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Choisya
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars

Perhaps the 'feminism' and 'war casualties' conversation can carry on in the Community Room?

 

 

 

This article by Philip Bennett of the Washington Post mentions a number of books on the Iraq war, including The Forever War and one by an Iraqi author, The Night Draws Near, which looks an interesting read from a different perspective.  He also makes the comment: 'If seduction was a theme of the Vietnam tagedy, in Iraq it seems to be replaced by repugnance, with an acrid distaste seeping into encounters between Americans and Iraqis.' and I think the 'Blonde woman for sale' was an illustration of this.  This repugnance probably arose because this war was launched in the mistaken belief that Saddam Hussein  had WMD and links with Al Queda/Bin Laden, so American soldiers have presumably been under the impression that they were fighting a nation which was responsible for the killing of their compatriots on 9/11. 

 

   

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Peppermill
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars

[ Edited ]

 Choisya wrote. This article by Philip Bennett of the Washington Post mentions a number of books on the Iraq war, including The Forever War and one by an Iraqi author, The Night Draws Near, which looks an interesting read from a different perspective.  He also makes the comment: 'If seduction was a theme of the Vietnam tagedy, in Iraq it seems to be replaced by repugnance, with an acrid distaste seeping into encounters between Americans and Iraqis.' and I think the 'Blonde woman for sale' was an illustration of this.  This repugnance probably arose because this war was launched in the mistaken belief that Saddam Hussein  had WMD and links with Al Queda/Bin Laden, so American soldiers have presumably been under the impression that they were fighting a nation which was responsible for the killing of their compatriots on 9/11.

Bold added

 

I'm not certain our soldiers were quite that naive about the Iraqi War.  There has been a lot of cynicism here about why we were in Iraq.

Message Edited by Peppermill on 03-17-2009 12:27 PM
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Choisya
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars

[ Edited ]

I am not sure that the cynicism was there amongst the military at the beginning of the war P, either in the US or the UK.  My understanding was that troops (yours and ours) were 'gee-d up'  by senior officers making these links to Al Queda and 9/11. Reports like this and this were common several years ago and they must surely have affected the military.

 

But don't let us get bogged down in a discussion of the war, having strayed through feminism into it and far far away from the book Monty originally posted for us to discuss, The Forever War.:smileyhappy:

 

Perhaps Monty could let us know what Filkins' impression was of what the soldiers thought they were fighting for at the beginning of the war?

 

 

 

 

 


Peppermill wrote:

 Choisya wrote. This article by Philip Bennett of the Washington Post mentions a number of books on the Iraq war, including The Forever War and one by an Iraqi author, The Night Draws Near, which looks an interesting read from a different perspective.  He also makes the comment: 'If seduction was a theme of the Vietnam tagedy, in Iraq it seems to be replaced by repugnance, with an acrid distaste seeping into encounters between Americans and Iraqis.' and I think the 'Blonde woman for sale' was an illustration of this.  This repugnance probably arose because this war was launched in the mistaken belief that Saddam Hussein  had WMD and links with Al Queda/Bin Laden, so American soldiers have presumably been under the impression that they were fighting a nation which was responsible for the killing of their compatriots on 9/11.

Bold added

 

I'm not certain our soldiers were quite that naive about the Iraqi War.  There has been a lot of cynicism here about why we were in Iraq.

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 03-17-2009 03:43 PM
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thewanderingjew
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

[ Edited ]

Sorry that this post is out of "time and space" but I just found it and I wanted to comment. 

I am an "old" woman, and I applaud you TB. My daughter is a stay at home mom, housewife, too, and loves it. It is by choice. You have to make compromises to do it but she believes it is worth it and so do I. The proof is in the pudding. Her children, so far, are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved. They are not being raised by people who treat them like potted plants.

twj


TiggerBear wrote:

...edited by twj... Fortunately my generation watching the massively unhappy career women ahead of them has been gaining the sense that kind of life isn't nessisary. That there is a choice of whether or not they want to be a house wife, a career woman, or do both in their life time. The ugly looks I get when I tell other women I'm a housewife are getting less and less. But when I do it's from older women every single time. My generation has rejected the thought that being a sexy female is improper. I'm not old enough that being a feminist it's nessisary to hate men. Those before though...
 
Choisya wrote:

Aren't you being rather ageist here TB?  My feminist daughter would laugh at the idea of you thinking I am an older feminist!  My argument here is not about any feminist principles, it is about retaining ones dignity as a female.  It is the same argument I would use to the young 'ladettes' who ape the worst in men by getting drunk every Saturday night and falling about all over the streets. 

 

I never stopped acting sexily and I had two husbands and a couple of long term lovers to prove it:smileyvery-happy:

 

 





 


 

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 05:02 PM
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TiggerBear
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"


thewanderingjew wrote:

I am an "old" woman, and I applaud you TB. My daughter is a stay at home mom, housewife, too, and loves it. It is by choice. You have to make compromises to do it but she believes it is worth it and so do I. The proof is in the pudding. Her children, so far, are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved. They are not being raised by people who treat them like potted plants.

twj




Thank you. Yes the compromises are worth it. My inlaws daily lives benifit. And the kid (or kids) we're working on, will never be treated like a house plant or televison acessory. 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars


Choisya wrote:

 

But don't let us get bogged down in a discussion of the war, having strayed through feminism into it and far far away from the book Monty originally posted for us to discuss, The Forever War.:smileyhappy:

 

Perhaps Monty could let us know what Filkins' impression was of what the soldiers thought they were fighting for at the beginning of the war?

 

 




  I'm curious too. I've talked with solgers visiting home, but their repsponced seem colored by the knowlege that in so many days they'll be back in the thick of it.

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L_Monty
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars


Choisya wrote:
But don't let us get bogged down in a discussion of the war, having strayed through feminism into it and far far away from the book Monty originally posted for us to discuss, The Forever War.:smileyhappy:

 

 

Perhaps Monty could let us know what Filkins' impression was of what the soldiers thought they were fighting for at the beginning of the war?



Filkins' isn't really a "policy" book, and there seems to be a kind of resignation in it that, since we're in the war anyway, the wherefores are sort of an irrelevancy now. His book doesn't get into a lot of big-picture stuff, instead going from scene to scene and person to person, high and low, important and not, to create a kind of mosaic of what it is to live the war. In this sense, it's as much correspondence as memoir. But I think it's thematically effective because instead of looking from the top and saying, "It's confusing!" it takes you into the confusion and sort of says, "Now try making sense of it." What I'm saying is that it doesn't really answer your question, because it isn't trying to. Of the books I've read on the Iraq war, I think Thomas Ricks' Fiasco would give you a better picture of troop attitudes and response on entering the war and then on each major change. But that's not to say it's the best book for that purpose. Perhaps someone else has a better recommendation.
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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars

[ Edited ]

Regarding the incident with the blonde soldier, often policewomen go undercover, behaving in ways or dressing in ways they would not normally, in order to capture suspected criminals or known criminals in sting operations.

I think they are heroic figures. They deserve our praise, not our ridicule and those that may find it demeaning, may not fully understand the higher purpose that they serve or why the orders were given, even when given by men.

Serving your country and your countrymen/women in whatever way is necessary to bring about success, is true patriotism. Kudos to them.

twj

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 06:36 PM
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TiggerBear
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars


thewanderingjew wrote:

Regarding the incident with the blonde soldier, often policewomen go undercover, behaving in ways or dressing in ways they would not normally, in order to capture suspected criminals or known criminals in sting operations.

I think they are heroic figures. They deserve our praise, not our ridicule and those that may find it demeaning, may not fully understand the higher purpose that they serve or why the orders were given, even when given by men.

Serving your country and your countrymen/women in whatever way is necessary to bring about success, is true patriotism. Kudos to them.

twj

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 06:36 PM

An excellent point. Do we look down on undercover activities of police, intellegence agencies, ect.. if while undercover they behave in way we normally might look down on? It's more than a little self sacrificing of them.

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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars

This is fascinating, twj.  I just had exactly the same thought and came here to post it and found that you had said much the same thing.

 

I would love to hear directly from those who think that the "blonde for sale" episode was degrading.  Do you think that for a female police officer to dress up as a prostitute and negotiate to provide sex for money with -- I can use no other word than perverts -- is degrading to that police officer?   Because in order to make a charge of prostitution stick, they have to negotitate an actual sale promising to provide sex for money. 

 

Is that degrading to the police officer?  Should this tactic be eliminated and never used?

 

And does it make a difference whether the officer volunteers for duty or is ordered by their superiors to undertake that role for the sting?

 

And -- sorry, Ryan, but I have to ask this -- do you apply the same principle to a male officer hanging around gay bars offering sex for money to other men?   If not, why not? 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Regarding the incident with the blonde soldier, often policewomen go undercover, behaving in ways or dressing in ways they would not normally, in order to capture suspected criminals or known criminals in sting operations.

I think they are heroic figures. They deserve our praise, not our ridicule and those that may find it demeaning, may not fully understand the higher purpose that they serve or why the orders were given, even when given by men.

Serving your country and your countrymen/women in whatever way is necessary to bring about success, is true patriotism. Kudos to them.

twj

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 06:36 PM

 

 

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Peppermill
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

Sorry that this post is out of "time and space" but I just found it and I wanted to comment. 

I am an "old" woman, and I applaud you TB. My daughter is a stay at home mom, housewife, too, and loves it. It is by choice. You have to make compromises to do it but she believes it is worth it and so do I. The proof is in the pudding. Her children, so far, are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved. They are not being raised by people who treat them like potted plants.

twj

 


TWJ -- I hope we are not to presume that having a stay-at-home mom is a necessary nor a sufficient condition for raising children who are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved, even though it can be a wonderful condition for a family and home in many cases.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Choisya
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

I do not think that it is only stay-at-home Mums who raise 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved'.    There are thousands of such children raised by working mums, like my own 18 year old grand-daughter who was raised by my eldest daughter who has worked since my grand-daughter  was six months old. She also has a number of career-women friends who have raised similar 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved children'.   It depends more on the respective parents and the quality of child care than on whether mums stay at home or not.  My grand-daughter had an excellent, professional carer who was much beloved by all the children she looked after.   During the war all women in the UK with children of school age had to work for the 'war effort' and my generation seems to have come out of it quite well on the behaviour front too.  

 

Some women make better parents because they go to work, some make better parents if they stay at home.  There is no 'holier than thou' right or wrong about this.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Sorry that this post is out of "time and space" but I just found it and I wanted to comment. 

I am an "old" woman, and I applaud you TB. My daughter is a stay at home mom, housewife, too, and loves it. It is by choice. You have to make compromises to do it but she believes it is worth it and so do I. The proof is in the pudding. Her children, so far, are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved. They are not being raised by people who treat them like potted plants.

twj


TiggerBear wrote:

...edited by twj... Fortunately my generation watching the massively unhappy career women ahead of them has been gaining the sense that kind of life isn't nessisary. That there is a choice of whether or not they want to be a house wife, a career woman, or do both in their life time. The ugly looks I get when I tell other women I'm a housewife are getting less and less. But when I do it's from older women every single time. My generation has rejected the thought that being a sexy female is improper. I'm not old enough that being a feminist it's nessisary to hate men. Those before though...
 
Choisya wrote:

Aren't you being rather ageist here TB?  My feminist daughter would laugh at the idea of you thinking I am an older feminist!  My argument here is not about any feminist principles, it is about retaining ones dignity as a female.  It is the same argument I would use to the young 'ladettes' who ape the worst in men by getting drunk every Saturday night and falling about all over the streets. 

 

I never stopped acting sexily and I had two husbands and a couple of long term lovers to prove it:smileyvery-happy:

 

 





 


 

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 05:02 PM

 

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Everyman
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

During the war all women in the UK with children of school age had to work for the 'war effort' and my generation seems to have come out of it quite well on the behaviour front too.  

 

And yet in other posts, as I recall, you have described yourself in terms quite other than  "well-mannered and well-behaved'."  I fact, you have taken a bit of pride in reporting your involvement in some not so well mannered protests and activities.  :smileywink:

 


Choisya wrote:

I do not think that it is only stay-at-home Mums who raise 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved'.    There are thousands of such children raised by working mums, like my own 18 year old grand-daughter who was raised by my eldest daughter who has worked since my grand-daughter  was six months old. She also has a number of career-women friends who have raised similar 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved children'.   It depends more on the respective parents and the quality of child care than on whether mums stay at home or not.  My grand-daughter had an excellent, professional carer who was much beloved by all the children she looked after.   During the war all women in the UK with children of school age had to work for the 'war effort' and my generation seems to have come out of it quite well on the behaviour front too.  

 

Some women make better parents because they go to work, some make better parents if they stay at home.  There is no 'holier than thou' right or wrong about this.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Sorry that this post is out of "time and space" but I just found it and I wanted to comment. 

I am an "old" woman, and I applaud you TB. My daughter is a stay at home mom, housewife, too, and loves it. It is by choice. You have to make compromises to do it but she believes it is worth it and so do I. The proof is in the pudding. Her children, so far, are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved. They are not being raised by people who treat them like potted plants.

twj


TiggerBear wrote:

...edited by twj... Fortunately my generation watching the massively unhappy career women ahead of them has been gaining the sense that kind of life isn't nessisary. That there is a choice of whether or not they want to be a house wife, a career woman, or do both in their life time. The ugly looks I get when I tell other women I'm a housewife are getting less and less. But when I do it's from older women every single time. My generation has rejected the thought that being a sexy female is improper. I'm not old enough that being a feminist it's nessisary to hate men. Those before though...
 
Choisya wrote:

Aren't you being rather ageist here TB?  My feminist daughter would laugh at the idea of you thinking I am an older feminist!  My argument here is not about any feminist principles, it is about retaining ones dignity as a female.  It is the same argument I would use to the young 'ladettes' who ape the worst in men by getting drunk every Saturday night and falling about all over the streets. 

 

I never stopped acting sexily and I had two husbands and a couple of long term lovers to prove it:smileyvery-happy:

 

 





 


 

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 05:02 PM

 


 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Everyman
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

Now that you're active posting for the day, Choisya, I would really like to know how yo respond to the questions raised here about whether policewomen who pretend to sell their bodies for money in prostitute stings are degrading themselves and reducing their future authority as police officers. 
_______________
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Choisya
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Re: Back to Forever War & Ghost Wars

No ridicule has been expressed here.  However, if policemen, soldiers or anyone else do wrong or unlawful things then they must be criticised, just as everyone else is criticised.  They are not saints, they are just ordinary men and women such as you or I.   Just because someone has chosen to serve in the armed forces or the police does not automatically make them a better person, there are just as many horrid people in these professions as there are in other walks of life as the despicable events at Abu Graib prison showed us.  As the many books about war that have been written show, there are many mistakes made in war, whatever the 'higher purpose' is supposed to be at the time.  Armies need to be kept under surveillance just as much as governments do, perhaps more so considering the awesome 'firepower' they have at their disposal.       

 

 

   

 

 


TiggerBear wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

Regarding the incident with the blonde soldier, often policewomen go undercover, behaving in ways or dressing in ways they would not normally, in order to capture suspected criminals or known criminals in sting operations.

I think they are heroic figures. They deserve our praise, not our ridicule and those that may find it demeaning, may not fully understand the higher purpose that they serve or why the orders were given, even when given by men.

Serving your country and your countrymen/women in whatever way is necessary to bring about success, is true patriotism. Kudos to them.

twj

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 06:36 PM

An excellent point. Do we look down on undercover activities of police, intellegence agencies, ect.. if while undercover they behave in way we normally might look down on? It's more than a little self sacrificing of them.


 

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Choisya
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

Whatever my activities, Everyman, I have always been well mannered and well behaved.  Being a political activist, going on rallies etc does not mean that you are ill behaved, even though others around you may be.  I do not swear or use any kind of bad language. I rarely raise my voice, I have never been involved in a physical fight, I have never thrown things, never handled a gun or a knife or any other kind of weapon.  And I go out of my way to be courteous, even under provocation, when I often become icily polite.    

 

 


Everyman wrote:
During the war all women in the UK with children of school age had to work for the 'war effort' and my generation seems to have come out of it quite well on the behaviour front too.  

 

And yet in other posts, as I recall, you have described yourself in terms quite other than  "well-mannered and well-behaved'."  I fact, you have taken a bit of pride in reporting your involvement in some not so well mannered protests and activities.  :smileywink:

 


Choisya wrote:

I do not think that it is only stay-at-home Mums who raise 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved'.    There are thousands of such children raised by working mums, like my own 18 year old grand-daughter who was raised by my eldest daughter who has worked since my grand-daughter  was six months old. She also has a number of career-women friends who have raised similar 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved children'.   It depends more on the respective parents and the quality of child care than on whether mums stay at home or not.  My grand-daughter had an excellent, professional carer who was much beloved by all the children she looked after.   During the war all women in the UK with children of school age had to work for the 'war effort' and my generation seems to have come out of it quite well on the behaviour front too.  

 

Some women make better parents because they go to work, some make better parents if they stay at home.  There is no 'holier than thou' right or wrong about this.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Sorry that this post is out of "time and space" but I just found it and I wanted to comment. 

I am an "old" woman, and I applaud you TB. My daughter is a stay at home mom, housewife, too, and loves it. It is by choice. You have to make compromises to do it but she believes it is worth it and so do I. The proof is in the pudding. Her children, so far, are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved. They are not being raised by people who treat them like potted plants.

twj


TiggerBear wrote:

...edited by twj... Fortunately my generation watching the massively unhappy career women ahead of them has been gaining the sense that kind of life isn't nessisary. That there is a choice of whether or not they want to be a house wife, a career woman, or do both in their life time. The ugly looks I get when I tell other women I'm a housewife are getting less and less. But when I do it's from older women every single time. My generation has rejected the thought that being a sexy female is improper. I'm not old enough that being a feminist it's nessisary to hate men. Those before though...
 
Choisya wrote:

Aren't you being rather ageist here TB?  My feminist daughter would laugh at the idea of you thinking I am an older feminist!  My argument here is not about any feminist principles, it is about retaining ones dignity as a female.  It is the same argument I would use to the young 'ladettes' who ape the worst in men by getting drunk every Saturday night and falling about all over the streets. 

 

I never stopped acting sexily and I had two husbands and a couple of long term lovers to prove it:smileyvery-happy:

 

 





 


 

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 05:02 PM

 


 

 


 

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

Hmmm.  A well mannered and well behaved rebel.  That's a new one for me.

 


Choisya wrote:

Whatever my activities, Everyman, I have always been well mannered and well behaved.  Being a political activist, going on rallies etc does not mean that you are ill behaved, even though others around you may be.  I do not swear or use any kind of bad language. I rarely raise my voice, I have never been involved in a physical fight, I have never thrown things, never handled a gun or a knife or any other kind of weapon.  And I go out of my way to be courteous, even under provocation, when I often become icily polite.    

 

 


Everyman wrote:
During the war all women in the UK with children of school age had to work for the 'war effort' and my generation seems to have come out of it quite well on the behaviour front too.  

 

And yet in other posts, as I recall, you have described yourself in terms quite other than  "well-mannered and well-behaved'."  I fact, you have taken a bit of pride in reporting your involvement in some not so well mannered protests and activities.  :smileywink:

 


Choisya wrote:

I do not think that it is only stay-at-home Mums who raise 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved'.    There are thousands of such children raised by working mums, like my own 18 year old grand-daughter who was raised by my eldest daughter who has worked since my grand-daughter  was six months old. She also has a number of career-women friends who have raised similar 'delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved children'.   It depends more on the respective parents and the quality of child care than on whether mums stay at home or not.  My grand-daughter had an excellent, professional carer who was much beloved by all the children she looked after.   During the war all women in the UK with children of school age had to work for the 'war effort' and my generation seems to have come out of it quite well on the behaviour front too.  

 

Some women make better parents because they go to work, some make better parents if they stay at home.  There is no 'holier than thou' right or wrong about this.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


thewanderingjew wrote:

Sorry that this post is out of "time and space" but I just found it and I wanted to comment. 

I am an "old" woman, and I applaud you TB. My daughter is a stay at home mom, housewife, too, and loves it. It is by choice. You have to make compromises to do it but she believes it is worth it and so do I. The proof is in the pudding. Her children, so far, are delightful, well-educated, well-mannered and well-behaved. They are not being raised by people who treat them like potted plants.

twj


TiggerBear wrote:

...edited by twj... Fortunately my generation watching the massively unhappy career women ahead of them has been gaining the sense that kind of life isn't nessisary. That there is a choice of whether or not they want to be a house wife, a career woman, or do both in their life time. The ugly looks I get when I tell other women I'm a housewife are getting less and less. But when I do it's from older women every single time. My generation has rejected the thought that being a sexy female is improper. I'm not old enough that being a feminist it's nessisary to hate men. Those before though...
 
Choisya wrote:

Aren't you being rather ageist here TB?  My feminist daughter would laugh at the idea of you thinking I am an older feminist!  My argument here is not about any feminist principles, it is about retaining ones dignity as a female.  It is the same argument I would use to the young 'ladettes' who ape the worst in men by getting drunk every Saturday night and falling about all over the streets. 

 

I never stopped acting sexily and I had two husbands and a couple of long term lovers to prove it:smileyvery-happy:

 

 





 


 

Message Edited by thewanderingjew on 03-17-2009 05:02 PM

 


 

 


 


 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"


Everyman wrote:

Hmmm.  A well mannered and well behaved rebel.  That's a new one for me. 


Eman -- I believe you have said that you participated in civil rights actions?  Were you not well-mannered and polite during those endeavors?

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

The height of my incivility would be singing protest songs P:smileyvery-happy:.  I usually march with a particular group of people and our main contribution to the morale of a protest is to play musical instruments and to sing.  I have been in two protest marches of over 20,000 people - Anti-apartheid and CND - where there was absolutely no riotous or uncivil behaviour whatsoever.  CND marches were well known for their 'pacifism' and singing.  I have also been in marches where there was riotous activity where arrests were made, but I have never been part of that activity - I always avoided it because I do not think it does any 'cause' any good, it is part of my Fabianism.  Also, the group I usually march with often take young children along and it is important to avoid such things for their sake.   

 

I expect there are others here who have 'rebelled' against particular pieces of their government's legislation by going on protest rallies but I expect that they too, being reasonable non-violent people, have not behaved badly despite the bad behaviour around them. 

 

 

 

Peppermill wrote:

Eman -- I believe you have said that you participated in civil rights actions?  Were you not well-mannered and polite during those endeavors?


 

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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: "This woman is for sale. Blonde woman for sale!"

But I have never self-described as a rebel. 

 

Nor as a "cranky old lady," which seems somewhat distant from well mannered and well behaved at all times.  But maybe cranky means something different in England than it does in America.  

 


Peppermill wrote:

Everyman wrote:

Hmmm.  A well mannered and well behaved rebel.  That's a new one for me. 


Eman -- I believe you have said that you participated in civil rights actions?  Were you not well-mannered and polite during those endeavors?


 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.