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KathyS
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Re: Colors? Book covers and dust jackets

:smileyvery-happy: :smileyvery-happy: :smileyvery-happy:.....Hot Pink on TTT. Wouldn't that be a sight!

I'm looking at Dot's other book covers (not the jackets, except for one)...One book was Red - then Beigh/blue - then purple/white/lavendar: and the one I love more than anything is, Isle of Plams. The book cover was so different, having a scene I love, showing through the Palms on the jacket itself. Art overlapping art. And a sturdy jacket, it is too! I loved that concept more than anything. So creative! I think I'll stop this thread of discussion, before I get too carried away, and I end up changing Dot's book cover to pale peach with swirls of deep blues, pinks and magentas tracing across a Caribbean blue watery sky! :smileyhappy:

mairwill wrote:
KathyS and All--

I loved the bright colors on the cover, but that alone wouldn't make me buy a book. And the colors do have to be appropriate, as you say, to the content of the book. Can you imagine "The Thirteenth Tale" in bright colors? EGADS!!

Later--

Mair


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Wrighty
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cover


mairwill wrote:
All--

I know this sounds stupid, but sometimes as I was reading, I'd close the book and look at the beautiful colors on the cover again.

Later--

Mair




That's not stupid at all. It's a beautiful cover and it conveys the perfect mood for mango sunsets. I think the artist did a great job. Along with the author of course! :smileywink:
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Wrighty
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Dust covers and vibrant colors


vivico1 wrote:
They are not expensive at all and you can fit them to any book and keep your covers in perfect condition while leaving them on the books to read too. Here's the link:

http://www.shopbrodart.com/site_pages/bjc/






That's such a good idea Viv. Another thing I noticed when I was shopping on this site was that B&N offered a library edition on a book I was looking at. It was a few dollars more and I think the only difference was the cover. I think that included a clear covering but I'm not sure. I didn't check to see if it's offered for all of their books but it sounds like a neat option. Sorry I don't have all of the facts but I thought I pass on the idea anyway.
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions/ back to Kevin

You know, only a gay friend could wind up calling a woman, Petal, for a nickname lol. No straight man is going to, not out loud in front of people anyway lol. Dot, did your Kevin, call you Petal or have a nickname for you? And his Miss Liz the pole dancer lol, he is so funny. One thing tho, and we will see how this goes throughout the book, he seems too easy to get a hold of or to come running right then. Who can do that all the time as a working adult?? I wish I had a friend like that, that one call and bing, there they were. Kevin I don't find as snobbish as Miriam but knows HOW to talk the talk and walk the walk with her. But also as I mentioned before gay men can really come up with some cutting put downs too, yikes they know where to hit a woman lol!
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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kiakar
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions/ back to Kevin



vivico1 wrote:
You know, only a gay friend could wind up calling a woman, Petal, for a nickname lol. No straight man is going to, not out loud in front of people anyway lol. Dot, did your Kevin, call you Petal or have a nickname for you? And his Miss Liz the pole dancer lol, he is so funny. One thing tho, and we will see how this goes throughout the book, he seems too easy to get a hold of or to come running right then. Who can do that all the time as a working adult?? I wish I had a friend like that, that one call and bing, there they were. Kevin I don't find as snobbish as Miriam but knows HOW to talk the talk and walk the walk with her. But also as I mentioned before gay men can really come up with some cutting put downs too, yikes they know where to hit a woman lol!





Yeah: I wondered about the nickname Petal. Never heard of it, ever. But if I had a friend like Kevin I would alow him any nickname he wanted. hehehe
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Stephanie
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions

Mair,

Well, I have a teacher friend, a gentleman from Kentucky, as a matter of fact, who calls me Mrs. Moffitt. So? I don't know what to make of Miriam's ways, and I thought about the formality of my childhood in NY. We called all adults, Mr., Mrs. and Miss, with their last name. In the South, it's Miss or Mr. and a first name. In a way, I think Miriam is living in the past. But some things people discuss in the present? There are things I just don't want to know! Sometimes people are a bit too personal.

I think this is an interesting topic - Group, what do you think about society's informal address system?






mairwill wrote:


AnnMar wrote:
I like the title and the cover. Both drew me right in. I must see Sullivans Island one day and see a mango sunset for myself.

Like everyone here I would love to have a friend like Kevin. He is always there to make things better. Now for Miriam, I feel sorry for someone whose selfworth depends on where others see you on the social ladder. I do, however, love her note writing. I write thank notes and would rather receive hand written notes instead of emails, but I don't send quite a many as Miriam does. And the way she signs her notes, with her complete name - Miriam Elizabeth Swanson. So stiff and formal.

Now Harry made me laugh. He knows exactly what to say and when to say it.

Ann





And Miriam was so formal in even addressing the lady she had worked with on all these committees as Ms. Willis. Do those high society people really do that? Call each other Ms. Willis or Ms. Swanson?

Later--

Mair


Stephanie
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Stephanie
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Dust covers and vibrant colors

Debbie,

That library edition will be much more securely bound than your ordinary hardback, that's why it's a few dollars more. They're made to withstand lots of abuse.





Wrighty wrote: That's such a good idea Viv. Another thing I noticed when I was shopping on this site was that B&N offered a library edition on a book I was looking at. It was a few dollars more and I think the only difference was the cover. I think that included a clear covering but I'm not sure. I didn't check to see if it's offered for all of their books but it sounds like a neat option. Sorry I don't have all of the facts but I thought I pass on the idea anyway.



Stephanie
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions


Stephanie wrote:
Mair,

Well, I have a teacher friend, a gentleman from Kentucky, as a matter of fact, who calls me Mrs. Moffitt. So? I don't know what to make of Miriam's ways, and I thought about the formality of my childhood in NY. We called all adults, Mr., Mrs. and Miss, with their last name. In the South, it's Miss or Mr. and a first name. In a way, I think Miriam is living in the past. But some things people discuss in the present? There are things I just don't want to know! Sometimes people are a bit too personal.

I think this is an interesting topic - Group, what do you think about society's informal address system?







I am 50 now and I hate when someone calls me ma'am lol. For people I dont know, I dont mind calling them Mr or Mrs, I will usually ask someone if its ok to call them Irene or whatever, if i dont know them, or I address them as I am introduced to them. I dont know Dorothea, she doesnt know me, but I am very informal in these book club settings and tend to call the authors by their first names. I have been calling her Dot, because the club does but even more so because thats what she calls herself. I think the Miss thing is kinda cute if its like a term of endearment name,like Miss Lizz, or Miss Josie. The women at the society committee stuff, like working on the invitations, unless everyone calls someone Mrs so and so because she expects it, I am a first name person or nickname person all the way, from day one. I rarely even use my last name lol.
But having said that, I do think children should be taught to call their elders, Mr and Mrs out of respect for them. If then a particular adult tells them its ok to call me charlie, I am fine with that, but I think its good they learn that politeness towards adults. Not to say adults dont have to be polite either lol, you hope it carries over in other ways or in this case, just ask the other adult what they prefer to go by.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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KathyS
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions

Mrs. Moffitt wrote: But some things people discuss in the present? There are things I just don't want to know! Sometimes people are a bit too personal.

I think this is an interesting topic - Group, what do you think about society's informal address system?
____________________________
Can you give an example, I'm not sure what personal, in this context, means. Giving information about themselves, or asking personal questions of you? Do you die your hair? Do you sleep with your mouth open? Do you eat bell peppers....what? (which I don't, to two of the above)

Miss Kathy(S)
P.S. That cake scenario, to everyone, was a joke! NO cake, NO Post Master, Nada! Nothing personal. :smileyhappy:
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Stephanie
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions

Viv,

I think that works- basically your saying whatever the society you're in dictates is how you should do.

Still... I don't think I want a kid calling me by my first name (isn't that when they start to get disrespectful?), so I hope society never dictates that 'round here.
Stephanie
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Stephanie
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions



KathyS wrote:
Mrs. Moffitt wrote: But some things people discuss in the present? There are things I just don't want to know! Sometimes people are a bit too personal.

I think this is an interesting topic - Group, what do you think about society's informal address system?
____________________________
Can you give an example, I'm not sure what personal, in this context, means. Giving information about themselves, or asking personal questions of you? Do you die your hair? Do you sleep with your mouth open? Do you eat bell peppers....what? (which I don't, to two of the above)

Miss Kathy(S)
P.S. That cake scenario, to everyone, was a joke! NO cake, NO Post Master, Nada! Nothing personal. :smileyhappy:


Miss Kathy S.,

Oh, you know - telling a coworker the really personal bits of your day- restroom visits, monthly cycles, etc., in glorious detail -- the television commercials that prompt - "Mom, what's a ______________?" You fill in the scary blank! Then you'll find yourself explaining What kind of dryness? to an eleven year old boy. Yikes!

Anyway, I think this whole idea of losing our inhibitions is what gives Miriam the heebies, and what keeps her wearing little white gloves and fixing her hair before she goes to the market.
Stephanie
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Wrighty
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southern good manners

I wonder a few things about Miriam and maybe you southern girls can help me out. I've always heard that people from the south had very fine manners.(I mean that in the best possible way) Do you think that Miriam was too worried about manners, good taste, impressions, etc. because of that? If Miriam was from another area would she be so concerned with it all? I don't mean manners in general I mean to the extreme. There are snobs everywhere but Miriam obviously goes overboard in that department. What are some other opinions?
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KathyS
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions

[ Edited ]

Stephanie wrote:


KathyS wrote:
Mrs. Moffitt wrote: But some things people discuss in the present? There are things I just don't want to know! Sometimes people are a bit too personal.

I think this is an interesting topic - Group, what do you think about society's informal address system?
____________________________
Can you give an example, I'm not sure what personal, in this context, means. Giving information about themselves, or asking personal questions of you? Do you die your hair? Do you sleep with your mouth open? Do you eat bell peppers....what? (which I don't, to two of the above)

Miss Kathy(S)
P.S. That cake scenario, to everyone, was a joke! NO cake, NO Post Master, Nada! Nothing personal. :smileyhappy:


Miss Kathy S.,

Oh, you know - telling a coworker the really personal bits of your day- restroom visits, monthly cycles, etc., in glorious detail -- the television commercials that prompt - "Mom, what's a ______________?" You fill in the scary blank! Then you'll find yourself explaining What kind of dryness? to an eleven year old boy. Yikes!

Anyway, I think this whole idea of losing our inhibitions is what gives Miriam the heebies, and what keeps her wearing little white gloves and fixing her hair before she goes to the market.


Uh, Yes, thank you for the examples, in semi-scary details...I can picture this! I'm leaning to keep my gloves on with Miriam at the moment. I blush as some of the *todays* topics of discussion. I'm not opposed to them, with personal friends and family members, but not Joe(Josephine)Schmoe in Homeroom, or listening to TV comercials about which C-----works the best! Give me a break!....not a comercial one, either! What happened to---everything in moderation? I dunno, what's the world thinking? I think Miriam is taking everything into consideration. You can't/don't[want] to rush change, that's for sure.

Message Edited by KathyS on 07-11-2007 06:43 PM
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions


Stephanie wrote:
Viv,

I think that works- basically your saying whatever the society you're in dictates is how you should do.

Still... I don't think I want a kid calling me by my first name (isn't that when they start to get disrespectful?), so I hope society never dictates that 'round here.


thats why I say, teach the children to use Mr and Mrs, it does show respect and I think when a child shows respect, he/she is more likely to feel the respect for that person too.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Wrighty
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: First Impressions


Stephanie wrote:
Viv,

I think that works- basically your saying whatever the society you're in dictates is how you should do.

Still... I don't think I want a kid calling me by my first name (isn't that when they start to get disrespectful?), so I hope society never dictates that 'round here.




Stephanie,

Thank you for explaining about the library edition hardbacks. That makes perfect sense!

I don't think it's disrespectful for a kid to call an adult by their first name if it's alright with both of them. I live in NY state and we do it both ways. The informal way seems to be used more often but it depends on the situation. I was a teacher for several years and of course all of my students called my Mrs. even my friends' kids. But most of my friends' kids that I didn't teach call me by my first name and that's what I prefer. Sounds confusing doesn't it? My kids call one of my very best friends by her first name but her kids call me Mrs. because they were my students, even though they aren't anymore. It's fine with all of us and it's not meant disrespectfully. I have taught my kids to call someone by the more formal version unless they're invited to do otherwise.
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KathyS
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Re: southern good manners

Debbie, I'm probably the last person to give you an answer on southern manners, not growing up in the south, or the east coast, but I'm thinking maybe some of what Miriam has transferred over to her present *position* was from her mother's teaching. Straight, and narrow protocol of what the southern rules were at that time. Dot, I'm sure, could give you a clearer picture of this. The extremes, don't you think, exist everywhere? Especially in the circles Miriam traveled in?

Kathy S.

Wrighty wrote:
I wonder a few things about Miriam and maybe you southern girls can help me out. I've always heard that people from the south had very fine manners.(I mean that in the best possible way) Do you think that Miriam was too worried about manners, good taste, impressions, etc. because of that? If Miriam was from another area would she be so concerned with it all? I don't mean manners in general I mean to the extreme. There are snobs everywhere but Miriam obviously goes overboard in that department. What are some other opinions?


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KathyS
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Respect

Debbie,
I understand what you're saying, and I agree with you one hundred percent. I think it all depends on the circumstances in which the name is being used. I had kids that found out my first name, and wanted to call me by it, but I needed to make it clear, that was not the proper thing to do as I was their teacher. You have to know where the line is, and make it understood, especially to children. Respect comes in all forms, and this is just one of them.

Kathy S.

Wrighty wrote:

Stephanie wrote:
Viv,

I think that works- basically your saying whatever the society you're in dictates is how you should do.

Still... I don't think I want a kid calling me by my first name (isn't that when they start to get disrespectful?), so I hope society never dictates that 'round here.




Stephanie,

Thank you for explaining about the library edition hardbacks. That makes perfect sense!

I don't think it's disrespectful for a kid to call an adult by their first name if it's alright with both of them. I live in NY state and we do it both ways. The informal way seems to be used more often but it depends on the situation. I was a teacher for several years and of course all of my students called my Mrs. even my friends' kids. But most of my friends' kids that I didn't teach call me by my first name and that's what I prefer. Sounds confusing doesn't it? My kids call one of my very best friends by her first name but her kids call me Mrs. because they were my students, even though they aren't anymore. It's fine with all of us and it's not meant disrespectfully. I have taught my kids to call someone by the more formal version unless they're invited to do otherwise.


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Wrighty
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Respect


KathyS wrote:
Debbie,
I understand what you're saying, and I agree with you one hundred percent. I think it all depends on the circumstances in which the name is being used. I had kids that found out my first name, and wanted to call me by it, but I needed to make it clear, that was not the proper thing to do as I was their teacher. You have to know where the line is, and make it understood, especially to children. Respect comes in all forms, and this is just one of them.

Kathy S.



Kathy,
You were a teacher? What did you teach and for how long?
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vivico1
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Respect

[ Edited ]

Wrighty wrote:

KathyS wrote:
Debbie,
I understand what you're saying, and I agree with you one hundred percent. I think it all depends on the circumstances in which the name is being used. I had kids that found out my first name, and wanted to call me by it, but I needed to make it clear, that was not the proper thing to do as I was their teacher. You have to know where the line is, and make it understood, especially to children. Respect comes in all forms, and this is just one of them.

Kathy S.



Kathy,
You were a teacher? What did you teach and for how long?



It all goes back to the basic fact that manners are defined by circumstances. Sometimes we are formal, sometimes we are informal. It just depends on where we are and what we are doing. Its no different than like at my church, we all call each other by our first names but when refering to someone else or introducing them, we say, Sister Claire Brown, or Brother Carl Brown or just Brother and Sister Brown but in talking to one another its Claire and Carl. But the kids are to call all the adults at church either Brother or Sister whoever. Its a sign of respect for adults. Now, one girl at church for example, I have known since she was 10 and shes 17 now and i have always told her, Katelynn, you can still call me Vivian when we arent at church, I am still just Vivian to you lol, because she wasnt sure as she was getting older if she should be calling me Sister Craig away from church, HECK NO, I am just Vivian and like an aunt to her! Like the saying goes, there is a time and place for everything. The thing is, teach a child manners and respect for adults or even people in certain settings and they will feel that respect for those people too. You guys who have worked with kids, or taught, know that special respect and caring those kids have for you when they call you MRS...and for most students to then call you by your first name away from school will bend the feelings at school so you should remain Mrs even after school. But in general, if kids are taught to call adults Mr and MS or MRS, they will always be correct and comfortable, not wondering. Then if that adult says hey you can call me Jim, its ok (other than teachers, I really think kids should stick with the formal to keep thing right at school, through high school anyway) then its ok. Some kids around here dont even know my last name hardly lol, except at church and thats how i like it. They still respect me but I dont fit into their formal world in some way ,i.e. an authoritive role in their lives, so they just know me for me and respect me for me and we dont need titles then. Circumstances dictate the manners, just that simple.

Now about Miriam...... LOL!! geessshhhh

Message Edited by vivico1 on 07-12-2007 01:38 AM
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Stephanie
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Re: Early Chapters Discussion: Respect

Miriam's views on manners and respect are old-school, and that's one of the reasons I liked her right from the start- I think I have some nostalgia for those old ways myself. Handwritten thank-you notes should still be in vogue.

In the beginning of the book, she tells us just what the trouble is: "It was such a challenge and a frustration to remain a lady in the face of the endless stream of devaluations I endured. But that's what my mother had always said I should do." p. 19.

Her upbringing, her desire to keep her social standing- these are the things she knows. Her problem is she tries too hard. I think we've all known someone like that- they talk too much, they overdo, they fawn, and basically, they're a huge annoyance. But while we're being annoyed, we also can have a little compassion- it's hard to feel like an outsider looking in, which is how Miriam feels since her divorce.
Stephanie
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