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Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Sense of Southern California


KathyS wrote:
I'm sorry, Debbie...that list was given to me by my daughter, yesterday, and I couldn't resist posting it. Of course it was forwarded to every known Californian! A lot of those things on the list, was stuff only people from So.Ca. would know...

The word, SIGALERT = SIGNAL ALLERT. That's part of the major freeway systems here. Electronically operated signs along the freeway that tell you when there is a major problem up ahead, or they can tell you to be on the watch if there has been an abduction - Info of the descriptions of cars, etc. If you're watching the news on TV, or listening to the radio, our stations have reporters that give the *sigalert* for all of our freeway systems. We have so many freeways, you can usually take alternate routes.....unless it's one of the major arteries which takes you out of Los Angeles. Then you can be stuck, dead still, for hours. The *five (5)* is one of the first, oldest freeways that takes you into LA. It's always a mess! And PCH stands for Pacific Coast Highway. The highway that runs up the coast of our state, changing to Hwy 101. It's a beautiful drive, overlooking the ocean, in places. It also runs through the city of Malibu, but can have major congestion. I live closer to the Palm Springs area, although not in the desert, and our freeways are constantly being rebuilt. You can't imagine the major over-passes/interchanges being constructed now! Something out of the Jetson's!

Sorry, probably TMI? (too much information) :smileyvery-happy:
Kathy S.

Wrighty wrote:
I'm from the other side of the country and I get most of those except the sigalert, PCH and Five. What are they?







Thanks Kathy! I do know what those are now, I just wasn't sure with the abbreviations. I have family that lives there so between them and hearing about things on TV, movies, books, the news, etc. all of that stuff is familiar. I hear all of the time how horrendous the traffic is and it can add hours onto your travel time. And everyone has cars because things are too spread out to walk much. Oh well, we all have the good and the bad where we live. :smileyhappy:
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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A Sense of Southern California

Sounds interesting & very filling! Tell me is it true that Californians put mayonnaise on their hamburgers?




KathyS wrote:
Liz, I did explain two of those, but the In-N-Out is a drive through/or eat in, worlds best hamburgers...they're huge hamburgers, probably half a cow! You can have them any way your heart desires! With french fries abounding!....I personally am not that enthralled with them, probably because it's usually more than I can eat, but I think it's just a status thing with people. I thought they were all over the US.

Kathy S.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Sense of Southern California

Liz, I can't speak for all of Calif., but if it's Best Food's mayo, and definately NOT Miracle Whip, I'll put it on my hamburger. Actually, the salad dressing, Thousand Island, is great on hamburgers. Or mix Ketchup, dill relish and mayo together....and it has to run down your arm when you eat it! I don't put Ketchup on my plate and dip my hamburger in it, like some people I've seen, do! :smileywink: But I do BBQ a lot, and hamburgers is high on the list! Now I'm getting hungry...see what you started?! :smileysurprised:

Kathy S.

LizzieAnn wrote:
Sounds interesting & very filling! Tell me is it true that Californians put mayonnaise on their hamburgers?




KathyS wrote:
Liz, I did explain two of those, but the In-N-Out is a drive through/or eat in, worlds best hamburgers...they're huge hamburgers, probably half a cow! You can have them any way your heart desires! With french fries abounding!....I personally am not that enthralled with them, probably because it's usually more than I can eat, but I think it's just a status thing with people. I thought they were all over the US.

Kathy S.





Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: A Sense of Southern California



KathyS wrote:
Liz, I can't speak for all of Calif., but if it's Best Food's mayo, and definately NOT Miracle Whip, I'll put it on my hamburger. Actually, the salad dressing, Thousand Island, is great on hamburgers. Or mix Ketchup, dill relish and mayo together....and it has to run down your arm when you eat it! I don't put Ketchup on my plate and dip my hamburger in it, like some people I've seen, do! :smileywink: But I do BBQ a lot, and hamburgers is high on the list! Now I'm getting hungry...see what you started?! :smileysurprised:

Kathy S.

LizzieAnn wrote:
Sounds interesting & very filling! Tell me is it true that Californians put mayonnaise on their hamburgers?




KathyS wrote:
Liz, I did explain two of those, but the In-N-Out is a drive through/or eat in, worlds best hamburgers...they're huge hamburgers, probably half a cow! You can have them any way your heart desires! With french fries abounding!....I personally am not that enthralled with them, probably because it's usually more than I can eat, but I think it's just a status thing with people. I thought they were all over the US.

Kathy S.










I think you just described the McDonald's special sauce they use. Its mayo, catsup and french dressing I think. I probably have it wrong! I like Miracle Whip!! Its so sweet sour good and its not fattening. It also want go bad as easy. What can be better for you! ha. And nothing but that and tomato and lettuce make a good hamburger.
To me of course.
Frequent Contributor
homereader
Posts: 101
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Sense of Place


KathyS wrote:
How many of you have felt that there is someplace special you belonged? Someplace you've connected to? Was it while walking down a path through a flower covered meadow? - sitting on a shell covered beach, listening to the roar of the ocean, then hearing the quiet contrast as the tide pulls back from the shore? - inhaling the air of the desert, after a rain? - hearing the sounds of a breeze as it whistled through a stand of pine trees? - feeling insignificant as you witness the overwhelming grandeur of a sky upon a mountain top? - or quietly rocking in Miss Josie's chair on her front porch, taking in those sunsets that Dot talks about - all the while having this sense that you belonged, wanting to be right there, nowhere else, but right there?

A sense of place - This is only one of the many things Dot's words spoke to me about. Do you have that sense of place? Is it a physical place, or is it a place in your heart, or is it both?




A sense of place is sitting in my mom's house, built in 1950, looking at the same waterview that I have looked at since I was born (in 1950)

Being on cross country skis in the woods, with fresh fallen snow and a clear blue sky..... and feeling WARM.

Being with friends who have known me for decades. No need to provide any "back stories." They know it all and just accept me as I am.

Seeing my baby brother (age 55) after 2 years and being able to pick up a conversation as if we had just had a good heart-to-heart yesterday.

Those are examples of my sense of place.

OH OH> Also, Newport, RI. It has a special place in my heart that cuts through time, high school years, early adult, marriage, middle age. I live 1,000 miles away now, but I can visit and still find the same landmarks in the exact spots where they were on my last visit.

Thanks for asking. It was most enjoyable coming up with my personal answers.

Janet (FL, formerly MA)
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