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Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Sense of Place

How many of you have felt that there is someplace special you belonged? Someplace you've connected to? Was it while walking down a path through a flower covered meadow? - sitting on a shell covered beach, listening to the roar of the ocean, then hearing the quiet contrast as the tide pulls back from the shore? - inhaling the air of the desert, after a rain? - hearing the sounds of a breeze as it whistled through a stand of pine trees? - feeling insignificant as you witness the overwhelming grandeur of a sky upon a mountain top? - or quietly rocking in Miss Josie's chair on her front porch, taking in those sunsets that Dot talks about - all the while having this sense that you belonged, wanting to be right there, nowhere else, but right there?

A sense of place - This is only one of the many things Dot's words spoke to me about. Do you have that sense of place? Is it a physical place, or is it a place in your heart, or is it both?
Frequent Contributor
mairwill
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Sense of Place

KathyS and All--

I really only have that "sense of place" about a few places. One is my home. I sometimes just look around and just feel so good. Not that my house is anything special, but it is our house and I feel comfortable and I am a part of it. I sit outside and think, "Life is grand."

The other place is San Diego. My husband and I have spent many vacations in San Diego and even a month once when he had a hip replacement. When we walk out of the airport and just feel that cooler, less humid air (so different from KY in the summer), I feel good. And then we go and do the things we usually do--nothing special, but it just feels right. Eating at our traditional first day lunch looking out onto the water and having a glass of wine. Walking on the beach. The hotel and the area that we stay in and the area around it. I love it.

I also feel that "sense of place" on the golf course. Not that I'm a good golfer, but the memories of golf, the traditions of golf, the joy of being outside, the smell of my hands after I play golf, but most of all being with my golf buds and having a great time. What could be better?

Later--

Mair
Distinguished Wordsmith
maxcat
Posts: 4,012
Registered: ‎11-01-2006
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Re: Sense of Place

I would love to live up on a mountaintop overlooking a valley. I get this sense every time we hike in the mountains. My husband won't move as he would tire of shoveling snow but you think of that secondary. First is the reality of being on that mountaintop looking out at the great view.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep and miles to go before I sleep - Robert Frost
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place



maxcat wrote:
I would love to live up on a mountaintop overlooking a valley. I get this sense every time we hike in the mountains. My husband won't move as he would tire of shoveling snow but you think of that secondary. First is the reality of being on that mountaintop looking out at the great view.




Yea, Maxcat, I wold love to find myself living in a cottage by the raw ocean, with rough waves but would be higher enough to remain safe from their ravages. And the sand so burning on the soles of my feet but instead be strong enough to warm my heart without a scource. As the roars of the ocean would go on all night , raging like a hungry tiger but calming as the morning when the sun shows its bright sunny face that presents it self on the calmness of the ocean.
Author
dotfrank
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎06-13-2007
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Re: Sense of Place

When I was a young chick I read all the Carlos Castenada books and he always talked about "power spots" and for all the whacked out stuff he talked about, power spots are a truism. I feel most powerful and complete on Sullivans Island in SC. Y'all know that about me but it's true - to extend that description I would add that I feel most empowered, peaceful, and sane on my porch on a hot sultry night. I can think more clearly there and in that Turkish bath weather. Go figure. And the winter beach there does it for me too. That's when I think up new books.


Learn more about Bulls Island.

Discover all Dorothea Benton Frank titles.


Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place



dotfrank wrote:
When I was a young chick I read all the Carlos Castenada books and he always talked about "power spots" and for all the whacked out stuff he talked about, power spots are a truism. I feel most powerful and complete on Sullivans Island in SC. Y'all know that about me but it's true - to extend that description I would add that I feel most empowered, peaceful, and sane on my porch on a hot sultry night. I can think more clearly there and in that Turkish bath weather. Go figure. And the winter beach there does it for me too. That's when I think up new books.




Something definitely does it for you! Cause you write awesome books.
Author
dotfrank
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎06-13-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place

Thanks. Seriously. I try my best.


Learn more about Bulls Island.

Discover all Dorothea Benton Frank titles.


Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place



dotfrank wrote:
Thanks. Seriously. I try my best.




You are quite welcome!
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place

Kathy,

Great question - I knew Miriam had two places when I started reading, that SC was going to be her "real" place, but Manhattan was my place for so long, I understood Miriam's feelings there. To have a house there! Well, the green monster visited me in Miriam's garden.

My real sense of place - like Mair, I have a few. Libraries. They all smell the same, they feel the same, and I am always gravitating toward one. Has anyone ever noticed that new children's books, especially the ones in the library, smell slightly of something not-very-nice? I won't mention it, just to see if anyone else knows what I mean.

My gardens - my entire yard is planted. Pool in the middle, gardens all around, even out front. I do not have a "lawn" - what a waste of gardening space! There's a grassy area around the chess table patio in the back yard, but it's not very big. Have to be careful not to get conked on the head with a grapefruit while you're playing chess, too.

The water- doesn't matter if I actually go sit by it, or feel the spray of it on me, but I do live on an island, so I have to drive over it every day, no matter where I'm going. I've always lived on an island, or near a river or lake, except once. When we lived in Colorado I was really out of sorts- but there was a reservoir not too far away, and my husband had to take me there every two weeks, just so I could get back to normal. :smileyhappy:
Stephanie
Frequent Contributor
CAT72
Posts: 43
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place

I grew up in the UpCountry of SC, raised by LowCountry parents, and while I feel very connected and right when I am in CLEMSON, I also feel very connected and peaceful when I go to the LowCountry (especially the Charleston area where I have many family members). As I type this I am now sitting at Litchfield Beach totally relaxed and getting rested up from a whirlwind trip to DC with 45 other teachers.
UPCOUTRY GIRL...LOWCOUNTRY HEART!!!
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place



CAT72 wrote:
I grew up in the UpCountry of SC, raised by LowCountry parents, and while I feel very connected and right when I am in CLEMSON, I also feel very connected and peaceful when I go to the LowCountry (especially the Charleston area where I have many family members). As I type this I am now sitting at Litchfield Beach totally relaxed and getting rested up from a whirlwind trip to DC with 45 other teachers.




Have a great time; the beach, the beach, I will never get enough of it. Was it a meeting or a rally? My daughter is a teacher and has gone to education seminars there.
Frequent Contributor
kathleenOH
Posts: 47
Registered: ‎11-13-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place

You are so right about being selective about the sense of place. I feel it in my parents backyard, on the beach in the Outer Banks or sitting with my best girlfriends (anywhere.) To me it's a feeling of peace, happiness & contentment and that can happen only when I open myself to it. It's too bad that we don't allow ourselves to feel it more often.

Kathleen-Ohio
Kathleen - Ohio
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

A Sense of Southern California

Your monthly house payments exceed your annual income (and you think
it's normal)
You drive next to a Rolls Royce and don't notice it.
You don't know anyone's phone number unless you check your cell phone.
You speak Spanish, but you're not Mexican.
You begin to "lie" to your friends about how close you are when you
know darn well that it'll take you at least an hour to get there (see
below).
Getting anywhere from point A to point B, no matter what the distance,
takes about "twenty minutes".
You drive to your neighborhood block party.
In the "winter", you can go to the beach and ski at Big Bear on the
same day or mow your lawn in your shorts on New Years Day, and maybe
sunburn.
You eat a different ethnic food for every meal.
If your destination is more than 5 minutes away on foot, you're
definitely driving.
Calling your neighbors requires knowing their area code.
You know what "In-'N-Out" is and feel bad for all the other states
because they don't have any.
Stop signs stand for, Slow T o O bserve P olice.
You go to a tanning salon before going to the beach.
You eat pineapple on pizza.
Your cell phone has left a permanent impression on the side of your
head.
You think that Venice is a beach.
The waitress asks if you'd like "carbs" in your meal.
You know who the Tinsel Underwear dude at Venice Beach is.
You classify new people you meet by their Area Code. An "818" would
never date a "562" and anyone from "323" or "213" is ghetto.
Best area code: "949/714." Nobody likes anyone from the
"909/951" because it stinks there. (I have to take expection to this one!)
You call 911 and they put you on hold.
You have a gym membership because it's mandatory.
The gym is packed at 3 pm...on a workday.
You think you are better than the people who live "Over the Hill". It
doesn't matter which side of the hill you are currently residing, you
are just better than them, for whatever reason.
You know that if you drive two miles in any direction you will find a
McDonald's, Subway or a Starbucks. (Do we have to go two miles for a
Starbucks?)
You know what "Sigalert", "PCH", and the "Five" mean.
You know the meaning behind the name of the 405 freeway.... because it
takes 4 hours to get one way, and 5 hours to get back.
It's barely sprinkling rain and there's a report on every news station:
"STORM WATCH".
The Terminator is your Governor.
Frequent Contributor
CAT72
Posts: 43
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Sense of Place



kiakar wrote:


CAT72 wrote:
I grew up in the UpCountry of SC, raised by LowCountry parents, and while I feel very connected and right when I am in CLEMSON, I also feel very connected and peaceful when I go to the LowCountry (especially the Charleston area where I have many family members). As I type this I am now sitting at Litchfield Beach totally relaxed and getting rested up from a whirlwind trip to DC with 45 other teachers.




Have a great time; the beach, the beach, I will never get enough of it. Was it a meeting or a rally? My daughter is a teacher and has gone to education seminars there.




It was educational and we had fun too. Got lots of neat pics and great info for my students this coming year.
UPCOUTRY GIRL...LOWCOUNTRY HEART!!!
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Sense of Southern California



KathyS wrote:
Your monthly house payments exceed your annual income (and you think
it's normal)
You drive next to a Rolls Royce and don't notice it.
You don't know anyone's phone number unless you check your cell phone.
You speak Spanish, but you're not Mexican.
You begin to "lie" to your friends about how close you are when you
know darn well that it'll take you at least an hour to get there (see
below).
Getting anywhere from point A to point B, no matter what the distance,
takes about "twenty minutes".
You drive to your neighborhood block party.
In the "winter", you can go to the beach and ski at Big Bear on the
same day or mow your lawn in your shorts on New Years Day, and maybe
sunburn.
You eat a different ethnic food for every meal.
If your destination is more than 5 minutes away on foot, you're
definitely driving.
Calling your neighbors requires knowing their area code.
You know what "In-'N-Out" is and feel bad for all the other states
because they don't have any.
Stop signs stand for, Slow T o O bserve P olice.
You go to a tanning salon before going to the beach.
You eat pineapple on pizza.
Your cell phone has left a permanent impression on the side of your
head.
You think that Venice is a beach.
The waitress asks if you'd like "carbs" in your meal.
You know who the Tinsel Underwear dude at Venice Beach is.
You classify new people you meet by their Area Code. An "818" would
never date a "562" and anyone from "323" or "213" is ghetto.
Best area code: "949/714." Nobody likes anyone from the
"909/951" because it stinks there. (I have to take expection to this one!)
You call 911 and they put you on hold.
You have a gym membership because it's mandatory.
The gym is packed at 3 pm...on a workday.
You think you are better than the people who live "Over the Hill". It
doesn't matter which side of the hill you are currently residing, you
are just better than them, for whatever reason.
You know that if you drive two miles in any direction you will find a
McDonald's, Subway or a Starbucks. (Do we have to go two miles for a
Starbucks?)
You know what "Sigalert", "PCH", and the "Five" mean.
You know the meaning behind the name of the 405 freeway.... because it
takes 4 hours to get one way, and 5 hours to get back.
It's barely sprinkling rain and there's a report on every news station:
"STORM WATCH".
The Terminator is your Governor.




Ha!ha! The terminator is your governor! I laughed at that but you could say he is the kingergarten teacher that was a cop, right?
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Sense of Southern California

Kiakar wrote: Ha!ha! The terminator is your governor! I laughed at that but you could say he is the kingergarten teacher that was a cop, right?
________________________

Yes, Linda, you could probably say that too! :smileyhappy:
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Sense of Southern California


KathyS wrote:
Kiakar wrote: Ha!ha! The terminator is your governor! I laughed at that but you could say he is the kingergarten teacher that was a cop, right?
________________________

Yes, Linda, you could probably say that too! :smileyhappy:




I'm from the other side of the country and I get most of those except the sigalert, PCH and Five. What are they?
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Sense of Southern California

I'm sorry, Debbie...that list was given to me by my daughter, yesterday, and I couldn't resist posting it. Of course it was forwarded to every known Californian! A lot of those things on the list, was stuff only people from So.Ca. would know...

The word, SIGALERT = SIGNAL ALLERT. That's part of the major freeway systems here. Electronically operated signs along the freeway that tell you when there is a major problem up ahead, or they can tell you to be on the watch if there has been an abduction - Info of the descriptions of cars, etc. If you're watching the news on TV, or listening to the radio, our stations have reporters that give the *sigalert* for all of our freeway systems. We have so many freeways, you can usually take alternate routes.....unless it's one of the major arteries which takes you out of Los Angeles. Then you can be stuck, dead still, for hours. The *five (5)* is one of the first, oldest freeways that takes you into LA. It's always a mess! And PCH stands for Pacific Coast Highway. The highway that runs up the coast of our state, changing to Hwy 101. It's a beautiful drive, overlooking the ocean, in places. It also runs through the city of Malibu, but can have major congestion. I live closer to the Palm Springs area, although not in the desert, and our freeways are constantly being rebuilt. You can't imagine the major over-passes/interchanges being constructed now! Something out of the Jetson's!

Sorry, probably TMI? (too much information) :smileyvery-happy:
Kathy S.

Wrighty wrote:

KathyS wrote:
Kiakar wrote: Ha!ha! The terminator is your governor! I laughed at that but you could say he is the kingergarten teacher that was a cop, right?
________________________

Yes, Linda, you could probably say that too! :smileyhappy:




I'm from the other side of the country and I get most of those except the sigalert, PCH and Five. What are they?


Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Sense of Southern California

:smileyvery-happy: ROFL

Kathy - I love that!!!!

Especially the pineapple on pizza - I'll never understand that combination! :\\

Okay - what's an "in'n'out"? And what do "Sigalert", "PCH", and the "Five" mean?





KathyS wrote:
Your monthly house payments exceed your annual income (and you think
it's normal)
You drive next to a Rolls Royce and don't notice it.
You don't know anyone's phone number unless you check your cell phone.
You speak Spanish, but you're not Mexican.
You begin to "lie" to your friends about how close you are when you
know darn well that it'll take you at least an hour to get there (see
below).
Getting anywhere from point A to point B, no matter what the distance,
takes about "twenty minutes".
You drive to your neighborhood block party.
In the "winter", you can go to the beach and ski at Big Bear on the
same day or mow your lawn in your shorts on New Years Day, and maybe
sunburn.
You eat a different ethnic food for every meal.
If your destination is more than 5 minutes away on foot, you're
definitely driving.
Calling your neighbors requires knowing their area code.
You know what "In-'N-Out" is and feel bad for all the other states
because they don't have any.
Stop signs stand for, Slow T o O bserve P olice.
You go to a tanning salon before going to the beach.
You eat pineapple on pizza.
Your cell phone has left a permanent impression on the side of your
head.
You think that Venice is a beach.
The waitress asks if you'd like "carbs" in your meal.
You know who the Tinsel Underwear dude at Venice Beach is.
You classify new people you meet by their Area Code. An "818" would
never date a "562" and anyone from "323" or "213" is ghetto.
Best area code: "949/714." Nobody likes anyone from the
"909/951" because it stinks there. (I have to take expection to this one!)
You call 911 and they put you on hold.
You have a gym membership because it's mandatory.
The gym is packed at 3 pm...on a workday.
You think you are better than the people who live "Over the Hill". It
doesn't matter which side of the hill you are currently residing, you
are just better than them, for whatever reason.
You know that if you drive two miles in any direction you will find a
McDonald's, Subway or a Starbucks. (Do we have to go two miles for a
Starbucks?)
You know what "Sigalert", "PCH", and the "Five" mean.
You know the meaning behind the name of the 405 freeway.... because it
takes 4 hours to get one way, and 5 hours to get back.
It's barely sprinkling rain and there's a report on every news station:
"STORM WATCH".
The Terminator is your Governor.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
Distinguished Bibliophile
KathyS
Posts: 6,898
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: A Sense of Southern California

Liz, I did explain two of those, but the In-N-Out is a drive through/or eat in, worlds best hamburgers...they're huge hamburgers, probably half a cow! You can have them any way your heart desires! With french fries abounding!....I personally am not that enthralled with them, probably because it's usually more than I can eat, but I think it's just a status thing with people. I thought they were all over the US.

Kathy S.
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