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Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
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Middle Chapters: Doña Ana's Interest in Don Juan

During the festival of Corpus Christi, Doña Ana says she is just "curious" about Don Juan (p. 130). What is she curious about? Is that her only interest? Doña Ana tells Don Juan a true passion that is not merely lust can only exist in marriage (or today we would say committed relationship). Do you agree?


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Note: This topic refers to events through the chapter titled "The Truth" (through p. 179). Some readers of this thread may not have finished the book. If you are referring to events that occur after "The Truth" please use "Spoiler Warning" in the subject line of your post. Thanks!

Stephanie
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smg5775
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Re: Middle Chapters: Doña Ana's Interest in Don Juan



Stephanie wrote:

During the festival of Corpus Christi, Doña Ana says she is just "curious" about Don Juan (p. 130). What is she curious about? Is that her only interest? Doña Ana tells Don Juan a true passion that is not merely lust can only exist in marriage (or today we would say committed relationship). Do you agree?

Dona Ana is curious about what kind of man Don Juan is. Does he live up to his reputation? What is it about him that causes women to welcome him into their beds? Why do women risk their reputations and marriages for him? She also wants to see if he is able to seduce her or not and if he will try. She is only beginning to feel lust towards which may possibly lead to other feelings.

True passion cannot exist outside of a committed relationship. If you are committed to another you will want the best for that person and you will do whatever it takes to continue the relationship. If you are not committed to one another you leave at the first sign of trouble. Lust is fleeting and won't sustain a relationship. You must have interests in common.

Sheila
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Stephanie
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Re: Middle Chapters: Doña Ana's Interest in Don Juan

Sheila,

I agree - passion is not sustainable by itself, it needs a motivator. Consider the many things people are passionate about, not just other people. In order for passion to continue, there must be a commitment and interest.
Stephanie
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DouglasAbrams
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Re: Middle Chapters: Doña Ana's Interest in Don Juan



smg5775 wrote:


Stephanie wrote:

During the festival of Corpus Christi, Doña Ana says she is just "curious" about Don Juan (p. 130). What is she curious about? Is that her only interest? Doña Ana tells Don Juan a true passion that is not merely lust can only exist in marriage (or today we would say committed relationship). Do you agree?

Dona Ana is curious about what kind of man Don Juan is. Does he live up to his reputation? What is it about him that causes women to welcome him into their beds? Why do women risk their reputations and marriages for him? She also wants to see if he is able to seduce her or not and if he will try. She is only beginning to feel lust towards which may possibly lead to other feelings.

True passion cannot exist outside of a committed relationship. If you are committed to another you will want the best for that person and you will do whatever it takes to continue the relationship. If you are not committed to one another you leave at the first sign of trouble. Lust is fleeting and won't sustain a relationship. You must have interests in common.






Sheila, having been together with my wife for 19 years and married for 15, I must say that in my experience I believe that true passion does require commitment. You mention interests in common, and I agree, although I think even beneath the interests are the core vales that we share with our partner and ultimately what we believe the relationship is about.

Warmly,

Doug
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Stephanie
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Re: Middle Chapters: Doña Ana's Interest in Don Juan

Having the same views regarding the relationship is very important, and I suppose that I lump that idea in with the idea of commitment. When a couple starts allowing the idea of dissolving the marriage to enter their thoughts and conversations, they are opening the door. Letting resentments and petty annoyances build up in one's mind is a recipe for divorce. You have to pay more attention to what's good than what's bad. For Juan and Ana to have a monogamous relationship, Juan would have to put aside the thought that one woman would not be able to satisfy him for a lifetime.
Stephanie
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smg5775
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Re: Middle Chapters: Doña Ana's Interest in Don Juan



Stephanie wrote:
Having the same views regarding the relationship is very important, and I suppose that I lump that idea in with the idea of commitment. When a couple starts allowing the idea of dissolving the marriage to enter their thoughts and conversations, they are opening the door. Letting resentments and petty annoyances build up in one's mind is a recipe for divorce. You have to pay more attention to what's good than what's bad. For Juan and Ana to have a monogamous relationship, Juan would have to put aside the thought that one woman would not be able to satisfy him for a lifetime.




I think Don Juan is starting to explore the idea that one woman will be able to satisfy him for a lifetime. He's scared but willing to ask the question of whether or not it's possible to want only one woman. He's also going to others who are in monogamous relationships (Manuel and Serena) to find out how they do it. He's trying but it will take him a while to feel comfortable with fidelity.
Sheila
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Stephanie
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Re: Middle Chapters: Doña Ana's Interest in Don Juan

[ Edited ]
Sheila,

This is the tie-in to the section: The Book as a Whole, the Secret of Marriage. Manuel's advice is my favorite part of the book. Twenty escudos indeed! :smileyvery-happy:

Message Edited by Stephanie on 06-12-2007 12:47 PM
Stephanie
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