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Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
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Re: The joys of travelling.

Over here, finance is not the only thing which governs the purchase and use of cars.  More and more people are becoming aware of the cost to themselves and the environment and are choosing to do without them whenever they can.  And by various tax breaks and subsidies, governments are encouraging them to do this.

 

I think it is still the case that the elderly or infirm are confined to home, unless they are fortunate enough to have others who will take them out and about.  Disabled access to buildings and many other places is still not that good anywhere and so freedom is curtailed by age and disability.  A look at travel guides for the elderly/disabled is very enlightening in this regard.  Which is why travel companies who specialise in holidays for such people do so well.   

 

Of course everyone is free to make choices (even Europeans:smileyhappy:), I was merely pointing out that saying that folks need cars, or that they cannot walk to a bus stop, is not necessarily true.  I know a number of elderly women who say they cannot walk, for instance, and get their daughters to take them to a shopping 'mall', where they will walk very well indeed!   There are a lot of lazy, inactive people around, which is why we have a problem with obesity, which I suppose is freedom to die an earlier death.       

 

 

 

 


utopian wrote:

What I hear in your post C is the financial aspect which of course is the bottom line.  If you can easily afford a car, you want one, which was my point.

 

Another point you raise is very true.  In the past, when railways were the major means of travel, the elderly or infirm would generally be confined to home.  

 

I'm happy that you are happy with your life.  Please accept that others make other choices that are right for them.  That's the very definition of freedom. 


 

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TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: The joys of travelling.


Choisya wrote:

Being isolated has nothing to do with size.  It is about how accessible places are and what access local people have to modes of transport.  

 

However, I have become aware, because I am so often told, that America is quite quite Exceptional in every way and cannot be possibly compared with any other country on the globe, nor can it learn from any other country.  

 

 


I'll assume your tongue was in your cheek for that one.
Is the American perspective different than the European one, yes. Some of you countries are the size of Rhodes Island and well I've always lived in states with counties bigger than that entire state. 
Size matters even if only in the mind. I'm sure China feels the same way when talking to you European too. "Don't they realize too many people and too much space?!" 
Would America benefit from additional mass transportation, yes. But I'll run a car on used cooking oil before I even think about a "necessary" switch for everyday transportation. (Tisk got 3 trucks, 2 sedans, and a company van in the drive way now) 
You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.

 

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006

Re: The joys of travelling.

Again, isolation has nothing to do with size.  You can be as isolated on a Scottish croft where 'roads' are ancient mule tracks and the ferries don't run in the winter as you can in the middle of Texas. There are villages in the Alps which can only be reached on foot and not at all for some months of the year.     

 

You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.

 

This maybe says it all.   There should be nothing disconcerting about living next to countries you are at peace with. Europeans were at war with one another for centuries, hence the post-war European Union.  We have a lot of trouble with our border with France - the English Channel - where we have a perennial immigration problem on ferry traffic.  Again, there is nothing exceptional about immigration problems.   

 

You also have a border with Canada - is that equally disconcerting?  America was founded by different nationalities - the 'poor and huddled masses', why are they now disconcerting? 

 

One of my joys is travelling by coach through 6 different countries to get to Italy and seeing/sampling different languages, foods, dress, customs along the way.   Vive la difference!  

 

 

 

 


TiggerBear wrote:


Choisya wrote:

Being isolated has nothing to do with size.  It is about how accessible places are and what access local people have to modes of transport.  

 

However, I have become aware, because I am so often told, that America is quite quite Exceptional in every way and cannot be possibly compared with any other country on the globe, nor can it learn from any other country.  

 

 


I'll assume your tongue was in your cheek for that one.
Is the American perspective different than the European one, yes. Some of you countries are the size of Rhodes Island and well I've always lived in states with counties bigger than that entire state. 
Size matters even if only in the mind. I'm sure China feels the same way when talking to you European too. "Don't they realize too many people and too much space?!" 
Would America benefit from additional mass transportation, yes. But I'll run a car on used cooking oil before I even think about a "necessary" switch for everyday transportation. (Tisk got 3 trucks, 2 sedans, and a company van in the drive way now) 
You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.


Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
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Re: For utopian.

In case you ever get the urge to travel from London/Paris to Athens again, there are now much better ways to get there over land and sea.  European rail services have improved by leaps and bounds over the past 20 years because of EU investment. 
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utopian
Posts: 103
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Re: The joys of travelling.


Choisya wrote:

Over here, finance is not the only thing which governs the purchase and use of cars.  More and more people are becoming aware of the cost to themselves and the environment and are choosing to do without them whenever they can.  And by various tax breaks and subsidies, governments are encouraging them to do this.

 

I think it is still the case that the elderly or infirm are confined to home, unless they are fortunate enough to have others who will take them out and about.  Disabled access to buildings and many other places is still not that good anywhere and so freedom is curtailed by age and disability.  A look at travel guides for the elderly/disabled is very enlightening in this regard.  Which is why travel companies who specialise in holidays for such people do so well.   

 

Of course everyone is free to make choices (even Europeans:smileyhappy:), I was merely pointing out that saying that folks need cars, or that they cannot walk to a bus stop, is not necessarily true.  I know a number of elderly women who say they cannot walk, for instance, and get their daughters to take them to a shopping 'mall', where they will walk very well indeed!   There are a lot of lazy, inactive people around, which is why we have a problem with obesity, which I suppose is freedom to die an earlier death.       

 

 

 

 


utopian wrote:

What I hear in your post C is the financial aspect which of course is the bottom line.  If you can easily afford a car, you want one, which was my point.

 

Another point you raise is very true.  In the past, when railways were the major means of travel, the elderly or infirm would generally be confined to home.  

 

I'm happy that you are happy with your life.  Please accept that others make other choices that are right for them.  That's the very definition of freedom. 


 



Too bad your country doesn't have our Disabilities Act which requires every public place to be wheel chair accessible.  It is a requirement.  Elevators were installed, curbs sloped, bathroom doors removed.  It was an incredibly compassionate thing to do and has made the handicapped free to go to the movies, theatre, shopping, etc.  Even buses have to have little lifts that can help a handicapped person get on to the bus.  

 

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utopian
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎04-13-2009

Re: The joys of travelling.


TiggerBear wrote:

Choisya wrote:

Being isolated has nothing to do with size.  It is about how accessible places are and what access local people have to modes of transport.  

 

However, I have become aware, because I am so often told, that America is quite quite Exceptional in every way and cannot be possibly compared with any other country on the globe, nor can it learn from any other country.  

 

 


I'll assume your tongue was in your cheek for that one.
Is the American perspective different than the European one, yes. Some of you countries are the size of Rhodes Island and well I've always lived in states with counties bigger than that entire state. 
Size matters even if only in the mind. I'm sure China feels the same way when talking to you European too. "Don't they realize too many people and too much space?!" 
Would America benefit from additional mass transportation, yes. But I'll run a car on used cooking oil before I even think about a "necessary" switch for everyday transportation. (Tisk got 3 trucks, 2 sedans, and a company van in the drive way now) 
You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.

 


C, I'm sure that if I went on a British site I would find a lot of people who feel that Britain is the best of all possible worlds, just as you do.  And I could never imagine criticizing their country to them.  Especially if I had never been there!

 

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debbook
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Re: The joys of travelling.


utopian wrote:


Too bad your country doesn't have our Disabilities Act which requires every public place to be wheel chair accessible.  It is a requirement.  Elevators were installed, curbs sloped, bathroom doors removed.  It was an incredibly compassionate thing to do and has made the handicapped free to go to the movies, theatre, shopping, etc.  Even buses have to have little lifts that can help a handicapped person get on to the bus.  

 


Oh C, when will you get it? America is wonderful and perfect and we don't need to change anything. Ever. Europe, especially the British, just will never get us. You Brits are so lacking in compassion!:smileyvery-happy:

A room without books is like a body without a soul.~ Cicero...
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Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: The joys of travelling.

However, I have become aware, because I am so often told, that America is quite quite Exceptional in every way and cannot be possibly compared with any other country on the globe, nor can it learn from any other country. 

 

It took you seventy some years to realize it, but I'm glad that you finally got to the truth!

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
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TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
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Re: The joys of travelling.


Choisya wrote:

Again, isolation has nothing to do with size.  You can be as isolated on a Scottish croft where 'roads' are ancient mule tracks and the ferries don't run in the winter as you can in the middle of Texas. There are villages in the Alps which can only be reached on foot and not at all for some months of the year.     

 

You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.

 

This maybe says it all.   There should be nothing disconcerting about living next to countries you are at peace with. Europeans were at war with one another for centuries, hence the post-war European Union.  We have a lot of trouble with our border with France - the English Channel - where we have a perennial immigration problem on ferry traffic.  Again, there is nothing exceptional about immigration problems.   

 

You also have a border with Canada - is that equally disconcerting?  America was founded by different nationalities - the 'poor and huddled masses', why are they now disconcerting? 

 

One of my joys is travelling by coach through 6 different countries to get to Italy and seeing/sampling different languages, foods, dress, customs along the way.   Vive la difference!  

 



So you're not getting footage of all the extreme gang violence just on the other side of the Mexican border? Cops liken it to civil war within Mexico. The past spring break travelers were issued extreme warning NOT to go to Mexico for vacation. Too high a death toll. So between the serial killer in Jamaica and the Holloway stuff in Aruba; Porto Rico experienced it's best spring break season ever.
 So sure we're at peace with the Mexican government, just not the Mexican people. And you can watch that line blurring as Mexico's crime rate skyrockets.
But disconcerting feelings stem more from illegal border crossings. If it didn't bother you pre911, it does now. Canada unlike Mexico has since 911 tightened it's border crossings much to American satisfaction. Mexico hasn't. It's as simple as that.
 Americans get the same joy, without the necessary papers just traveling across a few states. With fewer language difficulties too.
 
 
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
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Re: The joys of travelling.

Europe has the same legislation utopian but unfortunately we also have thousands of very old buildings which cannot be adapted.  Many of the theatres in the West End, for instance, are around 300 years old and would become unstable if major reconstruction work, like installing lifts, were to take place. Tudor buildings in particular, are both expensive and difficult to adapt.  Labrynthine castles with stone stairs can be equally problematic. Our buses have wheelchair ramps also but many tube stations in London, which are below an ancient city, cannot be adapted.  Have all the New York tubes been adapted?  Are there not buildings in your older towns which cannot be adapted to the new legislation?

 

The problems are even worse in Italy where many buildings either date back many centuries or are on foundations which do.  I expect Greece has similar difficulties.

 

Trains have particular problems too because some of the older ones have steps which are quite high or platforms which are too low.  Disabled people are advised to call a station in advance so that special ramps can be put in place and staff are especially trained to help.  There is good wheelchair access once they are on the train. 

 

As you say, it was compassionate legislation (and much needed) but it has logistic difficulties for many town planners and so there are still many places which do not have adequate disabled access.  

  

 


utopian wrote:

Choisya wrote:

Over here, finance is not the only thing which governs the purchase and use of cars.  More and more people are becoming aware of the cost to themselves and the environment and are choosing to do without them whenever they can.  And by various tax breaks and subsidies, governments are encouraging them to do this.

 

I think it is still the case that the elderly or infirm are confined to home, unless they are fortunate enough to have others who will take them out and about.  Disabled access to buildings and many other places is still not that good anywhere and so freedom is curtailed by age and disability.  A look at travel guides for the elderly/disabled is very enlightening in this regard.  Which is why travel companies who specialise in holidays for such people do so well.   

 

Of course everyone is free to make choices (even Europeans:smileyhappy:), I was merely pointing out that saying that folks need cars, or that they cannot walk to a bus stop, is not necessarily true.  I know a number of elderly women who say they cannot walk, for instance, and get their daughters to take them to a shopping 'mall', where they will walk very well indeed!   There are a lot of lazy, inactive people around, which is why we have a problem with obesity, which I suppose is freedom to die an earlier death.       

 

 

 

 


utopian wrote:

What I hear in your post C is the financial aspect which of course is the bottom line.  If you can easily afford a car, you want one, which was my point.

 

Another point you raise is very true.  In the past, when railways were the major means of travel, the elderly or infirm would generally be confined to home.  

 

I'm happy that you are happy with your life.  Please accept that others make other choices that are right for them.  That's the very definition of freedom. 


 



Too bad your country doesn't have our Disabilities Act which requires every public place to be wheel chair accessible.  It is a requirement.  Elevators were installed, curbs sloped, bathroom doors removed.  It was an incredibly compassionate thing to do and has made the handicapped free to go to the movies, theatre, shopping, etc.  Even buses have to have little lifts that can help a handicapped person get on to the bus.  

 


 

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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: The joys of travelling.

C, I'm sure that if I went on a British site I would find a lot of people who feel that Britain is the best of all possible worlds, just as you do.  And I could never imagine criticizing their country to them.  

 

Brits are notorious for being self-deprecating about their country - even the government worries about it!  Gone are the days of ra-ra Empire, thank goodness.  And I certainly do NOT think that Britain is the best of all possible worlds and have often criticised my country here, just as others have.    All I have been doing here is making comparisons about modes of travel, not criticisms. 

 

Especially if I had never been there!

 

If we only criticised/discussed the countries we had visited it would cut out one h*** of a lot of posts here, not least those about Iraq and Afghanistan or any Muslim country, like Gaza, which has been heavily criticised by you and others.   TB was recently criticising India, which was perfectly OK, but I doubt she has been there, any more than I have.  Ditto those who contributed to discussions on Iran.  Fortunately these days we have books, films, TV etc and can, if we wish, learn a great deal about other countries, the good and the bad.  Not as good as living there, true, but insights can be gained and certainly we can learn a lot that way, especially from documentaries.  Much more than, say, visiting a certain spot on holiday.    Do we have to visit the middle of Australia to know that it is too darn hot?  Or the rainforests of the Amazon to know that it is too darn humid?  Are those like yourself, who study the Great Books program, unable to discuss/criticise ancient Greece or Rome?  Or the Britain of Chaucer?

 

When I first went to the Caribbean and met my late husband's relatives, I met several elderly folks who knew far more about Britain than I did because of the education they had received in their Empire-fuelled youth.  What price education if we can only discuss what we actually see?   

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


utopian wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

Choisya wrote:

Being isolated has nothing to do with size.  It is about how accessible places are and what access local people have to modes of transport.  

 

However, I have become aware, because I am so often told, that America is quite quite Exceptional in every way and cannot be possibly compared with any other country on the globe, nor can it learn from any other country.  

 

 


I'll assume your tongue was in your cheek for that one.
Is the American perspective different than the European one, yes. Some of you countries are the size of Rhodes Island and well I've always lived in states with counties bigger than that entire state. 
Size matters even if only in the mind. I'm sure China feels the same way when talking to you European too. "Don't they realize too many people and too much space?!" 
Would America benefit from additional mass transportation, yes. But I'll run a car on used cooking oil before I even think about a "necessary" switch for everyday transportation. (Tisk got 3 trucks, 2 sedans, and a company van in the drive way now) 
You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.

 


C, I'm sure that if I went on a British site I would find a lot of people who feel that Britain is the best of all possible worlds, just as you do.  And I could never imagine criticizing their country to them.  Especially if I had never been there!

 


 

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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: The joys of travelling.

[ Edited ]

Yes, I have seen the news about the Mexican border.  There are problems like this all over the world.   Have you seen the news about immigration from Africa into France and thence to the UK?  Mainland Europe is a gateway to the world - people actually walk from Afghanistan to Europe! A sea like the Mediterranean (which separates Europe from Africa) is no deterrent  to desperate people.  We do not have so much trouble with gun violence but a great deal of trouble with drugs and child prostitution.  Again, you are pleading exceptionalism - there is nothing exceptional about what America is experiencing with Mexico.  Violent gangs are organising illegal immigration to every country in the world, particularly to wealthy western ones.  I don't think that tighter border controls will ever be tight enough for desperate, dispossessed people:smileysad:

 

(Language difficulties are fun and anyway I have my translator!:smileyhappy:.)        

 

 

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Choisya wrote:

Again, isolation has nothing to do with size.  You can be as isolated on a Scottish croft where 'roads' are ancient mule tracks and the ferries don't run in the winter as you can in the middle of Texas. There are villages in the Alps which can only be reached on foot and not at all for some months of the year.     

 

You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.

 

This maybe says it all.   There should be nothing disconcerting about living next to countries you are at peace with. Europeans were at war with one another for centuries, hence the post-war European Union.  We have a lot of trouble with our border with France - the English Channel - where we have a perennial immigration problem on ferry traffic.  Again, there is nothing exceptional about immigration problems.   

 

You also have a border with Canada - is that equally disconcerting?  America was founded by different nationalities - the 'poor and huddled masses', why are they now disconcerting? 

 

One of my joys is travelling by coach through 6 different countries to get to Italy and seeing/sampling different languages, foods, dress, customs along the way.   Vive la difference!  

 



So you're not getting footage of all the extreme gang violence just on the other side of the Mexican border? Cops liken it to civil war within Mexico. The past spring break travelers were issued extreme warning NOT to go to Mexico for vacation. Too high a death toll. So between the serial killer in Jamaica and the Holloway stuff in Aruba; Porto Rico experienced it's best spring break season ever.
 So sure we're at peace with the Mexican government, just not the Mexican people. And you can watch that line blurring as Mexico's crime rate skyrockets.
But disconcerting feelings stem more from illegal border crossings. If it didn't bother you pre911, it does now. Canada unlike Mexico has since 911 tightened it's border crossings much to American satisfaction. Mexico hasn't. It's as simple as that.
 Americans get the same joy, without the necessary papers just traveling across a few states. With fewer language difficulties too.

 

Message Edited by Choisya on 04-26-2009 01:52 AM
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utopian
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎04-13-2009
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Re: The joys of travelling.


Choisya wrote:

C, I'm sure that if I went on a British site I would find a lot of people who feel that Britain is the best of all possible worlds, just as you do.  And I could never imagine criticizing their country to them.  

 

Brits are notorious for being self-deprecating about their country - even the government worries about it!  Gone are the days of ra-ra Empire, thank goodness.  And I certainly do NOT think that Britain is the best of all possible worlds and have often criticised my country here, just as others have.    All I have been doing here is making comparisons about modes of travel, not criticisms. 

 

Especially if I had never been there!

 

If we only criticised/discussed the countries we had visited it would cut out one h*** of a lot of posts here, not least those about Iraq and Afghanistan or any Muslim country, like Gaza, which has been heavily criticised by you and others.   TB was recently criticising India, which was perfectly OK, but I doubt she has been there, any more than I have.  Ditto those who contributed to discussions on Iran.  Fortunately these days we have books, films, TV etc and can, if we wish, learn a great deal about other countries, the good and the bad.  Not as good as living there, true, but insights can be gained and certainly we can learn a lot that way, especially from documentaries.  Much more than, say, visiting a certain spot on holiday.    Do we have to visit the middle of Australia to know that it is too darn hot?  Or the rainforests of the Amazon to know that it is too darn humid?  Are those like yourself, who study the Great Books program, unable to discuss/criticise ancient Greece or Rome?  Or the Britain of Chaucer?

 

When I first went to the Caribbean and met my late husband's relatives, I met several elderly folks who knew far more about Britain than I did because of the education they had received in their Empire-fuelled youth.  What price education if we can only discuss what we actually see?   

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


utopian wrote:

TiggerBear wrote:

Choisya wrote:

Being isolated has nothing to do with size.  It is about how accessible places are and what access local people have to modes of transport.  

 

However, I have become aware, because I am so often told, that America is quite quite Exceptional in every way and cannot be possibly compared with any other country on the globe, nor can it learn from any other country.  

 

 


I'll assume your tongue was in your cheek for that one.
Is the American perspective different than the European one, yes. Some of you countries are the size of Rhodes Island and well I've always lived in states with counties bigger than that entire state. 
Size matters even if only in the mind. I'm sure China feels the same way when talking to you European too. "Don't they realize too many people and too much space?!" 
Would America benefit from additional mass transportation, yes. But I'll run a car on used cooking oil before I even think about a "necessary" switch for everyday transportation. (Tisk got 3 trucks, 2 sedans, and a company van in the drive way now) 
You live right next to so many of you countries neighbors. Most Americans would find that terribly disconcerting. That wall they're trying to build between us and Mexico is a big clue.

 


C, I'm sure that if I went on a British site I would find a lot of people who feel that Britain is the best of all possible worlds, just as you do.  And I could never imagine criticizing their country to them.  Especially if I had never been there!

 


 


C. I have learned a tremendous amount from you, about England and the English people.  I have a much better understanding of how the English view the world.  Thank you.
Good-bye.

 

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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: The joys of travelling.

Oh C, when will you get it? America is wonderful and perfect and we don't need to change anything. Ever. Europe, especially the British, just will never get us. You Brits are so lacking in compassion!:smileyvery-happy:

 

LOL Debs.  As Eman says, it has taken me 70 years but I am getting there!:smileyhappy:  There is a thread somewhere which says 'Bad Brits', I'd better post under that in future.  Or maybe change my username to BadBrit?:smileysurprised:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


debbook wrote:

utopian wrote:


Too bad your country doesn't have our Disabilities Act which requires every public place to be wheel chair accessible.  It is a requirement.  Elevators were installed, curbs sloped, bathroom doors removed.  It was an incredibly compassionate thing to do and has made the handicapped free to go to the movies, theatre, shopping, etc.  Even buses have to have little lifts that can help a handicapped person get on to the bus.  

 


Oh C, when will you get it? America is wonderful and perfect and we don't need to change anything. Ever. Europe, especially the British, just will never get us. You Brits are so lacking in compassion!:smileyvery-happy:


 

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utopian
Posts: 103
Registered: ‎04-13-2009
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Re: The joys of travelling.

Why do I feel I'm in junior high?
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Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006

Re: The problems of travelling.

My point in continuing this thread was not to criticise American transport but to point out the problems we will all encounter if we do not pull together and do something to stop the pollution and waste in the world, quite a lot of which is caused by various forms of transport.  Everyman pointed out on another thread that flying is a great pollutant too.  Rail is less of a pollutant because it does not use oil and because railways can transport a large number of people at the same time.  We all know that lines of cars with just one person in them, on every motorway in the world is not a 'good thing', freedom and independence notwithstanding.  

 

Transport policy is a now big issue for governments all over the world, especially as China and India, both very populous countries, are coming 'onstream' and beginning to use more cars and fossil fuels generally.  India is now producing the world's cheapest car, just as Ford once did, and that is cause for concern because it is petrol driven and within quite a short space of time millions will be on the road.  No doubt China will follow and there will be billions more on the road.  Remember the pollution at the Olympic games - that eventually gets into our lungs too! 

 

You do not have to be a 'believer' in global warming/cooling to realise that this means much more pollution in the atmosphere, in landfill and in the seas, when we  know there is already too much.   If the Western nations cannot give a lead by cutting back their consumption of fossil fuels, there is absolutely no hope of getting these much more populous countries to do so.  America needs to give a lead just as it has done in other things.  It is no good exporting 'freedom and democracy' to the world at the same time as helping to poison those who live in it.  There are some encouraging trends in North America, showing a downward trend in air pollution but America (and Canada)  still 'have the largest per capita consumption of energy and natural resources in the world' and contribute disproportionately to the emission of greenhouse gases.  This concerns me, which is why I raise these issues, and I think that it is a matter which should concern all of us.  I have been accused of being 'nasty' and 'anti-American' because I raise these things but they are well-measured truths and there are plenty of Americans who are worried about them too, such as this Native American who made this wonderful little video about our responsibility to our planet.

 

Have you looked at your carbon footprint lately?  I have and I cut out long haul air journeys several years ago and now only do short haul ones every two years.  My age may soon stop me travelling abroad alone so that should reduce it even more:smileyhappy:.  I have also put energy saving light bulbs in every room of my house - they are much improved these days, I am pleased to say.  I look at the labels in the shops and try not to buy things which have travelled too far although I like to buy Californian orange juice and think of Kathy!  We do not have to be martyrs but as with buying Fair Trade goods, if we all do a little bit we will make a huge cooperative contribution to the welfare of the world.     

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Choisya
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Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Looking ahead.

These Superliner railway carriages made by Amtrak look great - are they still operating and has anyone travelled on them?   I have ridden on high, double-decker trains similar to this in Germany but in the UK many of our old bridges are very low and could not accommodate them without a great deal of expensive re-routing.  However, the new high speed trains, which travel at 330 k/mh are low and streamlined and I guess that is the design of the future - more wind resistance etc.  The Germans have also designed the Transrapid at 550 km/h but as yet there are not many tracks converted for it.    I have found the French TGV the most comfortable to travel on and that is the one used for the Eurostar between London and Paris. They are quiet and spacious - some people hire a whole carriage for parties. The catering is excellent too and I try to time my journey between London and Paris so that I get a good lunch on the way there and a good dinner on the way back!:smileyhappy: 

 

I see from this article that a forward-looking President Obama is talking of bringing a high-speed rail network to the US, although because of your old infrastructure it will be awhile before your trains can reach the 330 k/mh of Europe.  In the UK we are currently updating the London to Edinburgh and London to Glasgow lines.  So far I can get to Manchester at 330 k/mh.  I would like it to slow down when it goes past the Yorkshire Dales on the way to Edinburgh:smileyhappy: 

 

As the President said: “Imagine whisking through towns at speeds over 100 miles an hour [that's slow!!}, walking only a few steps to public transportation, and ending up just blocks from your destination...It is happening right now; it’s been happening for decades. The problem is, it’s been happening elsewhere, not here.”

 

I take it that these are different plans to the 'mono-rail' announced by Biden, which started this thread?  One of those is planned for London.  I know there is one in Seattle but it is short.   Are there other longer ones in the US?  I look forward to going on the London one before I pop my clogs.:smileyvery-happy:  Have you been on the one in Seattle, Everyman?  It must be like flying, only seeing the view.  

 

   

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: The joys of travelling.

I think it's closer to a frat house, personally


utopian wrote:
Why do I feel I'm in junior high?

 

 

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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Looking ahead.

I believe it was Heinlein who wrote a story about the development of rolling roads.  These had replaced busses, railroads, etc.  They were essentially huge conveyer belts which were constantly moving.  You first stepped onto a 5 mph belt, then from that onto a 10 mph belt, etc.   For in-city transportation, the fastest belt might be fifteen or twenty miles an hour, but of course no stoplights, no stopping at all, just step off when you got to wherever you wanted to go.  For inter-city transportation, you worked up to a 100 mph belt, which had restaurants and all sorts of amenities.  A change of direction at 5 mph isn't going to bother anybody was his theory.  Of course you would need different levels with some going EW and other NS so they could cross, but overall the concept was actually fairly interesting -- just the idea of the moving walkways now in many airports but taken to a much higher level . 
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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
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Re: Looking ahead.

Yes, they do seem like a good idea.  Have you any idea why they have not been developed for more general use instead of just inside airports?  I have an notion that Japan make more use of them. 

 

 


Everyman wrote:
I believe it was Heinlein who wrote a story about the development of rolling roads.  These had replaced busses, railroads, etc.  They were essentially huge conveyer belts which were constantly moving.  You first stepped onto a 5 mph belt, then from that onto a 10 mph belt, etc.   For in-city transportation, the fastest belt might be fifteen or twenty miles an hour, but of course no stoplights, no stopping at all, just step off when you got to wherever you wanted to go.  For inter-city transportation, you worked up to a 100 mph belt, which had restaurants and all sorts of amenities.  A change of direction at 5 mph isn't going to bother anybody was his theory.  Of course you would need different levels with some going EW and other NS so they could cross, but overall the concept was actually fairly interesting -- just the idea of the moving walkways now in many airports but taken to a much higher level .