or may not agree with any of these.  But the suggestion that all the world is united behind one position and only the US is standing alone behind the opposite position is simply not true.   It is a canard  which only those who refuse to recognize the legitimate and broad international scientific disagreement  over the issue will parrot.  

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 10-04-2008 11:30 PM
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Choisya
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Re: The Climate Debate : Being reasonable.

[ Edited ]

BTW Al Gore is not widely quoted over here and I have not read him. We have a large number of (unsponsored) academics who advise the governments of the EEC and who were advising them long before he came on the scene.  The Institute of Economic Affairs, to which you gave a link, is a conservative think tank, somewhat to the right of the Conservative party itself so I would expect them to be more in line with American thinking.  They were once in line with McCarthyist thinking too and in the 80s advised Mrs Thatcher to follow the Chicago school of economics, led by Milton Friedman (one of the reasons she denationalised British Rail:smileyhappy:.). 

 

The reason that politicians from the Eastern Bloc, like Vadclav Klaus, are contesting climate change theories is that now their countries have entered the European Union they have to meet certain requirements regarding recycling, pollution etc etc. and they are having difficulty meeting that challenge because they are, as yet, much poorer than the rest of the Union. (They will receive financial help.)  The developed nations in the European Union are all signed up to policies which will (hopefully) alleviate climate change and it is perhaps these nations, which are more on a par with American socially and economically, that you should be studying.  Because of its former domination by the Communist Party, the Eastern bloc has swung to the right and is not (yet) in line with social-democratic thinking so you will find their views more on a par with the Republican Party (which may suit you of course - I am just pointing out the differences between Eastern and Western European thinking, not criticising any political belief).

 

No, the world view is not monolithic - it never is - but I think you will find that the governments of the majority of the developed nations have similar views about climate change and are taking similar (reasonable) steps to avoid further polluting our planet.  Certainly that is the case in the large bloc of Western European nations and Scandinavia and in the more developed countries of Asia, like India.    

 

I agree with Mark Lynas that there is a activist cult surrounding this problem and my daughter's specialist University in Wales produced not a few of them, much to her despair.  But there are other more sensible voices who are warning us of the problems and advising of reasonable ways forward.  For my part, I do not so much listen to 'experts' (or my daughter!) as look around me at the pollution and waste that I see.  We all know that toxic chemicals are being used on land and in the oceans. We all know that all of our old cars, fridges, washers, dryers etc etc etc are going into landfill sites where their chemicals will also be released and where they will not rot for many many years.  We all know that many of us waste food or eat too much and buy fripperies which we do not need.  We all know that transporting very young animals across continents so that people can eat veal instead of beef is unethical and uneccessary.  We all know that our seas are overfished and that milliions are thrown back dead into the oceans. I know that if I buy strawberries from Spain I am contributing to the amount of freight traffic which is polluting our towns and villages, so I desist and wait for the British strawberry season.  It is these obvious excesses which I would like to see everyone reduce and then maybe the global warming 'activists' will stop being so evangelical about lesser things and stop trying to make our lives a frugal misery.        

 

  


Everyman wrote:

 

 

Why is is anti-American to state the facts? Americans are swimming against the tide..

 

It's not that simple.  There are multiple tides, even among English politicians and scientists.  You make it sound as thoug hthe world view is monolithic, but it is far from that.  

 

For example, just last Wednesday, Vaclav Klaus, President of the Czech Republic, gave a speech in which he noted that "it is important to demonstrate that the global warming story is not an issue belonging to the field of natural sciences only or mostly, even though Al Gore and his fellow-travelers pretend it is the case. It is again, as always in the past, the old, for many of us well-known debate: freedom and free markets vs. dirigism, political control and expansive and unstoppable government regulation of human behavior."

 

I cited early the article on your own Mark Lynas who contests the neo-religion of climate change.  

 

This paper on Challenging the Activists was issued first in London by the  Institute of Economic Affairs.

 

And these are just a few examples of the international disbelief in the Gore hypotheses.  

 

You may or may not agree with any of these.  But the suggestion that all the world is united behind one position and only the US is standing alone behind the opposite position is simply not true.   It is a canard  which only those who refuse to recognize the legitimate and broad international scientific disagreement  over the issue will parrot.  

 

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 10-05-2008 06:16 AM
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Choisya
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Re: The Climate Debate : World Public Opinion

This is a useful American academic website which monitors world public opinion.  There are interesting results for global warming and for world opinion on America, which we have touched upon here.  Their network 'consists of research centres in 25 countries across all of the major continents', which is pretty broad and better than, say, surveys of the G8 countries which are just the 'movers and shakers' but which are often the given sources of 'world' opinion.  
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Re: The Climate Debate

Global warming is a big debate among scientists, no clear answers, to date.... but I do believe we have to do everything we can to prevent pollutants into the air, and on the earth,  no matter what.

 

 

I agree with you Kathy. Regardless of the causes, even if all the changes are natural part of the earth's cycle, there is no reason to treat our planet like a junkyard.

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The Onion/Climate Debate

Laurel,

Thank you for your 'long and careful consideration' of my question.  I've also thought long and hard, and I think we should just blame everything on the Bosa Nova!  

 

The poor onion is getting a bum 'wrap'.  The psychological damage to it will soon be irreparable.  I love the 'sweet' onions - they give so much, and ask so little in return, except for a few tears from time to time.  Are they not worth it?

 

:smileyhappy:

Kathy


Laurel wrote:

I have given this question long and careful consideration, and here is what I think.

 

I don't know.

 

Here are some possibilities I have come up with, though:

 

  1.  An onion looks like the head of a pinhead, which at one time was a pitiful creature without much "upstairs."  There are two pinhead sisters somewhere who sing a beautiful song together. The Wizard of Oz? The greatest Show on Earth? Another mystery.
  2. There used to be a custom of giving out imaginary onions and orchids--orchids to those who deserve special commendation and onions to the other sort.
  3. The most pronounce sound in onion is N--two of them. I have observed that N is a sign of negation in many languages--no, nyet, nein, non, -un, -in, nya-nya-nya-nya-na-na.
  4. Back in the 1960's and '70's young people were told that they needed to peel away all the layers of custom and convention from their lives in order to "find themselves." This went well until someone asked them what if they were like onions--if you keep peeling away and peeling away, you finally find that went you get to the center there is nothing there.
  5. An onion brings tears to one's eyes.

I have not done any research into the question, though, so I guess I'd better. Here's my research question: What do you think the onion stands for?


KathyS wrote:

Deb, send them to Laurel! LOL

 

p.s. Laurel?:  What does "The Onion" mean?  Your head/brain?  The earth?  Whaaat?  :smileyhappy:


debbook wrote:
Glad to hear it:smileyvery-happy: But what am I to do with all my " Save The Ice Cubes " T-shirts " ?


Laurel wrote:
Everything on The Onion is a joke, Deb.


debbook wrote:
I hope that article was a joke. Its so hard to tell these days.

Laurel wrote:

Now we have another problem on our hands:

 

US. Ice Cubes Melting At Alarming Rate


 

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Laurel
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Re: The Onion/Climate Debate

That reminds me of one Possibility I forgot to bring up:

 

6. The Onion headquarters are in either Vidalia, Oregon or Walla Walla, Washington. Or perhaps both places, since both know how to think up good names. I don't know what Vidalia means, but Walla is Nez Perce or Flathead (I forget which) for 'water.' Walla Walla means 'a lot of water.' Which could be bad news for ice cubes, depending on the climate. I'm not making this up, either.

 As for your suggestion, are you sure you don't mean samba?


KathyS wrote:

Laurel,

Thank you for your 'long and careful consideration' of my question.  I've also thought long and hard, and I think we should just blame everything on the Bosa Nova!  

 

The poor onion is getting a bum 'wrap'.  The psychological damage to it will soon be irreparable.  I love the 'sweet' onions - they give so much, and ask so little in return, except for a few tears from time to time.  Are they not worth it?

 

:smileyhappy:

Kathy


Laurel wrote:

I have given this question long and careful consideration, and here is what I think.

 

I don't know.

 

Here are some possibilities I have come up with, though:

 

  1.  An onion looks like the head of a pinhead, which at one time was a pitiful creature without much "upstairs."  There are two pinhead sisters somewhere who sing a beautiful song together. The Wizard of Oz? The greatest Show on Earth? Another mystery.
  2. There used to be a custom of giving out imaginary onions and orchids--orchids to those who deserve special commendation and onions to the other sort.
  3. The most pronounce sound in onion is N--two of them. I have observed that N is a sign of negation in many languages--no, nyet, nein, non, -un, -in, nya-nya-nya-nya-na-na.
  4. Back in the 1960's and '70's young people were told that they needed to peel away all the layers of custom and convention from their lives in order to "find themselves." This went well until someone asked them what if they were like onions--if you keep peeling away and peeling away, you finally find that went you get to the center there is nothing there.
  5. An onion brings tears to one's eyes.

I have not done any research into the question, though, so I guess I'd better. Here's my research question: What do you think the onion stands for?


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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KathyS
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Re: The Onion/Climate Debate


Laurel wrote:

That reminds me of one Possibility I forgot to bring up:

6. The Onion headquarters are in either Vidalia, Oregon or Walla Walla, Washington. Or perhaps both places, since both know how to think up good names. I don't know what Vidalia means, but Walla is Nez Perce or Flathead (I forget which) for 'water.' Walla Walla means 'a lot of water.' Which could be bad news for ice cubes, depending on the climate. I'm not making this up, either.

 As for your suggestion, are you sure you don't mean samba?


 

"No, no, 'Blame It On The Bossa Nova'"  :smileyhappy:

 

That's interesting about the water... I've noticed, since I live in a pretty dry area, that when the humidity level goes up, my ice cubes melt faster, and the glass leaves a ton of condinsation on the outside.  I bet if we captured that condinsation, we could freeze it, and trick it back into being an ice cube, again!  Or we could lick our glass, and get our daily supply of water, along with that soda, or iced tea!  I think we really need to think about conserving all of our natural resourses...What do you think?  Think I hit on something, here?

 

The Vidalia Onion capital is in Vidalia, Georgia, but I have no idea what 'Vidalia' means.    I bet that town smells almost as good as the garlic capital of Calif...in Gilroy!  I wouldn't want to be spending the night there...!  I think Gilroy already did that!

 

I see more and more sweet onions from Texas, and cheaper these days, the Texas Sweet. 

 

(This is a disclaimer - all content of this subject has no reflection on current admisitration, and the economic situation - just the climate changes)