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Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Oyster stew

Linda,

Excellent- I've saved this to my computer. Now, to find a good place around here for fresh oysters.

Oh, and you forgot to mention- how much butter for the quart of oysters and 2 quarts of milk sized recipe?

Thanks again, you're a pal!
Stephanie
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew



Stephanie wrote:
Linda,

Excellent- I've saved this to my computer. Now, to find a good place around here for fresh oysters.

Oh, and you forgot to mention- how much butter for the quart of oysters and 2 quarts of milk sized recipe?

Thanks again, you're a pal!




Stephanie:

I use about 3 tablespoon of butter but if your taste buds want more or less it depends on your love for butter or margarine. But of course, I like butter the best.
Frequent Contributor
mairwill
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Oyster Stew

Linda--

Your recipe makes me think of my parents. They loved oyster stew and it sounds like the way my mother fixed it, too.

Later--

Mair
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Oyster stew/clam chowder

All this talk of oyster stew is making my hungry for clam chowder! I made oyster stew when I was first married, and I vaguely remember the oysters having the consistency of little rubber balls. Hmm....so I switched to clams! Now they're just little rubber bands!

All kidding aside :smileyhappy:. I make mine like I make potato soup. Onion, celery, a little chopped(fried) bacon, potatoes- a pinch of summer savory, marjoram, thyme and salt and pepper to taste....and lots of butter. Saute it all together, until onions and celery are soft....then add milk to your own liking/consistency....cook low heat until potatoes are done..... Mash the whole mess up to thicken - add more milk if you desire....then add oysters or clams/extra juice. Heat - eat - Bon appetit!

kiakar wrote:


Stephanie wrote:
Linda,

Excellent- I've saved this to my computer. Now, to find a good place around here for fresh oysters.

Oh, and you forgot to mention- how much butter for the quart of oysters and 2 quarts of milk sized recipe?

Thanks again, you're a pal!




Stephanie:

I use about 3 tablespoon of butter but if your taste buds want more or less it depends on your love for butter or margarine. But of course, I like butter the best.


Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster Stew



mairwill wrote:
Linda--

Your recipe makes me think of my parents. They loved oyster stew and it sounds like the way my mother fixed it, too.

Later--

Mair





Yes, this was handed down years and years ago and its the only way my gang and my siblings will eat it. You put something strange in it and it is not oyster soup or someone is trying to poison them.But I love nutmeg and onions so I might try it sometime just myself. But who can afford oysters for just one person. ha.
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew/clam chowder



KathyS wrote:
All this talk of oyster stew is making my hungry for clam chowder! I made oyster stew when I was first married, and I vaguely remember the oysters having the consistency of little rubber balls. Hmm....so I switched to clams! Now they're just little rubber bands!

All kidding aside :smileyhappy:. I make mine like I make potato soup. Onion, celery, a little chopped(fried) bacon, potatoes- a pinch of summer savory, marjoram, thyme and salt and pepper to taste....and lots of butter. Saute it all together, until onions and celery are soft....then add milk to your own liking/consistency....cook low heat until potatoes are done..... Mash the whole mess up to thicken - add more milk if you desire....then add oysters or clams/extra juice. Heat - eat - Bon appetit!

kiakar wrote:


Stephanie wrote:
Linda,

Excellent- I've saved this to my computer. Now, to find a good place around here for fresh oysters.

Oh, and you forgot to mention- how much butter for the quart of oysters and 2 quarts of milk sized recipe?

Thanks again, you're a pal!




Stephanie:

I use about 3 tablespoon of butter but if your taste buds want more or less it depends on your love for butter or margarine. But of course, I like butter the best.









This also needs to be in the food section: But I think your way is great also. And I do love clams. Just bite down on that oyster(rubber bites) and the taste will send you to heaven. We all have different receipes but we can devour all other's receipes.
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew/clam chowder

:smileyvery-happy: Linda, we are in the Food section!

kiakar wrote:


KathyS wrote:
All this talk of oyster stew is making my hungry for clam chowder! I made oyster stew when I was first married, and I vaguely remember the oysters having the consistency of little rubber balls. Hmm....so I switched to clams! Now they're just little rubber bands!

All kidding aside :smileyhappy:. I make mine like I make potato soup. Onion, celery, a little chopped(fried) bacon, potatoes- a pinch of summer savory, marjoram, thyme and salt and pepper to taste....and lots of butter. Saute it all together, until onions and celery are soft....then add milk to your own liking/consistency....cook low heat until potatoes are done..... Mash the whole mess up to thicken - add more milk if you desire....then add oysters or clams/extra juice. Heat - eat - Bon appetit!

kiakar wrote:


Stephanie wrote:
Linda,

Excellent- I've saved this to my computer. Now, to find a good place around here for fresh oysters.

Oh, and you forgot to mention- how much butter for the quart of oysters and 2 quarts of milk sized recipe?

Thanks again, you're a pal!




Stephanie:

I use about 3 tablespoon of butter but if your taste buds want more or less it depends on your love for butter or margarine. But of course, I like butter the best.









This also needs to be in the food section: But I think your way is great also. And I do love clams. Just bite down on that oyster(rubber bites) and the taste will send you to heaven. We all have different receipes but we can devour all other's receipes.


Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew/clam chowder



KathyS wrote:
:smileyvery-happy: Linda, we are in the Food section!

kiakar wrote:


KathyS wrote:
All this talk of oyster stew is making my hungry for clam chowder! I made oyster stew when I was first married, and I vaguely remember the oysters having the consistency of little rubber balls. Hmm....so I switched to clams! Now they're just little rubber bands!

All kidding aside :smileyhappy:. I make mine like I make potato soup. Onion, celery, a little chopped(fried) bacon, potatoes- a pinch of summer savory, marjoram, thyme and salt and pepper to taste....and lots of butter. Saute it all together, until onions and celery are soft....then add milk to your own liking/consistency....cook low heat until potatoes are done..... Mash the whole mess up to thicken - add more milk if you desire....then add oysters or clams/extra juice. Heat - eat - Bon appetit!

kiakar wrote:


Stephanie wrote:
Linda,

Excellent- I've saved this to my computer. Now, to find a good place around here for fresh oysters.

Oh, and you forgot to mention- how much butter for the quart of oysters and 2 quarts of milk sized recipe?

Thanks again, you're a pal!




Stephanie:

I use about 3 tablespoon of butter but if your taste buds want more or less it depends on your love for butter or margarine. But of course, I like butter the best.









This also needs to be in the food section: But I think your way is great also. And I do love clams. Just bite down on that oyster(rubber bites) and the taste will send you to heaven. We all have different receipes but we can devour all other's receipes.








Ok! The Joke is on me! hehehehehehe
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Mimi's Oyster Stew

Twinksista wrote:
Hi! In some of Dottie's books, my recipes are given, using my nickname: Mimi

Hope you'll try our family recipe for OYSTER STEW:

Scald one qt. milk in a three qt., heavy pot. (This is done over med. heat, pot uncovered and milk left in pot till steam rises, but milk not boiling.)

Meanwhile: Chop a small onion (about 2-3" in diameter), finely;
Chop an equal amount of celery, finely.
Saute' these ingredients in a approximately 2 tablespoons of butter or
margerine, till soft. Add this to the milk. (Sometimes I just put the
three ingredients in a glass cup, cover and microwave till soft.)


Add: 1/4 tsp. of nutmeg, 2 dashes of red pepper - or a couple of shakes of Tabasco Sauce, salt and pepper to taste. Break about 10 Saltine crackers into the mixture. Add a pint of small or medium oysters, with the juice and steam in the soup mixture-just till the edges of the oysters begin to curl. Stir this slowly so nothing sticks to the pot. Serve hot or warm, adding a tablespoon of sherry or vermouth to each bowl. YUM !!! Love, Twinksista

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew/clam chowder

That's ok, Linda....I don't know where I am half the time either! I just now put Dot's sister's Oyster Stew recipe in here....

I know what you mean about introducing different recipes to your kids. If they grow up with a certain taste or expectation of a favorite recipe, they don't want changes to it! But my kids were never sure if they were going to get the same thing twice. I rarely make anything the same way twice....so they come to expect a surprise at every meal! Keeps them on their toes and guessing! :smileyvery-happy: Thankfully I'm not a bad cook...although, I have had some bloopers from time to time. That was the year I lost my sense of taste and smell....because that's how I cook! :smileyvery-happy: I've never lived down a punch I concocted once...yes, only once....it was called the edible punch. No, not drinkable, just edible!
P.S....never put apple sauce in your punch!

Kathy S.
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew/clam chowder



KathyS wrote:
That's ok, Linda....I don't know where I am half the time either! I just now put Dot's sister's Oyster Stew recipe in here....

I know what you mean about introducing different recipes to your kids. If they grow up with a certain taste or expectation of a favorite recipe, they don't want changes to it! But my kids were never sure if they were going to get the same thing twice. I rarely make anything the same way twice....so they come to expect a surprise at every meal! Keeps them on their toes and guessing! :smileyvery-happy: Thankfully I'm not a bad cook...although, I have had some bloopers from time to time. That was the year I lost my sense of taste and smell....because that's how I cook! :smileyvery-happy: I've never lived down a punch I concocted once...yes, only once....it was called the edible punch. No, not drinkable, just edible!
P.S....never put apple sauce in your punch!

Kathy S.




Yes, that doesn't sound too awful good! Kathy S. Did you like loose your vision and touch too? Like you could not see the thickness of the applesauce and see the lumps with your eyes?? And I think I am bad! Oops Not quite!
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew/clam chowder



kiakar wrote:


KathyS wrote:
That's ok, Linda....I don't know where I am half the time either! I just now put Dot's sister's Oyster Stew recipe in here....

I know what you mean about introducing different recipes to your kids. If they grow up with a certain taste or expectation of a favorite recipe, they don't want changes to it! But my kids were never sure if they were going to get the same thing twice. I rarely make anything the same way twice....so they come to expect a surprise at every meal! Keeps them on their toes and guessing! :smileyvery-happy: Thankfully I'm not a bad cook...although, I have had some bloopers from time to time. That was the year I lost my sense of taste and smell....because that's how I cook! :smileyvery-happy: I've never lived down a punch I concocted once...yes, only once....it was called the edible punch. No, not drinkable, just edible!
P.S....never put apple sauce in your punch!

Kathy S.




Yes, that doesn't sound too awful good! Kathy S. Did you like loose your vision and touch too? Like you could not see the thickness of the applesauce and see the lumps with your eyes?? And I think I am bad! Oops Not quite!




You know really Kathy, most of the time we do only have oyster stew on special occasions in the winter time. So I just make it the same old way my sisters, mother, aunts, grandmothers and so on and on make it. But if I buy just a small amt. this winter I will make it by the Mimi receipe. My grown kids do not like onions or nutmeg, why I do not know And the grandkids would like spit it out. They didn't acquire my curiosity for new receipies and can eat anything. If you see me you can tell. just kidding I think!!!
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Trying different spices

[ Edited ]
Yes, my whole family have their likes and dislikes and favorites too. If they're coming over, I try to make things they really like. I do make *some* things the same! :smileyvery-happy: I always try to follow a recipe if I'm baking. But I have done some experimenting with even that.

The punch was something I made when I was first married...and I was just in the throws of my mad scientist mode! We were having a party, and what possesed me to put that can of apple sauce in, I can't remember. Luckily it was a bunch of friends we had over, but a bazillion years later it will still come up in conversation. We get a laugh out of it! And the time I fixed A duck....one duck won't serve a dozen people!....and creative cooking had to be incorporated into that scenario!...but they were all family members, and they forgave me for starving them! :smileyvery-happy:

It's always nice to have something for that special occasion. If you want to make a recipe, try it out on yourself first, *in small quantities*....and if you like it, then tell your kids how much you do like it, and would like them to try it too.

Sometimes certain spices, ones you may not like, take on a different flavor when incorporated into different foods. I make Mexican food, and I love a *hint* of cinnamon in some dishes. It's subtle enough to change the flavor slightly, and no one ever really knows what it is that you've put in it that makes it taste so good!

If nutmeg is an issue...grind it up into a fine powder and use half of what's in the recipe....If your kids don't like onions, sometimes it's because they can see them....grate it instead of chopping it up....or use onion powder! These are the secrets to hiding certain things in a recipe that people think they don't like....and to jazzed up cooking! :smileyvery-happy:

kiakar wrote:


kiakar wrote:


KathyS wrote:
That's ok, Linda....I don't know where I am half the time either! I just now put Dot's sister's Oyster Stew recipe in here....

I know what you mean about introducing different recipes to your kids. If they grow up with a certain taste or expectation of a favorite recipe, they don't want changes to it! But my kids were never sure if they were going to get the same thing twice. I rarely make anything the same way twice....so they come to expect a surprise at every meal! Keeps them on their toes and guessing! :smileyvery-happy: Thankfully I'm not a bad cook...although, I have had some bloopers from time to time. That was the year I lost my sense of taste and smell....because that's how I cook! :smileyvery-happy: I've never lived down a punch I concocted once...yes, only once....it was called the edible punch. No, not drinkable, just edible!
P.S....never put apple sauce in your punch!

Kathy S.




Yes, that doesn't sound too awful good! Kathy S. Did you like loose your vision and touch too? Like you could not see the thickness of the applesauce and see the lumps with your eyes?? And I think I am bad! Oops Not quite!




You know really Kathy, most of the time we do only have oyster stew on special occasions in the winter time. So I just make it the same old way my sisters, mother, aunts, grandmothers and so on and on make it. But if I buy just a small amt. this winter I will make it by the Mimi receipe. My grown kids do not like onions or nutmeg, why I do not know And the grandkids would like spit it out. They didn't acquire my curiosity for new receipies and can eat anything. If you see me you can tell. just kidding I think!!!



Message Edited by KathyS on 07-28-2007 09:09 PM
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew

Linda,

Thanks for the clarification on the amount of butter. I like it too- I always buy real butter (real everything if I can) and I just try to eat small amounts.

:smileyhappy:
Stephanie
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Oyster stew



Stephanie wrote:
Linda,

Thanks for the clarification on the amount of butter. I like it too- I always buy real butter (real everything if I can) and I just try to eat small amounts.

:smileyhappy:






It's nice if you can stop with alittle. ha. I never could.
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Meatloaf

Linda, I'll give you a kind of a generic idea for my recipe for meatloaf. Nothing outrageous. Just adjust these things to half the amount you would use for two pounds of hamburger.

Start with only one pound of hamburger, then you aren't eating it for a week! I use ground chuck, not lean sirloin. I find chuck has more flavor, and it won't be as dry.

Put in the usual egg, which helps bind it together. The more eggs, the firmer/denser it becomes.

I've used everything from soda crackers to smashed dry seasoned bread crumbs. This time I added, also, about a quarter cup of cornmeal for some added flavor.

I sometimes grate in about a quarter cup of carrot, this time I tossed in some finely chopped packaged coleslaw mix, about three quarter cup. I'm not a fan of bell peppers, but I have used them....or finely chopped celery. This all adds moisture, besides flavor.

You can use a sweet onion, or white onion, these are mild when cooked....will add flavor but won't overpower. Just chop them finely.
Add salt and pepper.

I have subbed Worcestershire sauce, with steak sauce or cocktail sauce or ketchup. It's whatever you're in the mood for. I always use milk as I mix it, depends on how much dry ingredients you use....to increase the moisture. This moisture content is important. It may look pretty wet when you're mixing it, but it will cook out. Just as long as you can form it into two loaves, it will firm up as it cooks.


Mix it all together, and divide it into two loaves. Cook it at 350 for about 40 minutes, then take it out and spread Ketchup all over the top, or tomato paste or sauce....French dressing or something along those lines....put it back in the oven and cook it for an additional fifteen minutes. I add this topping at the end to avoid burning. You won't dry it out if you use the chuck and enough moisture to begin with.
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Meatloaf

Hey thanks for the various ways of subing ingredients. I will treasure this since I fix it alot. Thank again!
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Meatloaf

Linda, it was my pleasure! The next day, just slice a piece of this meatloaf....fry it brown....melt some cheddar cheese on it, slap it on your favorite bread, with tomato and lettuce....with your favorite *miracle whip* that I know you love :smileyhappy:.....and vola` - a sandwich made in heaven!
Kathy

kiakar wrote:
Hey thanks for the various ways of subing ingredients. I will treasure this since I fix it alot. Thank again!


Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Meatloaf

Kathy,

I love your meatloaf tips- I use all the same things you do, but it's nice to know what the ingredients do - the eggs, for instance. I think I'll use two from now on, instead of one.

I have a tip in return - when you put the catsup on top, mix in some brown sugar. It's not as cloying as barbecue sauce would be, but it does add a nice sweetness and takes out some of the acidity of the catsup.
Stephanie
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Meatloaf



Stephanie wrote:
Kathy,

I love your meatloaf tips- I use all the same things you do, but it's nice to know what the ingredients do - the eggs, for instance. I think I'll use two from now on, instead of one.

I have a tip in return - when you put the catsup on top, mix in some brown sugar. It's not as cloying as barbecue sauce would be, but it does add a nice sweetness and takes out some of the acidity of the catsup.


That brown sugar sounds good to me! I'll try it next time.

If you've ever used Russian, or Catalina dressing, it sort of gives that sweet/sour taste as well, which is good on fried/baked pork chops.

Thanks for your tip!
K.
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