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Inspired Contributor
Choisya
Posts: 10,782
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.

[ Edited ]

But they don't deliver, at least as they have told me, to residential addresses, and have a limited distance their trucks will deliver in (not to my area).   

 

 

With all due respect Everyman, you can't expect a company to deliver to an island some miles off the coast without paying quite a lot more.  To use the sort of analogy you use about paying taxes towards those less fortunate than yourself, why should someone in Seattle pay towards delivery costs for someone on San Juan island? 

 

If a large enough number of people on the island wanted deliveries, it might be in Costco's interests to deliver there but otherwise you have to pay a price for living in a more remote place than most other people.  People in the Scottish Highlands have the same problem.  There are advantages to living in remote areas, but there are also disadvantages and this is one of them. 

 

If a development really is vehicle free, though, none of these orders could be delivered directly to the house.  

 

No development I have ever heard of is completely 'vehicle free'.  What about doctors and ambulances?  Services for the elderly and disabled? Refuse disposal? Being vehicle free does not mean going back to the middle ages, or even pre-war. The developers apply common sense to such projects and have to work within certain modern parameters.  People are being encouraged to use as few vehicles as possible, it isn't the intention to make their lives difficult or to make ordinary shopping trips an impossibility!  After all, they will have tendentious Everymans in their communities too and will need their votes!:smileysurprised:

 

 

 

 


Everyman wrote:

Costco does deliver for business customers who are close enough to one of their stores.  But they don't deliver, at least as they have told me, to residential addresses, and have a limited distance their trucks will deliver in (not to my area).  

 

They will ship products from costco.com just as most retailers will, but that requires that some carrier be able to drive up to and deliver to the home.  And they can't ship food products that require refrigeration this way.  

 

If a development really is vehicle free, though, none of these orders could be delivered directly to the house.  


Jon_B wrote:

Everyman wrote:

One supposes, but one doesn't really know.

 

I doubt that Costco would deliver an order.

 


Sure they would.  I don't know if every location delivers and there is definitely a minimum, but some of them do deliver, I worked for a small company that had Costco deliver to us regularly.   


 

 


 

Message Edited by Choisya on 05-13-2009 04:39 PM
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.

With all due respect Everyman, you can't expect a company to deliver to an island some miles off the coast without paying quite a lot more.

 

Sure I can.  The Post Office does. FedEx does.  UPS does.  All deliver at the same rates as they charge for any other area in this zone, which includes most of Western Washington.  But Costco won't deliver period.

 

 

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Inspired Contributor
Choisya
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.

The Post Office is presumably a national service which by law has to deliver to all US addresses?  A company delivering groceries on a weekly basis would have to charge far less than parcel carriers to make it economic for customers - they are not comparable.  There is also the problem you mentioned earlier, that of refrigeration and being able to keep groceries fresh.  You have mentioned that you sometimes have difficulties with your ferry and a food company could not risk food detiorating in transit. 

 

BTW on some islands off the coast Scotland, which are probably more remote than where you live, Post Office (Royal Mail) vans deliver groceries and all  kinds of other things, even acting as buses for some people.  I have friends in a remote area and they get their deliveries from Harrods and Fortnum & Masons - I expect an upmarket store in New York/Washington would perform the same service for you but of course you pay over the odds for their goods. 

 

 


Everyman wrote:

With all due respect Everyman, you can't expect a company to deliver to an island some miles off the coast without paying quite a lot more.

 

Sure I can.  The Post Office does. FedEx does.  UPS does.  All deliver at the same rates as they charge for any other area in this zone, which includes most of Western Washington.  But Costco won't deliver period.

 

 


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.


Everyman wrote:

With all due respect Everyman, you can't expect a company to deliver to an island some miles off the coast without paying quite a lot more.

 

Sure I can.  The Post Office does. FedEx does.  UPS does.  All deliver at the same rates as they charge for any other area in this zone, which includes most of Western Washington.  But Costco won't deliver period.

 

 


Sorry but it no different than a restaurant and a 10m delivery service. That's why when you call up the pizza guy they ask for you address and some times send you to a different restaurant, because you are out of their area. Each company has the right to set any delivery area limit. If you want total delivery live in an area where you live in the limit areas, or get over it.

 

If you live more than 20 miles from a hospital don't expect the ambulance to arrive in five minutes either. (shrug)

 

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Everyman
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.

I'm not complaining.  I'm happy to drive to the stores to get things.

 

This whole discussion arose from how to live in an area which prohibits cars and other vehicles -- a walking community.  

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Everyman wrote:

With all due respect Everyman, you can't expect a company to deliver to an island some miles off the coast without paying quite a lot more.

 

Sure I can.  The Post Office does. FedEx does.  UPS does.  All deliver at the same rates as they charge for any other area in this zone, which includes most of Western Washington.  But Costco won't deliver period.

 

 


Sorry but it no different than a restaurant and a 10m delivery service. That's why when you call up the pizza guy they ask for you address and some times send you to a different restaurant, because you are out of their area. Each company has the right to set any delivery area limit. If you want total delivery live in an area where you live in the limit areas, or get over it.

 

If you live more than 20 miles from a hospital don't expect the ambulance to arrive in five minutes either. (shrug)

 


 

 

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Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.


Everyman wrote:

I'm not complaining.  I'm happy to drive to the stores to get things.

 

This whole discussion arose from how to live in an area which prohibits cars and other vehicles -- a walking community.  

 


TiggerBear wrote:

Everyman wrote:

With all due respect Everyman, you can't expect a company to deliver to an island some miles off the coast without paying quite a lot more.

 

Sure I can.  The Post Office does. FedEx does.  UPS does.  All deliver at the same rates as they charge for any other area in this zone, which includes most of Western Washington.  But Costco won't deliver period.

 

 


Sorry but it no different than a restaurant and a 10m delivery service. That's why when you call up the pizza guy they ask for you address and some times send you to a different restaurant, because you are out of their area. Each company has the right to set any delivery area limit. If you want total delivery live in an area where you live in the limit areas, or get over it.

 

If you live more than 20 miles from a hospital don't expect the ambulance to arrive in five minutes either. (shrug)

 


 

 


Which is a bit of an oxymoron in the first place. After all if you didn't drive to get it someone else drove to get it for you.

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.

I love your shrugs and chuckles TB:smileyhappy:.
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
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Re: Alternative fuel sources.

(smile) Thanks. I'm a terrible hands and body talker. It's hard sometimes to express exactly what one would see sitting across from me durring a conversation. But I do try.
Inspired Contributor
Choisya
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Re: Aha!


Jim Tankersley and Richard Simon of the The Los Angeles Times write: "The Obama administration plans to announce on Tuesday that it will set national restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles, in what environmentalists are hailing as a major step to curb global warming and spur development of more fuel-efficient cars."

 

How will this affect y'all?

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Everyman
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Re: Aha!

One consequence will be a much greater impact on families.  Families with several children, particularly extended families (as ours is, four generations living on one property) need larger vehicles, which are necessarily less fuel efficient.  In order to meet the proposed fuel efficiency standards auto makers will be forced to move more and more away from larger vehicles into smaller vehicles, which are fine for single folks or childless couples, but just try to put a family into a smart car.  Or try to fit a child carseat in the back (in most states it's illegal to put them in the front) seat of most hybrids. 

 

And the few larger cars the auto makers do manage to make will be hideously expensive.

 

The war on families.  Just another unintended (I hope)  consequence of this proposal.


Choisya wrote:


Jim Tankersley and Richard Simon of the The Los Angeles Times write: "The Obama administration plans to announce on Tuesday that it will set national restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles, in what environmentalists are hailing as a major step to curb global warming and spur development of more fuel-efficient cars."

 

How will this affect y'all?


 

 

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L_Monty
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Re: Aha!


Everyman wrote:
One consequence will be a much greater impact on families.  Families with several children, particularly extended families (as ours is, four generations living on one property) need larger vehicles, which are necessarily less fuel efficient.  In order to meet the proposed fuel efficiency standards auto makers will be forced to move more and more away from larger vehicles into smaller vehicles, which are fine for single folks or childless couples, but just try to put a family into a smart car.

Well, that would be dumb. But there are more alternatives than just a smart car.



Or try to fit a child carseat in the back (in most states it's illegal to put them in the front) seat of most hybrids.

I don't know how else to say this, but I've sat in the backseat in plenty of hybrids, and there's room enough back there to start a family.



And the few larger cars the auto makers do manage to make will be hideously expensive.

They're hideously expensive now, without anything to blame for that other than boldly exploring just how stupid American consumers are. They're glorified station wagons built upward and jacked an additional 10k just for the status element of an SUV, and that's before getting to stuff like the Navigator, Escalade, H2, Lexus, Mercedes or BMW SUVs, which are jacked up even further in price for the luxury automobile cachet or maybe just hip-hop stylin'. SUV prices have been driven upward by status (and at least in part by American automakers offsetting the failures of their other car lines by taking all their profits out of trucks and SUVs) and are already humorously irrational. Think of this as a green-initiative-driven market correction.
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Everyman
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Re: Aha!

I don't know how else to say this, but I've sat in the backseat in plenty of hybrids, and there's room enough back there to start a family.

 

How many have you actually put a toddler sized car seat in, and then put a child into the car seat?  

 

You young folks can start a family in the back seat of a VW if you're minded to -- plenty in my day did just that.  But modern toddler sized car seats are another matter. 

 

 They're hideously expensive now, without anything to blame for that other than boldly exploring just how stupid American consumers are.

 

I'm not talking fancy SUVs.  Most families can't afford those, what with the cost of raising children these days.   I'm talking the basic family people mover -- the mini van.  At the moment they're somewhat affordable, but just wait.  

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Inspired Contributor
Choisya
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Re: Aha!

I don't know how else to say this, but I've sat in the backseat in plenty of hybrids, and there's room enough back there to start a family.

 

Thank goodness for that Monty or your government might get accused of genetic engineering too:smileyvery-happy:.

 

  

How many have you actually put a toddler sized car seat in, and then put a child into the car seat?  

 

My daughter used to have a Mini when my grand-daughter was a baby and we managed fine with that, which was smaller and lower than many of the new hybrids. 

 

These changes will not, in any case, take place overnight.  It will be a gradual switch as it has been in Europe.  These apocalyptic visions are rather OTT. 

 

 

 

 

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Aha!


Everyman wrote:

I don't know how else to say this, but I've sat in the backseat in plenty of hybrids, and there's room enough back there to start a family.

 

How many have you actually put a toddler sized car seat in, and then put a child into the car seat?  

 


(hand up) Just incase you haven't used one in the past year. He's right they are huge. Strapping one in, plus the kid, plus the kit for that one kid; takes the entire bench seat. That's one bench seat per child under the age of 12. Because where I live it's 12 or under 100lbs in a child seat or booster by law. Sure you can get 2 boosters to a bench in a full size seat bench, but not anything more narrow.