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Jon_B
Posts: 1,893
Registered: ‎07-15-2008
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Re: "Criminal Training Experiences"

Sorry to nitpick but I wouldn't say that Doom "copied" Wolfenstein3D exactly since they were made by the same team.  More like Doom is a further development of the technology that first appeared in Wolf3D.

 

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: "Criminal Training Experiences"


Jon_B wrote:

Sorry to nitpick but I wouldn't say that Doom "copied" Wolfenstein3D exactly since they were made by the same team.  More like Doom is a further development of the technology that first appeared in Wolf3D.

 

 


(chuckle) And (shake head) a small slice of the gamer wild west era

 

Wolfenstien originated with a small group of programmers decided blue market (preinternet era backdoor market to consumers direct) a mix of their graduate product and this thing they'd been working on during their free time. After a year or so, a company bought the rights to the game and mass marketed it. The owning company shut out all but one of the original programmers, him they gave a job. 2 of the programmers went into other fields. 3 were so pissed they decided to start their own game company "id"whose first product to market was Doom. Legally at the time they did not have the right to the relevant code (even the one's they personally wrote). This started a small legal battle between the University where and whose equipment was used as the code was written, the company that bought the rights to the code when they bought Wolfenstien, and id. 

Id won, basically on the basis that those programmers had the right to further develop their earlier works and profit from it. And a small bit of karma when 6 years later id bought the company that had originally shut them out. 

 

But yeah Doom copied Wolfenstien. A small update in the graphic processor, a change in plot, and a different color scheme; is all the difference there is. 

 

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Choisya
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Re: "Criminal Training Experiences"

Gosh, there is a lot of off-topic derailment going on here - do we need a Horror Movies Analysis thread?:smileysurprised:  
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Jon_B
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Re: "Criminal Training Experiences"

[ Edited ]

Choisya -We're talking about games not movies but you're right, this doesn't really belong here and we should probably move this conversation over to Arts & Entertainment

 

 


(Tiggerbear wrote) But yeah Doom copied Wolfenstien. A small update in the graphic processor, a change in plot, and a different color scheme; is all the difference there is.

 

Thanks for that history, I didn't know all that.  Still I'd say there is more to it than that, Doom has a much more complicated level design (i.e. variable height floors and ceiling, open areas, non-rectangular rooms, water, lighting, etc.) and I'm pretty sure it also had multiplayer capabalities over a modem, or maybe that was the sequel.   

Message Edited by Jon_B on 07-28-2009 06:34 AM
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TiggerBear
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Re: "Criminal Training Experiences"


Jon_B wrote:

Choisya -We're talking about games not movies but you're right, this doesn't really belong here and we should probably move this conversation over to Arts & Entertainment

 

 


(Tiggerbear wrote) But yeah Doom copied Wolfenstien. A small update in the graphic processor, a change in plot, and a different color scheme; is all the difference there is.

 

Thanks for that history, I didn't know all that.  Still I'd say there is more to it than that, Doom has a much more complicated level design (i.e. variable height floors and ceiling, open areas, non-rectangular rooms, water, lighting, etc.) and I'm pretty sure it also had multiplayer capabalities over a modem, or maybe that was the sequel.   

Message Edited by Jon_B on 07-28-2009 06:34 AM

Indeed you are thinking of DoomII. Almost 4 years later than the original. Much better game, and so far the most popular of the series. DoomIII was almost as bad as the movie, it just takes twice as long to play through.